Numb3rs

Season 1 Episode 13

Man Hunt

5
Aired Friday 10:00 PM May 13, 2005 on CBS

Trivia

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  • Trivia

    • Opening Numb3rs:
      182,000 FEDERAL PRISON INMATES
      63 ESCAPES
      2 FUGITIVES
      1 WITNESS

    • The Math:
      Chapman-Kolmogorov Equation
      Bayesian Inference - A statistical model where probability is based on belief, not frequency or proportion.
      Markov Chain - A mathematical concept that states the past is irrelevant for predicting the future given knowledge of the present.
      Monty Hall Problem - A problem with a counter-intuitive solution explained by Charlie in his lecture on odds using goats and automobiles.

    • Don was in Fugitive Recovery in Phoenix before he moved back to L.A.

    • Charlie finally teaches a class in this episode.

    • This was the first time Don and Alan beat Charlie in a game of chess.

    • Charlie has trouble with spelling. He spells the word 'anomaly' as 'anomoly' despite using it constantly as a mathematician.

    • The exact same example Charlie shows with the goat and the car is used in the movie 21.

    • The chess game in the ending scene is the famous chess game Morphy v. Duke of Brunswick and Count Isouard.

    • During the shootout in the end, a bullet hits a metal tube protruding from the ground a bunch of sparks fly off the tube. Technically, this shouldn't happen when a bullet is propelled from a gun like the one they were using.

    • Watch the chess pieces on the board in the final scene. Charlie's knight on his right side moves over two squares to the right after taking Alan's bishop, without taking anything. If it didn't move, Alan wouldn't have been able to checkmate Charlie.

  • Quotes

    • Cooper: We spent two weeks in a cemetery once, waiting for this guy to show up at his wife's grave. Grabbed him as he was putting a dozen roses on her headstone.
      David: She died while he was in prison huh?
      Cooper: Just before he went. He's the one that killed her.

    • Charlie: Coincidences are a mathematical reality. Statistically unlikely events can and often do occur. Just look at the genesis of our planet.
      Larry: Well now, I agree that the factors that brought about life on earth were statistically unlikely, but given the vastness of the cosmos, the limitless possibilities for matter and energy... I'm with Einstein on this: there are no accidents.

    • David: I take it you two know each other?
      Don: Yeah. Well, you know I used to work in fugitive recovery? Well, we were a team.
      Cooper: No better way to get to know a man than to spend a week using a gas station restroom as home base.
      David: Ah, the good old days.

    • David: The cans are still on her property, technically we need a warrant.
      Cooper: Only if we're trying to build a court case.

    • (Charlie and Larry use a skateboard and gardening tools to recreate a bus crash.)
      Don: Gentlemen, what's this?
      Charlie: Just trying to make sense of something that doesn't make sense.
      Don: I thought that's what you do best. What, uh... what's the problem?
      Larry: Well, apparently that seed spreader.

    • Don: Hey, Dad. What are you doing here?
      Alan: Well, I... I like coming whenever Charlie gives one of these "Math for Dummies" lectures. It's the only time I actually understand what he's talking about.

    • (Cooper listens to one of Charlie's mathematical explanations.)
      Cooper
      : (to Don) Are you sure you're his brother?

    • Alan: Are you going back to man hunting now?
      Don: Oh I see. Dad, come on, don't. This is one case.
      Alan: I seem to recall your saying that about only one case once before. But if you can remember, they were not good days for you, or for me. I mean, we didn't hear from you for weeks. We didn't even know where the hell you were.
      Don: Dad...
      Alan: You do realize that chasing after someone, you could be running away from yourself at the same time.

    • Cooper: These guys usually go where they are familiar, where they are affiliated. They are both from LA, so my guess is they'd both stick around.
      David: Wouldn't it be smarter to leave the area, get away from the search?
      Cooper: Yes sir, but they are not smart, which is why they went to prison to begin with.

    • (Charlie loses a chess game to Don and Alan from misspelling "anomaly".)
      Charlie: Yeah, don't worry. I'll take care of the old man while you're gone.
      Don: All right guys, see ya.
      (Don leaves.)
      Alan: Old man?!
      Charlie: I use it strictly as a term of endearment, father.
      Alan: Well, you better prepare yourself, little boy, because... this old man can kick your ass.
      Charlie: Oh yeah? What, are you gonna cheat again?
      Alan: No, I'm gonna get the Scrabble board.
      Charlie: ...'cause, uh, Scrabble's missing a piece.

    • Charlie: The yellow dots are unsolved or uncredited crimes that have occurred since the bus crash. Crimes possibly committed by McDowd, but those aren't the problems. The problems are the blue dots. Sightings of McDowd called in to LAPD and FBI tip lines. Each dot is a time and a place, but there are... there are hundreds of them.
      Larry: Okay, so the problem is too much data.
      Charlie: The problem is corrupt data, Larry, fictitious data. Here, look, (Points to the blue dots) 9 AM, right? 9 AM, McDowd is sighted in three separate locations, miles apart.
      Larry: Okay, so... so the public, however well meaning, is actually hampering the search by calling in too many sightings.
      Charlie: Unless this man has the ability to be in three places at once.
      Larry: A. That's not entirely impossible. I mean, Quantum Theory does state... (Charlie sighs) ...Okay. Well, for the purposes of this discussion, I'll concede the point.

  • Notes

  • Allusions

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