Penn & Teller: Bullshit!

Season 1 Episode 7

Feng Shui / Bottled Water

0
Aired Monday 10:00 PM Mar 07, 2003 on Showtime
8.8
out of 10
User Rating
63 votes
3

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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In this episode, three Feng Shui consultants who claim that Feng Shui is a "science" are put to the test when all three of them are invited into a home to provide their "science" but all three have different layouts and suggestions and are making a ton of money while they are at it.

Also, two twins go to get a haircut, one will be getting a regular sixteen dollar haircut, and the other will be getting a "feng shui" haircut that looks exactly the same for $150! Penn and Teller explain that this is not a "science" but just a bunch of bullsh**.

Plus, is it true that tap water is no worse then bottled water? As far as Penn and Teller is concerned, it's all the same. A prank is played at a fancy restaurant with the world's first "water steward". He sells a couple all different brands of water that cost up to $8! Where does this water come from? The garden hose out back! Special Guest Experts in this episode include: Erik D. Olson (Drinking Water Expert, Natural Resources Defense Council) Stephen Kay (Spokesman, International Bottled Water Association) David Cho (Feng Shui Consultant) Kartar Diamond (Feng Shui Consultant) Phyllis Sullo (Owner, Sullo Salon and Spa) Milan (Feng Shui Consultant)moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • This show was never intended to shed any light on the real and fascinating topic of feng shui. It was only meant to ridicule and use deceptive tactics to accomplish their goal.moreless

    1.0
    The producer of the **** episode on Feng Shui, Star Price, is a liar. When he approached me about the show he insisted that it was going to be a very complementary and respectful show. There was obviously no title given for the show at the time and I did not know that Penn & Teller would be editted in as the hosts. In fact, Penn is a liar too because Dennis Miller once interviewed Penn and asked him if the people on his show know what they are getting into and Penn said absolutely. Not true.



    The point of this review is not to try to convince anyone skeptical about feng shui that it is in fact a legitimate practice that helps most people. The point is to reveal that the show's producers set up many circumstances in which they could achieve their sole goal of mocking feng shui. For example: they gave 3 consultants each different information about the house that was being assessed. So of course there is going to be a contradictory analysis if one person thinks the house was built in 1950 and another practitioner is told it was built in 1990 and another one something else. If someone is given the wrong information in any field, the results are going to vary or contradict. Feng Shui takes into account time/space theory so the age of a building is critical to the analysis. What viewers also do not know is that they editted the show in such a way, that, at least I can verify for my own interview, that they had me saying things I didn't really say. For instance, they asked me what I charge and I said, "I usually charge 25 cents per square foot, but there are some in my field who charge as much as $2 per square foot." They literally spliced this sentence so that on the show I appeared to say "I charge (pause) $2 per square foot." (8 times the amount I actually charge.) I could go on an on citing one example after another where they editted segments, on purpose, to make us all look ridiculous. I can't speak for the other consultants, who admittedly said some weird things,(every industry has some people who are good and honest and others who are not), but the whole point of the show was to mock, even though they want to give you the impression that they are doing some kind of public service so that you don't get taken advantage of. I have to say that I have been interviewed by all sorts of media people and they almost NEVER want to really understand how feng shui really works. I have offered to conduct blind case studies and do "before" and "after" cases with real subjects, but most media people either want to just portray feng shui as some eccentric Chinese deal-or worse-that it's snake oil and has no value at all. Feng Shui is actually a really amazingly accurate phenomenon. More than thirty years ago people in the United States thought acupuncture was really strange and now it is covered by many insurance companies. To be really scientific, one must always keep an open mind. And in case you think I am just disappointed in the episode I was in, I have to tell you that they were extremely rude to one chiropractor in another episode for no reason at all. They filmed him adjusting a little girl very delicately and they piped in Penn shouting expletives and that he was a child molester! This is all supposed to be very funny at the expense of someone's reputation and livelihood. What viewers don't know is that some of the unsuspecting guests on these shows looked into slander lawsuits, but going up against Showtime is like David and Goliath. Viewers should know that with the general releases we signed, they could have put Saddam Hussein's head on our bodies and there would have been nothing we could have done about it. If someone would like to understand feng shui better, and clear their head from the "****" they heard on the Penn & Teller show, contact me and I will send you a complementary copy of my first book, "Feng Shui for Skeptics: Real Solutions Without Superstition.---www.KartarDiamond.commoreless
  • Glad to see that someone finally saw Feng Shui for the true crap it is.

    7.7
    I loved the whole first half on Feng Shui, and their whole "If it's a science like you keep saying, then if we get three of you to do it, you all should say the exact same thing (or at least very close)." It was hilarious that they were contradicting each other and such. I was hoping for a "Masters of the Feng Shui Deathmatch" or something, but alas. Can you believe how much they charge for their "services""bullsh!t"? Ridiculous.



    However the second half I was a bit conflicted about. I'm not a raving fan of bottled water, but I do keep a pitcher with a built in water filter. I was more than slightly disappointed they didn't mention whether or not this was actually legitimate. All I know is that it does taste better, consistently, and as a result has gotten me to drink a LOT more water than I used to... so it can't be that bad really. Can it? Damn, now that's gonna drive me nuts.moreless
  • I love the Feng Shuei episode! This ain't a science.

    9.0
    I love this bit. They get three Fung Shway "scientists" to discover the ideal layout of a woman's home. They are all different. How would that work, if it is scientific process. Penn's comments only make the entire thing more enjoyable.



    And to make it better, the episode finishes with a segment on the bottled water industry. This could easily have been the whole episode. It is nice. People are tasting bottled water versus tap and can't tell the difference. They serve water from a garden hose in an expensive restaurant, and people think it's wonderful. Most bottled water is the same stuff that comes out the tap.



    No one has the guts to say this stuff. P&T do a fine job of pointing out the obvious things no one will admit.moreless

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (4)

    • Two deleted scenes of Milan hawking feng shui merchandise can be seen on the First Season dvd.

    • The description on the water list for 4.75 per bottle L'eau Du Robinet: "Pure, brisk, and unmistakably French, this running water is bottled directly from the source, while its natural minerals and nutrients are still at their most potent. Its aggressive flavor and brash attitude make it a perfect complement to meats and poultry."

    • The description in the water list for 4.75 per bottle Mt. Fuji: "From the highest reaches of Japan, this refreshing water is known throughout the Far East for its clean and bracing flavor as well as its restorative powers as a natural diuretic and anti-toxin."

    • Names on the bottles of water used in the water steward bit:

      Mt. Fuji-Zen Water

      Amazon-Brazilian rain water

      Agua de Culo (a** water in Spanish)

      Pisse de chat (French...ish for cat pee, as seen in a Deleted scene)

      L'eau Du Robinet (French for tap or sink water)

  • QUOTES (9)

    • Penn: [on the idea of bottled water] Think about it. What other product can you take out of the ground for almost nothing, put in a fancy bottle, and then sell to people for more than GASOLINE! It's almost like printing money!

    • Penn: [on Everest brand water] In fact, if you read the fine print on the f*cking label, they even admit the water comes from a "municipal source"! That is TAP WATER, Brothers and Sisters of the Cult of the Bottle!

    • David: The unfavorable energy settled in the living room. That was determined through these ancient mathematical calculations that, of course, were derived and developed through centuries of empirical observations.
      Penn: Could you PLEASE show your work? Nahh. Didn't think so.

    • Kartar: There's nothing overtly visual right now that I see as being a problem.

      Penn: Overtly visual? What the hell does that mean? I hope there's nothing subtly invisible....

    • Penn: We went to the center of Far Eastern philosophy...Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

    • Penn: [on David's misuse of analogies] If you don't understand analogies, just don't use 'em. It's like...a pig on a tightrope.

    • Penn: If you could, in any way, demonstrate or measure the "chi" they're claiming to direct, you'd win a Nobel Prize for physics. But...why would you want that Stockholm piece of cr*p when you can move stranger's furniture at random for money!

    • Milan: Chi is actually like this yellow ball. It's just moving, bouncing, traveling. [tosses ball]

      Penn: It's not just bouncing and traveling. You're throwing it.

    • David: The best way I can explain the science of Feng Shui is knowing how a cosmic volleyball game is structured.

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