PM Magazine

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(ended 1991)

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AprilFox

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SHOW REVIEWS
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PM Magazine

Show Summary

Welcome to the PM Magazine guide at TV.com. This was the first-ever magazine-format program. From its origins as Evening Magazine on San Francisco's KPIX, PM Magazine provided a lively mix of regular features: travel, health, cuisine. Within two years of its birth in San Francisco, the renamed PM Magazine went into national syndication, thanks to KPIX's owner, Group W Communications. Throughout America, network affiliates jumped at the chance to produce their own segments for this syndicated show. Various markets boasted their own PM Magazine legends, and among the most heralded was WJW (or, between April 1977 and September 1985, WJKW) in Cleveland. Many of that station's sequences were seen nationally. And its gallery of hosts included local music legend Michael Stanley. So loyal was WJW to the cause that they were the last station to run PM Magazine. The only trouble is, the very last edition may never have been seen. Literally. No one is sure, but it is believed that, due to compulsory coverage of the first U.S. war with Iraq, the last PM Magazine was pre-empted and never rescheduled. WJW tried replacing it with something called Cleveland Tonight, which Michael Stanley also fronted, but that didn't last eight months. The passing of PM Magazine marked the end of an era in television. Gone would be the days of pleasant journalism. But in 1998, KPIX brought back an upgraded Evening Magazine, which airs weeknights at 7:00 PT. That show, however, is the Bay Area's only.moreless
Bill Ratliff

Bill Ratliff

Himself - Host

Candy Hasey

Candy Hasey

Herself - Host

John Patrick (IV)

John Patrick (IV)

Himself - Segment Host

Virginia Gunn

Virginia Gunn

Herself - Segment Host

Jim Finerty

Jim Finerty

Himself -Segment Host

Cathy Brugett

Cathy Brugett

Herself - Co-host (Cleveland, Starting Jan. 1979)/Herself - Host

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • PM Magazine was cutting edge - from the perspective of an insider at the National Office during the show's developmental years of 1980 - 1983. Larry Emsweller Senior Coordinating producer.

    8.0
    As Senior Co-coordinating Producer for PM MAGAZNE (1980 - 1983), the real growth years of the program we moved from being video policeman to true consultants for stations affiliated with the show. This is not intended to take away from the Sally Jewitt or "Ziggy" days in the early years,(Ziggy was still at the show and Sally headed South to LA to do Freelance work when I arrived) because two people with 80 some shows to police is an overwhelming task. They did a great job. At the time I arrived, Executive producer Dick Crew and Producer Debbie Messana, recognized that we had to take on a larger more involved role with stations if the show was to succeed. At the time of my arrival we had just completed the first user survey of stations, asking their opinion of what was needed from the national office. For any of the stations wondering, I never saw a group of people so committed to putting into action what was asked for in a study. We went our of our way to respond to the needs of the co-operative. But good things came from that study.



    We created the first ever story production workshop for long format stories in the history of the industry. We went all over the country showing people how to produce a PM Magazine story. The next year, we came back with a "stretching the envelope" format that inspired beyond the basics. Top producers in the country today still use those techniques learned from those seminars. Folks like John Norton, Karen McGee, David Baxter, Tom Weitzel and others deserve the credit for that workshop. They were the true story tellers in the bunch. Mr. Crew gave it his blessing. I had the privilege of co-coordinating the team, but they did all the heavy lifting. Between Debbie Messana and I we got them were they supposed to be, and we delivered the same message in 40 different places over the course of a 4 week period. We were tired road warriors, but the pay-off were better stories and higher ratings. Everyone benefited from the sessions



    We introduced concepts such as how to compete against the competition. What elements in Family Feud or other top syndicated shows could be combined in our show.



    There were so many innovations that developed during the tenure of the program.



    Everyone who participated in the show from the National office in San Francisco to those at each of the affiliated stations went on to bigger and better things in their careers.



    Many stars got their starts on PM MAGAZINE. Matt Laurer with the TODAY SHOW, Mary Hart with ENTERTAINMENT TONIGHT, Steve Doocy with Fox and Friends, Barry Nolan with Hard Copy, and the list goes on.



    The show was a credit to the broadcast industry. People who were involved can look back at their time with the show and say they were a part of broadcasting history. I know I feel that way. And I am proud of it.



    Everyone remembers the face people. Those in front of the camera. But it took those who toiled behind the camera at the local stations, and in the National office to set the course and the vision for what is now regarded as an industry Icon. Larry Emsweller - former

    Senior Co-coordinating producer

    PM MAGAZINE - National Office

    1980-1983



    Currently - President/Total Marketing Tactics Media/New Media/PR/Branding Company Nashville, TNmoreless