Point Pleasant

Season 1 Episode 4

The Lonely Hunter

2
Aired Thursday 9:00 PM Feb 03, 2005 on FOX
8.2
out of 10
User Rating
80 votes
4

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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The Lonely Hunter
AIRED:
A meteor shower sets off more than fireworks at a dinner party Boyd hosts; Logan's possessiveness and insecurity over Sarah's relationship with Boyd intensifies; Amber downplays things to capture Ben's attention; things come to a (beach) head at a party for Jesse, Paula and Christina; while Christina confronts a deadly admirer out to rid Point Pleasant of sin.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • There’s going to be a meteor shower that you can see from the Point Pleasant beach. Jesse Parker breaks up with Paula Hargrove after 2 years of dating. There’s a new psycho in town. Lucas is up to no good.moreless

    7.2
    Okay, so I spoke too soon last time. There was a line of people in church in this episode. Father Tomas is feeling the strain of having to do all the church duties since the disappearance of Father David. Why wasn’t Sarah Parker helping the Father Tomas in church? Maybe she only works weekends. I thought this episode was really just a filler as there was nothing special going on. Of course the break up of Lucas and Paula was important. Paula was a cheating whore anyways and Lucas needed to be free so he could finally hook up with Christina. Now why after just 2 episodes would you make Dr. George Forrester a bad guy? We see him for just seconds in the last episode and we are supposed to remember him in this one as someone of value? And I don’t mind following people, but not right over to the sheriff’s house. I certainly hope my Doctor is smarter then that. Wait, isn’t he the same Doctor that released Judy with a concussion in the last episode? Judy’s dad is a doctor so I guess that’s okay. In closing Christina is doing a lot of good deeds. She’s really doing a great job to fight off the evil. Keep up the good work Christina!



    EdJmoreless
  • it was ok

    10
    This is one of those episodes of a show where you know that the story had SOOO much potential and could truly have been great...but the writers simply didn't take advantage of the situation. "The Lonely Hunter" is a perfect example of this.



    The supposed main plot of this episode is that one of the local town doctors begins talking with someone who he believes is God...but it is actually Satan. He is compelled to hurt girls and believes that tonight - in which an unexpected meteor shower is going to happen - is supposed to result in something great happening, but bloodshed is required. He confesses all this to Father Thomas, but vanishes before the Father is able to identify him.



    We soon learn that the "hunter" has his eyes set on Christina. He looks at her as a thing to worship and looks for someone to sacrifice to her.



    Meanwhile, the Kramers are invited to Boyd's home for a party, along with Jessie's parents and Amber Hargrove. Things heat up as Logan's jealousy issues get out of hand, and Meg seduces her husband on the balcony to heat up their love life.



    All in all it was an entertaining episode, but the thing with Christina's worshipper was seriously underplayed while the soap opera elements were played upon too much. They could have used the guy to create a lot more suspense and action...but he didn't even do that much. It was a pretty big disappointment. But oh well hope its better next timemoreless
  • Had TONS of unused potential...

    8.5
    This is one of those episodes of a show where you know that the story had SOOO much potential and could truly have been great...but the writers simply didn't take advantage of the situation. "The Lonely Hunter" is a perfect example of this.



    The supposed main plot of this episode is that one of the local town doctors begins talking with someone who he believes is God...but it is actually Satan. He is compelled to hurt girls and believes that tonight - in which an unexpected meteor shower is going to happen - is supposed to result in something great happening, but bloodshed is required. He confesses all this to Father Thomas, but vanishes before the Father is able to identify him.



    We soon learn that the "hunter" has his eyes set on Christina. He looks at her as a thing to worship and looks for someone to sacrifice to her.



    Meanwhile, the Kramers are invited to Boyd's home for a party, along with Jessie's parents and Amber Hargrove. Things heat up as Logan's jealousy issues get out of hand, and Meg seduces her husband on the balcony to heat up their love life.



    All in all it was an entertaining episode, but the thing with Christina's worshipper was seriously underplayed while the soap opera elements were played upon too much. They could have used the guy to create a lot more suspense and action...but he didn't even do that much. It was a pretty big disappointment.moreless
  • Lucas Boyd: "You want to ruin a man, show him what's in his heart." Not much that's original, but not all bad...

    6.1
    When I consider myself a fan of a specific show, it's almost invariably because I consider myself a fan of the people behind the cameras more than those in front of the cameras. As a fan of Freaks and Geeks, I was a fan of Paul Feig and Judd Apatow, not necessarily Linda Cardellini or Busy Philips. With Buffy, Angel, and Firefly, I was a fan of Joss Whedon, Jane Espenson, Jeff Bell, et. al., not Sarah Michelle Gellar, David Boreanaz or Nathan Fillion. (Although my love of Firefly was not at all hurt by the presence of Ron Glass. Not only is he a wonderful actor, but he takes me back to those nights as a kid when I watched Barney Miller with my parents and had a huge crush on Max Gail.) David Lynch was The Man when it came to Twin Peaks, not Kyle MacLachlan. So, when a new show comes from someone whose previous work has impressed me, I put it down as a "must-see." That's how I viewed Point Pleasant before the first episode ever aired, and that's why I will continue to watch despite my disappointment at the overall quality of the show to date. As a fan of the creative team behind the show, I'm pleased to be able to say that the show seems to improve with every episode—as demonstrated in "The Lonely Hunter". Unfortunately, the episode also reveals why the show still leaves a lot to be desired.



    I like to accentuate the positive, so I'll start with the things that worked in the episode. I noted last week that Ben Edlund's script had much stronger dialogue than the first two episodes. "The Lonely Hunter" improved even further in that department, as co-executive producer Andrea Newman's script contained flashes of intelligent, interesting dialogue. One of my favorite bits of dialogue was during the scene of Christina and Judy walking on the beach. After running into Jesse, Judy kids Christina about her claims that there is no "vibe" between Jesse and herself. Christina replies in an exasperated tone, "There was no vibe there. It was vibe-less!" Judy laughs, "No, but the effort was epic." The interchange was almost Whedon-like. This wasn't a major scene, and the actresses didn't try to make it more important than it was. That made it work even better. I also liked when Judy dismisses Paula's pain by saying, "That girl is too skinny to feel pain." There were a few instances of this improved dialogue, mostly in scenes with Elisabeth Harnois, Aubrey Dollar, or Grant Show. It's just a let-down to see those flashes of improvement intertwined with trite and obvious lines in other scenes.



    There were some interesting changes in the dialogue, however. I watch most shows with my TV's closed captioning feature turned on. Especially when I'm writing a review of the episode, I like to get all of the dialogue and check spellings of character names and the like. Since the captions for most scripted episodic television are based on a (early) draft of the script, it's usually a pretty accurate way to go. On occasion, it's also interesting to see how dialogue changes between the time the draft was written and the final airing of the show. Words are often changed or even eliminated, and it's a cool way to follow the creative process. Some people may find the captions annoying, but I find the trade-off to be worthwhile a lot of the time. "The Lonely Hunter" was one of those episodes that had some really interesting changes reflected in the difference between the spoken dialogue and the closed captions. The most interesting change in dialogue occurred during the confessional scene where the serial killer is speaking to the priest. We hear the penitent say, "I've always thought about hurting girls. But...but...it's different. He's chosen one." However, the captions read, "I look at girls, and I want to hurt them. But now he's chosen one. She needs to suffer and die for our sins." The most important change here is the deletion of the final sentence, which turn "her"—presumably Christina—into a messianic figure. I found the scene interesting because the killer seems to believe that his "orders" are coming from god. When he leaves the confessional, he tells the priest, "God is my counsel. He wants...mutilation." Later, when he pledges himself to Christina, he tells her that he has come to help her, and that others will come and form her army. It poses an interesting question: Are his "orders" coming from god or the devil? There's been a lot of talk that her power could be used for good as well as evil, so it's something to ponder. Later, he explicitly states that he realizes that he's working on the side of evil, so I think this may have led to some confusion and the line was eliminated; I kind of like the philosophical questions involved if it had been left in. There are a couple more instances in the episode when the captions don't match the spoken lines, but this was the most interesting one.



    Besides the improved dialogue, I also enjoyed the performances of some of the actors. As usual, Harnois and Show did great jobs with their characters. I also think Dollar does a very good job as Judy. I was absolutely thrilled to see Adam Busch's name in the opening credits—although that weird beard simply must go. It's just unnerving. Most of the actors playing the adult characters are all believable enough, as well. Although I don't find the character of Amber all that compelling, I think Dina Meyer does a good job with a character that's little more than a stereotype.



    Unfortunately, this is where we start getting into some of the negatives from the episode. Apart from Harnois and Dollar, the rest of the "kids" are absolutely terrible actors. While I hadn't been terribly impressed by any of them in the first three episodes, I wasn't fully aware just how bad Cameron Richardson (as Paula) and (especially) Sam Page (as Jesse) were until their break-up scene. Now, to be fair, this was one part of the episode where the dialogue was exceptionally weak—incredibly trite and clumsy. That can't be completely blamed for just how terrible the scene turned out, unfortunately. I didn't believe that these two characters had ever felt anything for each other. Not only do I find myself bored by all of the "romantic" relationships on the show, but there is not one iota of chemistry between these two actors. To make it worse, the reading of their lines was stilted and flat. They told me about their feelings, they didn't show me.



    That wasn't the first time I've felt that the actors on the show have been telling me instead of showing me, either. Over and over, one character or another tells us that everything has suddenly gotten weird in Point Pleasant. Nothing that I've seen really makes me feel that things are weird. It's almost like they think they're doing a radio play, and they don't need to actually show the viewers what's happening. The writers are trying to create a mood with words alone, and it just isn't working.



    There were other points in the episode that I found the dialogue a bit wanting, as well. I cringed when Boyd tells Wes that he wants to "see what makes these people tick. You know...like a bomb." Was the last sentence really necessary? It seemed like another attempt to create a feeling of foreboding with words alone. Again, don't just tell me, show me. It's too bad that little things like that take away from the improved dialogue in other parts of the show.



    I also found the shots of space and of the meteor shower wanting. The opening sequence, when the camera swoops in from outer space, approaches the moon and Earth, then goes through the clouds to the Point Pleasant church looked like the opening of The Simpsons. They were obviously trying to get across a metaphor—i.e., forces from beyond are crashing down on Point Pleasant, just like the "weird," "unexpected," "strange" meteor shower—but I couldn't help but wonder who the animator was. Let's just say it didn't add to the atmosphere of the episode.



    While FOX is doing its best to put a positive spin on the show—the "newest hit," the ads screamed all week—the show is really flagging in the ratings. It's one thing to finish behind ABC, CBS, and NBC in a really tough time slot. It's quite another to also drop behind "WWE Smackdown!" on UPN. I really wanted this show to work, and I actually enjoy some aspects of it, but I completely understand why more people aren't watching. Viewers who may not be fans of the earlier work done by the people behind this show are unlikely to be impressed by what they've seen so far. That really disappoints me.



    [Note: Again, much of this review makes sense only in the context of having been written immediately after the episode aired. I chose to simply reproduce it "as is" from TVTome.]moreless
Susan Nash

Susan Nash

Woman

Guest Star

Dana Davis

Dana Davis

Lucinda

Guest Star

John Diehl

John Diehl

David Burke

Guest Star

Clare Carey

Clare Carey

Sarah Parker

Recurring Role

Alex Carter

Alex Carter

Logan Parker

Recurring Role

Marcus Coloma

Marcus Coloma

Father Tomas

Recurring Role

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