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Profiler

Season 2 Episode 7

Jack Be Nimble, Jack Be Quick

0
Aired Saturday 10:00 PM Jan 03, 1998 on NBC
9.3
out of 10
User Rating
25 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Jack Be Nimble, Jack Be Quick
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Once the prime suspect in the 'Old Acquaintance' murder mystery is found dead, Sam (Ally Walker) determines that one of her friends, Greg or Monica , is the likely killer.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • One third of the way through season two and Profiler continues to stumble badly

    5.5
    In an episode this rudderless, it's difficult to pick the a-story. One of the jokes about "Murder, She Wrote" was simply that no matter where Jessica Fletcher went, someone got killed. We have a plot hole the size of Texas in this episode. We're supposed to accept that an incredibly shrewd attorney who covers a crime up with clinical care is going to not be able to wait a week before killing someone? He's going to rush to do it while an FBI profiler is in the hotel? Seriously? The resolution of the Old Acquaintance murder happens rather oddly. Sam is looking through the list of friends and figuring out how their relationships worked. There's even a scene in which Sam and Angel go Nancy Drew and sneak around the big empty inn with flashlights that harkens back to the old style murder mystery. The victim's husband (Drew) was someone Sam never really liked; he tells her he hated his wife. He's of course of found dead. That leaves only one possible suspect - the attorney Greg who sam observes always cleaned up Drew's messes. She confronts him, he pulls a gun, Malone shots him. The confrontation was a cheat - Sam proposes to him that if he splits the money he and Drew stole with her, she'll let it go. it's supposed to shock the viewers but it's too transparently a ploy to be believable. The summary way the episode dealt with the "hostile local law enforcement" was frustrating; that character has long been stock in trade for any FBI show and it's a character Profiler is using entirely too often.



    The b-story involves the neverending saga of Jack. After a half-hearted attempt to reboot the Jack story, Profiler has return to bad habits and is dragging the viewers through endless and repetitive blue tinted scenes of Jack doing sneaky things. They've expanded this by having Sam and the VCTF team have repetitive conversations about Jack. We get repeated scenes of Malone saying, "Expand the search area, put more officers on the street" or Grace saying, "I'm sure he's in pain. He can't survive." The Jack story has always presented Profiler with an unsolvable puzzle - it is the black hole from which the series can't escape.



    Other story lines include Malone's now slutty 18 year old daughter unsuccessfully trying to seduce John Grant and the VCTF replacing one underused black guy with another. The episode ends with Jack returning home to be cared for by his wealthy mother (played with chilling distance by Louise Fletcher).



    We're a third of the way through the season and Profiler is stumbling badly. I'm surprised at the problem. At the end of Season one, Profiler seemed to have sorted itself out and was prepared to launch in a strong, new direction. Season two has shown some indications of that but the show remains mired in a mix of problems - storylines that aren't gelling, an inability to focus on plot and character and ultimately a weakness in the two central characters - Sam and Jack - that is undermining the ability to move forward.moreless
Ally Walker

Ally Walker

Dr. Samantha "Sam" Waters

Dennis Christopher

Dennis Christopher

Jack of All Trades / Albert Newquay

Erica Gimpel

Erica Gimpel

Angel Brown

Heather McComb

Heather McComb

Frances Malone

Julian McMahon

Julian McMahon

Det. John Grant

Peter Frechette

Peter Frechette

George Fraley

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