Republic of Doyle

Follow
CBC (ended 2014)

USER EDITOR

Stig14

User Score: 1319

Republic of Doyle
8.0
out of 10
User Rating
76 votes
3

SHOW REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Show Summary

Jake Doyle and his father Malachy run a private investigations agency in St. John's, Newfoundland. Their cases involve them in all sorts of dealings, not all of them on the right side of the law. Complicating matters on the personal front is Nikki, Jake's soon-to-be ex-wife; she is just one of the many women that Jake can't seem to stay away from. Another complication is the sexy, new police constable in town, Leslie Bennett, with whom Jake has an on-again, off-again relationship. Malachy's life should be running smoothly, as his live-in love, Rose, helps out at home and at the office, but Rose has secrets of her own that she's keeping. Malachy's grand-daughter, Tinny, also lives at home, and her teenage rebelliousness wrecks havoc on everyone, but she also proves surprisingly helpful with investigations. Rounding out the crew is Des Courtenay, a local tagger who started out as a thorn in Jake's side but ends up being a valuable aide in the business. After a successful first season, the second season began filming in St. John's on July 5, 2010. On August 31, 2010, Gemini Nominations were announced; season 1 of Republic of Doyle was nominated for: - Allan Hawco - Best Actor in a Dramatic Series (The Fall of the Republic) - Lynda Boyd - Best Actress in a Dramatic Series (He Sleeps With The Chips) - Rachel Wilson - Best Supporting Actress in a Dramatic Series (Return Of The Grievous Angel/Blood Is Thicker Than Blood) - Michael Storey - Best Photography in a Dramatic Series (The Fall of the Republic) - Republic of Doyle - Best Dramatic Series.

In January, 2011, season 2 began, moving from the 8 p.m. spot to the 9 p.m. spot.

In February, 2011, it was announced that the show had been renewed for a third season.

In January, 2012, Season 3 began, keeping the Wednesday, 9 p.m. spot.

In January, 2013, season 4 began, with the show moving from its Wednesday slot to Sundays at 9 p.m.

In October, 2013, season 5 began, with the show moving back to the Wednesday night slot at 9 p.m.

moreless
Wednesday
No results found.
Thursday
No results found.
Friday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Must be getting harder to write good scripts......

    2.0
    I disagree with other reviewers. This show's best season has come and gone. The second season saw a downgrade in writing and plot, grasping for just plain goofy stuff that was hard to upgrade with good acting. It's maintained second-season status since then. It needs better writers; it's redundant, poorly-executed and, well again... just plain goofy. A little less goof, a little more entertainment, please.



    "Lame" seems too harsh an adjective in view of Hawco's talents and energy, so I'll settle for "weak".



    Honey, hand me the remote. I've had enough of Doyle.moreless
  • Wonderfully original (or at least tnederly borrowed) Canadian dramedy.

    8.5
    This week I finally got off my duff and contributed some viewership to a good cause: Canadian Television. There are way more selfish reasons to be choosing or not choosing to watch shows from Canada, but I include supporting the industry and the thousands of jobs it generates here. I can understand that participating on the continuing dialogue of the Canadian identity doesn't rate as high on the priority list as, say, engaging in a show that actually captures your imagination regardless of where it was made, and that's why it's so important to keep digging around to find something that jives. Trailer Park Boys was a great discovery, Intelligence too, I'd even count This Hour Has 22 Minutes as one too. I suppose this is why I got so excited after watching Republic Of Doyle and realising that I'd really like to watch it again.



    When I first saw the ads for this show, I thought it was a Canadian production of a story taking place in Ireland somewhere. Goes to show how far astray I've gone from my roots since moving to the West Coast. Yeah, this dramedy police procedural is set in St John's, Newfoundland - except it's St John's is painted with a bit of a Boston brush - or at least the Boston the world knows from The Departed; lots of musical accents that bear a suspicious resemblance to The Dropkick Murphy's "Shipping Off to Boston", assorted shady characters, all of whom know each other, stuff like that.



    The Doyle of this particular Republic is bit of a scoundrel named Jake who makes up one third of a family run private detective agency. Much like Han Solo, Doyle has a cool conveyance (it's a 1968 GTO instead of the Millenium Falcon), a charming swagger and a tendency to succeed despite mild ineptitude. He's got women problems in the form of his unstable wife that he's in the midst of divorcing, and the attractive police constable that hampers his investigations while rebuffing his romantic advances. It might be trying a little too hard to be sexy - its write-up mentions Rescue Me, and I think that's an unrealistic comparison to make as far as raciness. Regardless, the jokes are on the nose and they keep coming.



    The show is funny, fast paced and unspeakably East Coast. Republic of Doyle's got everything going for it The Beachcombers had, and more. They've even got a revolving door of Canadian guests stars (I think all the 22 Minutes cast get a chance at bat, and Intelligence's Ian Tracey is in the too) so they can maintain the cancon an still deliver an original shuffle of familiar elements to create something new and fun. If there's one thing the Newfies know how to do it's finding humour in the midst of tragedy, so could a comedy about a murder sleuth have a better setting than this.



    And the best thing about it? It just got renewed for a second season. Meaning that beyond the remaining 6 episodes of the first season left to air, there's another 12 or so to come after that.moreless
  • In the Canadian comedy tradition of "Corner Gas" and "Slings and Arrows"...

    9.0
    ...comes the latest smart comedy called "Republic of Doyle".



    Set in Newfoundland, this well executed but wickedly funny tale of a family of Private Investigators manages to hit all the right case notes, all the right character flaw notes, and deal with the "Newfie" card without being glib or trite. Allan Hawco (also a co-creator) as Jake Doyle is perfectly cast as the smooth but not as smooth as he thinks he is son of an ex cop who goes into the investigative business with dear old Dad, played with equal brilliance by Sean McGinley.



    It is really fun to watch them take on their weekly case in a professional manner while dealing with life in general; none of the latter being in any way normal or under control.



    Guest stars, some recurring, like Nicholas Campbell and Gordon Pinsent round out the thoroughly enjoyable experience. It does my heart good to discover a comedy-of-sorts that I will watch in this age of lowest common denominator humour. Thanks Canada!



    ...and if I may be entirely superficial for one moment: Allan Hawco is a cutie! ;o}moreless
More
Less