Rome

Season 1 Episode 2

How Titus Pullo Brought Down the Republic

2
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM Sep 04, 2005 on HBO
9.0
out of 10
User Rating
418 votes
12

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
Anointed People's Tribune by Caesar, Mark Antony returns to Rome with Octavian's liberators, Vorenus and Pullo. After being feted by a grateful Atia, Vorenus heads home to his family, for the first time in eight years, while Pullo heads for the brothels. Pompey drafts an ultimatum stripping the general of his power.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • How Titus Pullo Brought Down the Republic

    10
    How Titus Pullo Brought Down the Republic was a perfect and very entertaining episode of Rome and I really enjoyed watching this episode because there was a lot of character and plot development, action, intrigue and drama along with some steamy scenes of passion and lust. I think the writers did an excellent job of giving enough background for the family of Vorenus and adding some drama to the mix with the last scenes revelation. This episode show cases one of the reasons I like the series so much, because of how intricate and detailed every thing is, including the actors who have created characters that viewers are instantly drawn to and care for, and some you either love, hate or love to hate. This episode was awesome and I look forward to watching what happens next!!!!!!!!!moreless
  • Review

    9.0
    With growing political tensions at home, Caesar needs a voice within the Senate, and Mark Antony is not above accepting the gift of a bought office. Escorting the new "Tribune of the People" to Rome, Vorenus and Pullo return to their homes for the first time in years: Vorenus to his family, and Pullo to his vices. Atia rewards those who return her lost son to her. In the back rooms of Rome powerful men strike bargains to strip Caesar of his growing power, and in growing political tensions of Rome the actions of the basest of men will shake the foundations of the city. Exellent episode, bloody brilliant.moreless
  • Boss.

    9.3
    With growing political tensions at home, Caesar needs a voice within the Senate, and Mark Antony is not above accepting the gift of a bought office. Escorting the new "Tribune of the People" to Rome, Vorenus and Pullo return to their homes for the first time in years: Vorenus to his family, and Pullo to his vices. Atia rewards those who return her lost son to her. In the back rooms of Rome powerful men strike bargains to strip Caesar of his growing power, and in growing political tensions of Rome the actions of the basest of men will shake the foundations of the city. Exellent episode, bloody brilliant.moreless
  • A look into the inner workings of Roman Politics

    9.3
    This episode gives us a look into Roman politics with Caesar electing Mark Antony as Tribune of the Plebes. This gives him veto power over the senate's motion to demand Caesar return to Rome and face trial or be named an enemy of Rome. Unfortunately his veto does not get exercised after a group of Pompey's men decide to attack which sends Caesar on his way back to Rome. This episode also sees Pullo and Vorenus part ways. Pullo makes his way to the brothels and after an altercation ends up with a severe head injury. Vorenus returns home after eight years and is instantly frustrated with what he finds. His wife questions all his decisions and his young daughter has just had a child. It doesn't help that Vorenus does not approve of the child's father either.moreless
  • This episode serves the purpose of showing the life of Lucius Vorenus and his return to his family after eight years of seperation.

    8.9
    This episode is a good one to further the plot, but does not show the true essence of the story. It includes the return of Lucius Vorenus to his family for which he has been seperated from for eight years because of conquests in Gaul. The story reveals an important detail in the relationship between Lucius and his wife. While he was away at war in Gaul, his wife believed him to be dead and thus she had a very intimate affair with her sister's husband, a relationship which produced a child. Immediately upon her husband's suprise return she tells her oldest daughter to reveal to her father that the child is hers so not to have problems with Lucius. The episode reveals the great story with some very profound and memorable acting by the key actors of the series. It is a vital episode for viewers of the show to watch because of it's importance in developing the story.moreless
Robert Purvis

Robert Purvis

Glabius

Guest Star

Leslie Csuth

Leslie Csuth

Milo

Guest Star

Matt Patresi

Matt Patresi

Durio

Guest Star

Manfredi Aliquo

Manfredi Aliquo

Castor

Recurring Role

Lydia Biondi

Lydia Biondi

Merula

Recurring Role

Ian McNeice

Ian McNeice

Newsreader

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (4)

    • Historical Trivia:

      Doctor: You might try an offering to Spes.

      The doctor advises Vorenus to make an offering to the Roman goddess of hope, Spes. She is often defined as "the last goddess," meaning hope is all that is left.

    • Historical Trivia:

      Atia: I feel like Helen of Troy.

      Helen of Troy was considered to be the most beautiful woman in the world. Many powerful men sought her hand in marriage. When she fleed her eventual husband to be with Paris, a trojan prince, her husband was furious thus bringing on the Trojan War.

    • Historical Trivia:

      Julius Caesar: You look just right as you are, like Leonidas at Thermopylae.

      Julius Caesar goes on to describe how Mark Antony and 50 soldiers were attacked by a group of a thousand Pompeians. He compares this to the Battle of Thermopylae. In this battle, King Leonidas I and 300 soldiers held off thousands of Persians so the Greeks could prepare for the Battle of Salamis. The Battle of Thermopylae is considered one of the most famous last stands in history.

    • Historical Trivia:

      Although not mentioned in the episode, in history as Caesar crossed the Rubicon, the place where he should have given up his Imperium, he said "Iacta alea est" which either means "the die is cast" The definition means that Caesar has taken an irrevocable action (i.e. Crossing the Rubicon). From this point on there was no going back.

  • QUOTES (4)

    • Niobe: I don't want people dying in my house.

    • Lucius Vorenus: The republic should remain as it was at the founding of the republic, why should that change?
      Gaius Octavian: Because the Roman people are suffering, because slaves have taken all the work, because nobles have taken all the land, and because the streets are filled with the homeless and the starving.

    • Caesar: The business of motivating me to fight is a tricky matter, Posca. I would not expect a slave to understand the subtleties.

    • Pullo: I'm going to drink all the wine, smoke all the smoke, and fuck every whore in the city.

  • NOTES (2)

    • Mark Anthony sits vigil (very impatiently) in the temple of Jupiter Maximus as part of his investiture as Tribune of the Plebes

      Jupiter Maximus was the supreme God of the Roman pantheon and was the patron deity of Laws, Social Order, and Rome itself. This seems a very appropriate God to traditionally appeal to when one is becoming a high government official.

    • Roman Republican Government: The Tribune of the Plebs

      Mark Anthony is elected Tribune of the Plebes, one of 10 officers of the Plebeian Assembly which was one of the two ruling bodies of Rome, given over the common people of Rome, as the Senate was given over the Patrician classes. (In case you're wondering, yes the government of the Roman Republic was very complicated, and sometimes contradictory).

      The Plebeian Assembly had as much power as the Senate in many areas of Roman politics - in fact part of the political destabilization of Rome leading up to the time of this series arises from the growing practice of political factions to bypass the Senate entirely and simply use the Plebeian Assembly to enact their proposed laws.

      The Tribune of the Plebes could convene the Senate, and propose legislation before it - as well as before the Plebeian Assembly. However, the power of the Tribune of the Plebes seems to be mostly negative in that a Tribune of the Plebes had a veto by which he could stop any proposed vote, law, trial, or proposed action, even those of a Consul! It is Anthony's power of veto that is crucial in this episode.

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

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