Rome

Season 2 Episode 2

Son of Hades

1
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM Jan 21, 2007 on HBO
9.3
out of 10
User Rating
232 votes
7

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Cleopatra arrives in Rome to pay her homage to Caesar, and to seek legitimization for Caesarion. Egypt's queen causes further complications between Anthony and Atia, who still struggles with Servilia. Timon's brother arrives from Jerusalem. The death of Erastes throws the underworld, and Rome's river commerce into chaos, and Pullo and Vorenus step into the gap. Octavian and Anthony begin a long and bitter rivalry with a dispute over Caesar's will and sharing of power.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Vorenus

    10
    The kids are alive!
  • Son of Hades

    10
    Son of Hades was a perfect episode of Rome's second season and I really enjoyed watching this episode as Marc Anthony stepped in to force Vorenus to come back to life, Cleopatra visits Rome, and Atia hosts a party for her. It was interesting to see Octavian so bravely confront Marc Anthony about the money Caeser left to him. The last scene was sad and touching, and gives some hope. I look forward to watching the next episode!!!!!!!!!moreless
  • Interesting development of Octavian!!!

    9.7
    I liked this episode mostly due to the antithesis shown here between Octavian and Marc Anthony..Octavian is viewed as a ordinary teenager, who will be no match for Marc Anthony...He is grossly underestimated because the truth is that Octavian is a very intelligent guy, a fact that one can observe even from the first episode...Marc Anthony, although is portrayed in some movies as a merciful and skilled leader, here is shown as a drunkard, who takes bad decisions, and because of him the Roma republic is in chaos...Cleopatra comes to Rome in an attempt to have her son legitimated as one of Caesar's heirs...Another fact i liked was the behaviour of Atia...She is a very devious woman and go to such length as a peace with Servilia...This episode ends with the flight of Octavian due to his decision to enter politics and his serious argument with his mother and Marc Anthony...Vorenus and Titus Pullo get hold of Erastes bar, they reunite all the captains of the bands of the Underworld and they make them accept the leadership of Vorenus...Vorenus loses his identity and is portrayed here as a man with nothing to lose...But i think that until the end he will redeem himself.moreless
  • Okay, this time: it is better than sex...

    10
    Again : Oh my GOD ! This show ! ! ! It was so cool. Again, you can feel all the hate between Anthony and Octavius explode. I love the way, Octavius, even if he doesn't count as a fighter, find a way to keep his honor by telling Antohy that he doesn't know how to lead Rome ! What a fight (with the hands [Anthony] and the words [Octavius]) ! Will the pen will be stronger than the sword ? Those of us who know History already know how it ends, but for the rest of the people...what a suspens !



    Just a word about Lucius, who's becoming some kind of a Punisher now that he lost everything ("What can the gods do to me now ?" as he says) and becoming as dark as someone can be !



    Will it ends with him againt Pullo (oh god, I have to stop, this is too powerful...) ? Again, it will be the 6 longest days to waint until Sunday...Start counting seconds now...518400, 518399, 518398...moreless
  • Outstanding episode. The last scene...

    10
    Really unbeliveble that the producers could mantaint the story line, scenario and actors in the same way they looked a couple of year ago (except for Octavian). The way the episode navegates among the Historical facts, the Storical miths and the pure fiction is really ground-breaking in the television history. Who didnt spent the more than one year wondering what would happen with Tito and Lucius... and the comments of Brutus after killing Cesar (if he had said the famous quote or not). The scenario looks outstanding as used to be, and the last scene shows all it's value to the story.moreless
Rafi Gavron

Rafi Gavron

Duro

Guest Star

Nigel Lindsay

Nigel Lindsay

Levi

Guest Star

Nicolò Brecci

Nicolò Brecci

Caesarion

Guest Star

Zuleikha Robinson

Zuleikha Robinson

Gaia

Recurring Role

Lyndsey Marshal

Lyndsey Marshal

Cleopatra

Recurring Role

Michael Nardone

Michael Nardone

Mascius

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (2)

    • Timon's brother Levi left Jerusalem while Phasael was Governor of the city. During this time there were frequent conflicts between the supporters of the Hasmonean Antigonus and the supporters of Phasael. Phasael was Idumaean and even though his family had converted to judaism they were disliked by the perspicacious and nationalist Jews for their perceived non-Jewish and Arab ancestry.

      So Levi fleeing from Jerusalem is historically acurate for anyone that might have been supporting the Hasmonean cause and facing persecution from Phasael or the Romans in the region.

    • The term collegium (collegia being the plural word) is a latin phrase that roughly translates to a "club" or "guild".

      Its equivalent in modern times would be about the same as the term "Union" that is used today to represent a group of people that all work in a particular profession.

  • QUOTES (14)

    • Pullo: Come through the back and say hello to Vorenus. Cheer up the old bastard.
      Mascius: Is it true what they say then, about the wife and children?
      Pullo: True enough. Not a fucking word.

    • Mark Antony: You're lucky you're still breathing boy! Do you here me? You're lucky you're still breathing!
      Octavia of the Julii: ANIMAL!
      Gaius Octavian: You're unfit to lead Rome!

    • Atia of the Julii: What sort of woman is she?
      Mark Antony: Who?
      Atia of the Julii: The Egyptian girl.
      Mark Antony: Oh her... barely met her. Skinny thing. Talks too much.
      Atia of the Julii: Well, she must have something. To lure a cold fish like Caesar.
      Mark Antony: She's a Queen. Caesar would have fucked Medusa if she'd worn a crown.

    • Antony: You've changed since we last met.
      Cleopatra: Have I seen you before?

    • Cleopatra: My son by Caesar is near four years old. He has begun to ask questions about his father.
      Antony: How touching.

    • Antony: Surely you don't think those men paid me to put their names on the list?
      Cicero: Not at all. I expect they paid Posca.

    • Antony: No man is beyond redemption, Lucius. Not even you.

    • Antony: She did ask me to formally recognise her bastard as Caesar's son.
      Atia: Blasted impudence! You refused, of course? Octavian is the only--
      Antony: Yes, yes, of course I refused. It set off a great flood of royal whining.

    • Vorenus: What more could the gods do to me? How can they punish me now?
      Pullo: Don't know, don't want to find out.

    • Vorenus: I have caused the death of my wife. I have caused the death of my children. I have caused the death of Caesar. What would you have me do now?

    • Pullo: How about a kiss?
      Eirene: You shave, I kiss.

    • Cleopatra -
      He was like a husband to me
      Mark Antony -
      Roman Consul, Egyptian wife? Wouldn't do.

    • Vorenus: I am a Son of Hades!! I fuck Concorde in her ARSE!!!

    • Atia: Die screaming you pigspawn trollop.
      Cleopatra: .......

  • NOTES (1)

    • One might note the religious sensitivity of the Roman citizen in this era. Even "thieves and cutthroats" are obviously respectful of religious authority - such as the edicts from the priests of Concorde; are shocked by Vorenus' acts of sacrilege; and are held at bay by Vorenus' claims to be allied with the Gods of the underworld. Also note Pullo's unease and objection to Vorenus' tactic, claiming that "The God's don't like that".

  • ALLUSIONS (3)

    • Hades - who Vorenus invokes to keep the Collegium cowed - was actually the Greek name for the god of the dead and the underworld. The Roman name which Vorenus should have used is Pluto. This was most likely changed because the name Hades is better known.

      Many people in Roman times feared Hades because they feared death, and the mere act of speaking his name (much less swearing oaths by Hades) was shocking. However, in Roman times, Hades did not have connotations of evil - but was a dark, morbid, morose, and passive God maintaining balance and jealously protecting and confining the souls of the dead. Medieval thought which associated Hades and the Roman underworld with Hell and Satan later added this element of evil to the idea of Hades.

      While Vorenus' claim would be shocking and fearful to Romans of the time, it would not have the same connotations as someone in a Christian era claiming to be a "Son of Satan".

    • Concordia (or Concord as she is referred to in this episode), was the Roman incarnation of the Greek goddess Harmonia: goddess of agreement, understanding, and marital harmony. In medieval art, she is sometimes depicted standing between two members of Royal Houses shaking hands, and this appears to be how she is depicted in the episode, although without the two "disputants" - presumably she is meant to symbolically "stand" between the disputing parties in the Collegium.

      It should be noted that not only was Concordia goddess of harmony, truce, and peace, but that the Roman Senate often met within the temple of Concordia. Invoking Concordia to preside over a meeting to resolve the civil disturbances could be seen and symbolically lending both religious and political authority to Vorenus' ultimatum to the underworld figures - doubly so as he explicitly has Anthony's political and financial backing.

    • The act of kidnapping and selling people (usually travelers) into slavery was a practice of Roman slavers, so the fate of the Vorenii children in the last scene of the episode is historically accurate - although the idea of someone coming into the house of a Roman citizen and dragging them off into slavery would have been unthinkable. This kind of slavery was later deterred by Augustus (Octavian) and his successor Tiberius, but the practice did not completely die out for at least a century following their reigns.

      See: http://www.ucd.ie/classics/classicsinfo/96/Madden96.html

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