Saturday Night Live

Season 3 Episode 13

Art Garfunkel/Stephen Bishop

0
Aired Saturday 11:30 PM Mar 11, 1978 on NBC
7.4
out of 10
User Rating
12 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
Live From New York (mouthed silently), it's... Gilda Radner!

Sketches include "Modern Crimes," "Kromega III," "Tomorrow," "Miracle In Chicago," "Stage Door Guard," "Looks At Books," a guest performance by Andy Kaufman, "Don't Look Back In Anger" (film), and "Looking For Mr. Goodbar Playset".

Stephen Bishop performs "On & On"; Art Garfunkel performed "Wonderful World," "All I Know," "Scarborough Fair," and Crying In My Sleep."moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • "I'll tell you why. 'Cause I'm a dancer!"

    7.0
    Paul Simon was a mainstay on Saturday Night Live for the first five years, making an appearance in every year but the fourth. It should be no surprise then that his old partner and friend Art Garfunkel would (attempt to) follow suit, although this would end up being his only hosting gig. Garfunkel was an interesting singer/songwriter with a very magnificent head of hair and a great voice to boot. Here he brings along Stephen Bishop as the official musical guest, but we all know that the focus from the fans watching was getting to see Art perform and to see how he fared with sketch comedy material. And here we go, delving into another old-time episode of Saturday Night Live.



    Host: Art Garfunkel

    Musical Guest: Stephen Bishop



    "Jacques Cousteau Gets an Undersea Enema"...these are classics...



    Cold Open: Modern Crimes (Aykroyd, Belushi, Murray, Radner) (2:04)



    --Based on the attempt that year to steal Charlie Chaplin's corpse from the cemetery, two grave robbers (Aykroyd & Belushi) struggle to get out of dodge with the corpse in question.



    Monologue: Sound Problems (Garfunkel, Bishop, Belushi) (4:46)



    --Art goes right into "Wonderful World" with Bishop assisting him, but has to stop when the speaker has too much feedback. Belushi then interrupts with one of his classic rants about the network not giving them proper equipment, but then segues into a rant on Garfunkel himself. Terrific way to start the show.



    Art Garfunkel sings "Wonderful World" (2:21)



    --After that little altercation, Art goes back to singing and finishes one of my favourite Sam Cooke tunes with gusto.



    Commercial: Kromega III (voice of Curtin) (1:43)



    --A repeat of a really funny commercial bit from the season premiere.



    Tomorrow (Garfunkel, Aykroyd) (4:28)



    --Tom Snyder (Aykroyd) interviews a battered husband (Garfunkel) who hides in darkness and remains anonymous until Snyder slowly reveals his identity accidentally. Another hilarious performance by Danny and a good one by Art.



    Stephen Bishop sings "On and On" (3:03)



    --With a really cool elaborate set, Bishop performs a tasty little jam that holds up next to Art's.



    Miracle in Chicago (Aykroyd, Belushi, Murray) (4:13)



    --A bartender (Aykroyd) complains to a construction worker (Murray) about the lack of Irish songs on the jukebox, but then they are interrupted by former mayor, the deceased Richard Daley (Belushi). I didn't really get what this was about. It was alright I guess.



    KISS Concert (Garfunkel, Aykroyd, Bishop, Belushi, Curtin, Morris, Murray, Newman, Davis) (4:28)



    --Steve Parrish (Belushi), a security guard at a KISS concert, stops several people from entering backstage including Angus Stanley (Garfunkel), Jerry Eldini (Murray), Stephen Bishop, and more. Funny ensemble sketch.



    Weekend Update with Dan Aykroyd and Jane Curtin (9:22)



    --Dan delivers a great visual gag about Orson Welles and more reference is made to Charlie Chaplin's missing corpse, while Jane has her moment announcing the death of Hippo Bubbles. Garrett Morris comes by to talk of a virus while a Mighty Mouse cartoon plays and then Bill Murray stops by to review "Coming Home" in his usual smarmy, hilarious way. Good stuff this time.



    Art Garfunkel sings "All I Know" & "Scarborough Fair" (5:44)



    --Art delivers a first song that I'm not familiar with at all, but then sings a classic of his in "Scarborough Fair".



    Looks At Books (Curtin, Murray, Radner) (3:36)



    --Jane Curtin interviews Lisa (Radner) and Todd (Murray), the nerds and authors of "What Ever Happened to the Class of '77", who tell Jane "hilarious" anecdotes much to her chagrin. Again, the Nerds weren't in full comedic swing yet but this is another positive step.



    Schiller's Reel #3: Don't Look Back in Anger (Belushi) (3:50)



    --An older John Belushi visits the graves of his fellow Not Ready For Primetime Players, who have perished before him despite the bets being on him to die first. As eerie as it can get, but this is one of the best film pieces SNL's ever done.



    Andy Kaufman: 'The Great Gatsby' (+Lorne Michaels) (7:55)



    --Andy speaks with a British accent, his "natural voice", and proceeds to read 'The Great Gatsby' to the escalating hostility of the crowd. Brilliant interactive piece.



    Commercial: The Looking for Mr. Goodbar Sleepytime Playset (voice of Murray, Radner) (2:09)



    --A child (Radner) advertises for the aforementioned playtime set ("...brings gratuitous sex and violence into her little world"). It's from Mainway of course and its an enjoyable bit.



    Art Garfunkel sings "Crying In My Sleep" (3:33)



    --Artsy comes back to the stage for one more number, this melancholy tune that is rather soothing and very listenable (is that a word?).



    Art joins the cast on stage to bid adieu to everyone and there's no time for credits, so the show abruptly ends.



    Best segment: Don't Look Back in Anger

    Worst segment: Miracle in Chicago



    Host: Art Garfunkel - 7.5/10

    Musical Guest: Stephen Bishop - 8/10



    Mr. Garfunkel proved with this show that he could hold up his end on SNL just as well as Paul Simon could as he was decent in the two sketches he appeared in and also delivered some pretty entertaining musical performances. Only thing that bugged me about that is the fact that Bishop only got to perform one song (albeit a really good one) and was overshadowed by the host. Then again, Bishop also got to appear in one sketch as himself which was a really fun ensemble bit so all is not wrong. So this was a pretty solid show overall.



    Rating: 7/10moreless
Art Garfunkel

Art Garfunkel

Himself

Guest Star

Stephen Bishop

Stephen Bishop

Himself

Guest Star

Tom Davis

Tom Davis

Dr. Bob

Recurring Role

Andy Kaufman

Andy Kaufman

Himself

Recurring Role

James Downey

James Downey

Tatum O'Neill's uncle

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (1)

    • British Man: (fake British accent) So, uh, I was wondering what- what to do. What could I do in this- to fill up this twenty, twenty-five minutes? And... could I sing a song, do a dance? Then I thought, well, you know, before, I've been on the show, I've done characters, you know, like the little foreign man, foreign immigrant who goes (high-pitched, heavily accented voice of Foreign Man) "Thenk you very much. I'm very happy to be here." (British accent again) You know? And then I've done this American character, goes (Normal American accent) "Hi, I'm Andy and hello, (waves) how are you? (sings) Oh, the cow goes moo!" (British accent again) You know. And, uh... I thought instead of doing that, why don't I just come out and be straight with you and just be myself? So, so that's what...

  • NOTES (2)

    • The Tom Schiller film "Don't Look Back in Anger" is very top-heavy in historical irony. The film depicts an elderly John Belushi as the last surviving cast member of SNL, visiting the graves of his castmates. At the beginning of the short film, Belushi makes the comment that "they all thought (he) would be the first to go. I was one of those 'Live Fast, Die Young, Leave A Good-Looking Corpse' types."

    • Art Garfunkel only appeared in two sketches ("KISS Concert" and "Tomorrow") in addition to his monolouge, musical performances, and introducing Stephen Bishop and Andy Kaufman.

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

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