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Are there SNL sketches who became so famous that...

  • Avatar of concombremasque

    concombremasque

    [1]Mar 6, 2012
    • member since: 03/05/12
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    ...they became a reference in pop culture?


    At first, sorry for my bad english. I'm french.


    The snl show exists since more than 35 years and there is a lot of sketch inside. So, I suppose, some of them came to be cult. there are some which, you are in a special situation, everybody thinks at them.


    I'm not sure that I'm very clearly.


    For example (sorry, it's a french example), in a very well know french comedy (la vie est un long fleuve tranquille http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_vie_est_un_long_fleuve_tranquille), the two families who are in the movie became very cult. So cult that during a long time, the two families's surname were used to represent a uptight french catholic bourgeois (family's name Le Quesnoy) or french redneck (beauf) (family's name Groseille).


    If you don't understand what I want to say, don't hesitate to say me. Don't hesitate to correct me too.

    Edited on 03/07/2012 8:10pm
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    TheDiamondDog

    [2]Mar 6, 2012
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    Like A Boss. I see that everywhere.


    And "More Cowbell."


    Off the top of my head.

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    Woodstein

    [3]Mar 6, 2012
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    I've heard "Debbie Downer" used to describe pessimistic people on a couple occasions, so there's that.

    There are also some sketches that become ingrained into the culture to the point where people reference them not knowing where they came from. I can't think of any examples from SNL off the top of my head, but a lot of people have probably given a drawn-out "well excuuuuse me!" without being aware that Steve Martin made saying it like that a catchphrase.
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    TheDiamondDog

    [5]Mar 7, 2012
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    I know people that use "Creep/Creeping" as a reference.


    At a concert I was at this past summer, on a jumbotron-esque thing in front, you could text things up there. I remember someone texting, "This is the tale of Captain Jack Sparrow." And there was a huge applause.

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    HelloStuart

    [6]Mar 7, 2012
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    Bienvenue! Ca va? (I'm from Chicago, but I'm semi-fluent.)

    There are plenty of examples of SNL sketches transcending the show itself, though very few have achieved such public acclaim outside of Canada and the U.S. "Debbie Downer" was already in the lexicon before Rachel Dratch took on the part; from a sketch comedy perspective, it's more famous for actors breaking character. "Wayne's World," The Blues Brothers, and "Cowbell" are all excellent starting points.
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  • Avatar of concombremasque

    concombremasque

    [8]Mar 9, 2012
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    Thanks you for replies. "Wayne's World" and "The Blues Brothers" are (a little) Famous in France. SNL isn't know in France except for some people but some sketch are known like "night at the roxbury" and the Sarah Palin and the Hillary Clinton 's impressions. American comedy (or comedies, I don't know) don't really work in France. In the same time, american comedy which was adapted by french comedy didn't work in USA (except "true lies"). I don't really know why because I love both. Maybe cultural differences. In France, generally, the reference replace a other reference. It should be the same in America. Hello Stuart, if you speak french maybe you know one of this french comedy : les bronzes, les bronzes font du ski, les visiteurs, la grande vadrouille, Bienvenue chez les chtis.
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  • Avatar of Hennes81

    Hennes81

    [9]Mar 9, 2012
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    Nice to see some other Europeans interested in SNL. Here in Germany the show is mentioned a lot (i.e. I saw Lohan footage this week on two TV channels) but I think only a few people could recognize the title or know anything about it.Besides the fact that the show format was successfully adapted in the 1990s I also don't think there will ever be a direct influence to the german TV business. It also isn't shown on a free-to-air TV channel (just the 45 minute version on a pay tv cable channel with a delay of one week...).


    When I started watching SNL I only knew about the Coneheads, Waynes World and Blues Brothers since they were known for their movies. I also talked to others who knew about some specific sketches from the internet (i.e. the Lohan Hogwarts skit or DeNiros FBI cold openings) but these peole are not representative...


    Not knowing if I'm right but I would also add the "Buh-Bye" to the pop culture list in the US (heard that catchphrase in different shows as I remember) - even though it might not be as famous as "More Cowbell" (which has it's own wikipedia article...).


    Btw: Even though I don't speak french I saw the german dubbed versions of "Bienvenue chez les chtis" and "Rien à déclarer" which were both great in my mind. Also "Intouchables" is really popular in Germany (by far the most successful movie in 2012 until now).
    That in mind (and also the awards for The Artist): French movies have a strong year so far!

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