Saturday Night Live

Season 32 Episode 21

SNL in the 90s: Pop Culture Nation

0
Aired Saturday 11:30 PM May 06, 2007 on NBC
8.2
out of 10
User Rating
24 votes
3

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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SNL in the 90s: Pop Culture Nation
AIRED:
A documentary look at the long-running variety program during two seperate eras: the overpopulated early-90s cast that featured Chris Farley and Adam Sandler, and the zany late-90s cast that featured Will Ferrell and Molly Shannon.

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Saturday
10:00pm
NBC
11:30pm
NBC
Sunday
12:00pm
VH1CL
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • To Long to Fit the 90's

    7.4
    Saturday Night Live

    A sunday Saturday Night Live special that goes back to the 90's to talk about those times on SNL.The "overpopulation" of the early 90's to the gift that keeps on giving late 90's.I found noteable flaws about the program more when things aired. But i didn't want to say anything much because it really didnt matter. Although i dont know why the put the cow bell schech in 96.I was surprised on who the brought back to interview. I couldnt belive they intervired Sarah Silverman who did mostley nothing for the show.But you know she was a cast member on the show a season.I thought they could sped things faster.Gone over things that wernt really important but hay i didnt make it. All in all it was better than i excepted. Sort of.moreless
  • "Saturday Night Live in the 90's" is a retrospective look at SNL in the 90's.

    8.1
    A decent special combining a lot of memorable moments from the 90's and interviews with cast from past and present.



    An entertaining special. They go into detail about how they write up the sketches. There is a lot of Lorne Michaels here but they also interviews practically every cast member from the 90's (although the famous ones like Spade, Myers and Ferrel get more attention than others). Dana Carvey and Mike recall how they were shocked by how popular "Wayne's World" became. Michaels attributes the success of the 90's of SNL to reaching out to a younger audience. Spade recalls sharing an office with Chris Farley but being next door to the likes of Adam Sandler and Chris Rock. There's other interesting information like people saying that Lorne had no clue what Adam Sandler was driving out with his sketches with "Opera Man" but nonetheless knowning that he was on to something.



    The special goes for two hours long so you really get a lot of laughs and insight here. On the sad side, watching this it's clear how much SNL has gone down in terms of quality since the 90's. In fact it's been terrible if not average at best. It's not surprising then that people keep talking about this decade since it's clearly one of the better decades of SNL.moreless
  • Pleasantly surprising special.

    8.5
    I was surprised by this NBC special on its pop culture sketch show. Usually, these specials are designed to promote "great moments" from the show and reveal little. However, this episode was refreshingly honest. Stars from the 90's version of SNL share favorite sketches and backstage stories. I was impressed that these weren't the sketches you see all the time--for example Jimmy Fallon shares on of his fave sketches from 1995 where the men of SNL kill themselves off in polar bear cage. Each sketch is carefully selected to match with a backstage story. Sometimes the sketches illustrate talent, things that didn't work, or are symbolic of the 1990s. Music clips of artists that played the show are also used to illustrate the same concepts (some of the songs are clearly subtle commentaries on the stories being told--very clever).



    The cast and crew are brutally honest about network pressures that lead to cast changes. They share their dismay at the deaths of Hartman and Farley (I was surprised to see that the clip of Phil Hartman singing goodbye and cuddling Chris Farley was NOT played). Cast members share how they were discovered and how they created signature characters.



    Overall, I was extremely happy with this retrospective. The mood of the show remains lighthearted and upbeat, but it doesn't try and hide the darker side of SNL.moreless
Tim Herlihy

Tim Herlihy

Himself

Guest Star

Don Ohlmeyer

Don Ohlmeyer

Himself

Guest Star

David Spade

David Spade

(Himself)

Cameo

Lorne Michaels

Lorne Michaels

Himself

Recurring Role

Adam McKay

Adam McKay

Himself

Recurring Role

James Downey

James Downey

Himself

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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