Seinfeld

Season 9 Episode 24

The Finale (2)

5
Aired Thursday 9:00 PM May 14, 1998 on NBC
7.9
out of 10
User Rating
275 votes
36

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Episode Summary

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The Finale (2)
AIRED:
Jerry, George, Elaine and Kramer stand trial, defended by Jackie Chiles. Character witnesses are called from the show's nine seasons, and the four are sentenced to a year in prison.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Totally an F.you to fans.

    1.0
    I think a better way to have ended it would be that the gang is found NOT GUILTY, the courtroom erupts into an angry mob. They chase our "heroes" (a term I use loosely.) out of the courthouse, to the air port, where their plane is read. They get in and take off before the mob gets them.



    As they are flying they drink champaign, and celebrate. The Pilot announces for everyone to take their seats because they are flying into some fog. As they do, the continue drinking. Jerry Holds up his glass to make a toast, and says, "NOTHING CAN STOP US NOW!!!" Cut to the plane crashing into the side of a mountain, (LIke in the movie "Sweet Dreams." ) Silence, show a card thanking the fans.



    During the closing credits, Jerry is doing his stand up...in Hell.moreless
  • Just really stupid

    1.0
    What a bad episode, I really think it was the worst of the whole series. It just didn't come off, we're meant to beleive that the four of them got sent to prison for not helping in a robbery/holdup situation? It just didn't seem true. And it also didn't ring true with the way the characters were acting. The episode was so completely different from all of the rest of the series, the show was meant to be about nothing for goodness sake, it should not have ended like this. I lot of criminals don't even get sent to prison for a first offence, so I really doubt anyone would get sent to prison for not helping a robbery victim.moreless
  • we say goodbye the senfeld. as they all go to prison

    10
    in the final season of seinfeld this is one of the best i have seen. while the four of them are away on a trip they come to this town and see a fat man been car jacked. they stand there laughing. then they get arrested. at there trial which is very good we see all the people who have been on the show. and we get flash backs of each episode. one line that i found funny is when jackie looks at jerry and says you have a nick name of eveyone dont you. its good to see them all back again a great farewell to a great show.moreless
  • If there's ever an episode of anything that needs no introduction; it's the final, one - hour long episode of Seinfeld.

    7.0
    Jerry and George's show "Jerry" has been picked up and the network's given them a big deal and their private plane and the gang decide to go on a final trip to Paris. When (thanks to Kramer) the plane is forced to land in a small Massachussets town. They're jailed for not helping someone in need because of the Good Samaritan law. When the "New York 4" are in court; they face time in prison and it's up to testimony from everyone from each of Jerry, George, Elaine and Kramer's past to decide their fate.



    While the avid Seinfeld fan in me relishes anything churned out from the great series; there's no denying that this episode is high on padding and budget but low on coming up with a proper send - off for the finest sitcom ever.



    There are some funny scenes at erratic moments but so much time is dedicated to tying up every loose end there's not much time for jokes. The "Good Samaritan Law" twist comes off a little forced and the whole inflated trial just seems so contrived with the fact that every possible side character appears but not one of them offers any testimony to keep their friends from prison.



    The budget is obviously gigantic with an abudance of sets, scenes and props that most movies can't boast but by doing so the low - key charm from the early seasons that relied on only the four main characters to make it work is really obscured.



    Speaking of which; the performances from Jerry, George, Elaine and Kramer are all scene - chewing as there's the sense that every second counts and they can't waste one but Kramer just gets painful over time. The long list of guest stars from their past is a very effective touch but there are some very noticable omissions from the 180 episodes which could've, should've and would've been rectified.



    All in all; this cop out of a finale leaves a bitter taste in our mouth meaning watching any repeat episodes after this is hard when you think of how abrubtly and chaotically it ends but once you get over the initial shock you just enjoy what this has to offer.moreless
  • So many people say that this was the wrong way to end the series. I, however, have always seen it as the perfect way to end the show. It brought back the best characters of the series and ended the characters' storylines in an appropriate way: in jail.moreless

    10
    So many people say that this was the wrong way to end the series. I, however, have always seen it as the perfect way to end the show. It brought back the best characters of the series and ended the characters' storylines in an appropriate way: in jail. They were not good people, and bringing back the best characters proved that. The series was brought full circle with the button comment at the end, and the series ended with standup, just as it started. The episode was never meant to be just another episode of Seinfeld, because it was the finale. It was big, exciting, and, most importantly, funny. I felt it was the perfect send off for the greatest sitcom of all time, and perhaps even my favorite episode overall. For those who disagree, you probably never loved the show that much to begin with...moreless
Stanley Anderson

Stanley Anderson

Judge Arthur Vandelay

Guest Star

Frances Bay

Frances Bay

Mabel Choate

Guest Star

David Byrd

David Byrd

Roger

Guest Star

Peter Blood

Peter Blood

Jay Crespi

Recurring Role

Warren Frost

Warren Frost

Henry Ross

Recurring Role

Jane Leeves

Jane Leeves

Marla

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (12)

    • Goof: Marla says that she dated Jerry in October of 1992, but it was actually November when they dated.

    • After the foursome is arrested, The Latham Ledger has a headline of "Jackie Chiles Set To Defend N.Y. Four In Samaritan Trial". If you take a very close look at the newspaper, you'll see that it's dated May 14th, 1998...which is the same date that this episode aired during its original run.

    • Goof: Elaine casually mentions that the Soup Nazi's soup isn't all that good, but back in the episode "The Soup Nazi," Elaine loved the soup so much, she couldn't even stand.

    • The doctor who informed George of Susan's death testified that George's reaction to the news was "restrained jubilation". However, in Season 7's "The Invitations", George did not react at all in that manner. He reaction was more surprised but indifferent.

    • It was mentioned that the "Bubble Boy" testified against the foursome. However, this seems unlikely. It was actually Susan who punctured his bubble, and he had been choking George at the time. Furthermore, considering that he is unable to leave his bubble, it is difficult to understand how he could have been a witness.

    • It is revealed that the Soup Nazi's real name is actually Yev Kassem.

    • The reporter mentions some of the witnesses that the jury will likely find compelling, and mentions "the woman they sold the defective wheelchair to". This alludes to Season 4's "The Handicap Spot." However, in that episode, they bought the wheelchair for her to replace her other one. Although it was still poor taste to buy a used wheelchair, they simply gave it to her.

    • According to the 'leaving from NY' montage it is revealed that Mickey and David Puddy live one door away from each other.

    • In this episode we see Mr. Wilhelm and Mr. Steinbrenner talking comfortably with each other while eating lunch. Even though they seem to have parted ways on bad terms when Steinbrenner spontaneously fired him in "The Millennium".

    • Elaine says, "I've always loved yo-" [plane levels out, they land] "I've always loved U-nited Airlines". Cut in syndication. This is because when the finale original aired it was 75-90 minutes long. They could have split "The Finale" into 3 parts for syndication.

    • I noticed people have been posting edits made when an episode is in syndication. Well, there are A LOT of scenes missing from this episode when it's run in syndication. I distinctly remember seeing the Bubble Boy in this epsiode (I remeber, police guards had a difficult time getting him through the doorway), but he's not there, when this episode airs nowadays. Many of the other witnesses (Keith Hernandaz, and many others) are cut out. Plus, it seems to me that the footage with Marla Penny (Jane Leeves) was reshot. When this epsiode airs, Marla tells the court that the four tried to see who could go the longest without "pleasuring themselves", I believe is what she says. But, when this episode aired on NBC, I could have sworn hearing Marla directly saying "The four tried to see who could go the longest without HAVING SEX". I don't know if they reshot the whole thing, or if this is just false memory.
      Also, in the first part of the finale, Ellaine ALMOST tells Jerry she loves him. The payoff of this scene is always edited when this episode is run in syndication.

    • While the jury is reaching a verdict, the characters (who have appeared in two or more shows, including the Seinfelds, the Costanzas, "J" Peterman, Mickey, the little fellow, and the Rabbi who lived in Elaine's building), where entertaining themselves. One clip shows Puddy wearing a brown suit, sitting against a tree getting a tan. But, later that same day/episode when the jury reach their decision, and the group are found guilty, Elaine tells Puddy not to wait for her, and he's wearing a grey suit, while every other character is wearing their original costume.

  • QUOTES (13)

    • Marla: Well... I heard of a... of a... oh I can't!
      Prosecutor: It's alright, just... slowly...
      Marla: I was... made aware of a-a contest, between the four of them. In which they... to see who could go the longest without--oh I can't do it! It's too embarrassing!
      Prosecutor: Its okay, it'll be okay just tell us what happened.
      Marla: To see who could go the longest without... gratifying themselves!
      (The court reels back in disgust)

    • George: It was Moops!
      Bubbleboy: MOORS!

    • (Epilogue, on stage in the prison)
      Jerry: So what is the deal with the yard? I mean when I was a kid my mother wanted me to play in the yard. But of course she didn't have to worry about my next door neighbor Tommy sticking a shiv in my thigh. And what's with the lockdown? Why do we have to be locked in our cells? Are we that bad that we have to be sent to prison, in prison? You would think the weightlifting and the sodomy is enough. So, anyone from Cellblock D?
      Prisoner 1: I am.
      Jerry: I'll talk slower. I'm kidding - I love Cellblock D. My friend George is in Cellblock D. What are you in for,sir?
      Prisoner 2: Murder one.
      Jerry: Murder one? Oooooo, watch out everybody. Better be nice to you. I'm only kidding sir - lighten up. How about you, what are you in for?
      Prisoner 3: Grand theft auto.
      Jerry: Grand theft auto - don't steal any of my jokes.
      Prisoner 3: You suck - I'm gonna cut you.
      Jerry: Hey, I don't come down to where you work, and knock the license plate out of your hand.
      Guard: Alright, Seinfeld, that's it. Let's go. Come on.
      Jerry: Alright, hey, you've been great! See you in the cafeteria

    • (Walking to their cell)
      Jerry: Well, it's only a year. That's not so bad. We'll be out in a year, and then we'll be back.
      Kramer: Could be fun. Don't have to worry about your meals, or what you're going to do Saturday night. And they do shows. Yeah, we could put on a show - maybe "Bye Bye Birdie" or "My Fair Lady". Elaine, you could be Liza Doolittle.
      Elaine: Why don't you just blow it out your...

    • Prosecutor: State your name.
      Soup Nazi: Yev Kasem.
      Prosecutor: Could you spell that please?
      Soup Nazi: No! Next question.

    • Jackie Chiles: Didn't I tell you I wanted you to wear the cardigan?
      George: It makes me look older.
      Jackie Chiles: Look older? Do you think this is a game? Is that what you think this is? I'm trying to give you a moral compass. You have no moral compass. You're going to walk into that courtroom, and the jury's going to see a mean, nasty, evil George Costanza. I want them to see Perry Como. No one's going to convict Perry Como. Perry Como helps out a fat tub who's getting robbed.

    • Prosecutor: How long was his book overdue?
      Mr. Bookman: 25 years. We don't call them delinquent after that long.
      Prosecutor: What do you call them?
      Mr. Bookman: Criminals.

    • Jackie: (speaking to Jerry) Oh. By the way. They're real, and they're spectacular!

    • Steinbrenner: He had one little problem though (speaking about George). He was a communist! Pink as they come! Like a big juicy steak!
      Frank Costanza: HOW COULD YOU GIVE 12 MILLION DOLLARS TO HIDEKI IRABU?!!!!

    • Jerry: See now to me that button is in the worst possible spot.
      George: Really?
      Jerry: Oh yeah. The second button is the key button. It literally makes or breaks the shirt. Look at it, it's too high. Its no mans no land.
      George: Haven't we had this conversation before?
      Jerry: You think?
      George: I think we have.
      Jerry: Yeah, maybe we have.
      (This is the same conversation the series opened up with between Jerry and George in "The Seinfeld Chronicles".

    • Jackie: Soup Nazi? You people have pet names for everybody!

    • (Estelle has fainted after the verdict)
      Frank: C'MON! WE GOTTA BEAT THE TRAFFIC!

    • Baliff: Court calls Yev Asem to the stand.
      Elaine: Soup Nazi!

  • NOTES (18)

    • This two-part episode was nominated for the 1998 Emmy Award for Outstanding Multi-Camera Picture Editing for a Series.

    • This is the second and last episode where the guest stars (except for the ones with the "With" credit) were credited in alphabetical order.

    • Wayne Knight (Newman), Jerry Stiller and Estelle Harris (Frank & Estelle Costanze), and, Barney Martin and Liz Sheridan (Morty & Helen Seinfeld), receive the "With" credit.

    • The voice of the last heckler to call out at Jerry's jail performance was provided by Larry David.

    • Throughout the series, Larry David has played more parts than any other actor or actress.

    • The Judge explains his sentence is due to the unusual indifference and apathy that the group has. There have been many instances throughout this show where the four of them are uncaring towards others and display selfishness however; earlier this season the episode "The Serenity Now" really highlights this. In that episode Jerry experiments with emotion but ends up in over his head and is confused when he cries. It was actually good foreshadowing for this episode.

    • Whenever a date of an incident is announced in court - 1/4/96 for the marble rye theft, 5/16/96 for the doctor's testimony about the envelopes, 11/18/92 for the Virgin's retelling of the contest, etc - the dates are the airdates of the original episodes.

    • Jackie Chiles flies down to defend Jerry, George, Elaine, and Kramer in this trial based on a short phone call even though, in previous episodes, he's expressed extreme reluctance to represent Kramer due to his tendency to screw up Jackie's work.

    • Just an interesting, though sad, note; Frank Sinatra died only hours after this episode aired.

    • The scene with Jerry in the cafeteria was in fact the last scene to be shot for the show.

    • Two different verdicts were shot, so no one knew the real ending of the story.

    • Jon Hayman, AKA the "Bubble Boy" plays the prison guard who escorts Jerry off the stage and off NBC's schedule for good.

    • This episode drew 76 million viewers.

    • Jerry Seinfeld is the only cast member to have appeared in every single episode.

    • A viewer notes that when Kramer starts talking about performing shows at the Prison, he brings up "My Fair Lady" and Elaine playing the lead role. She then goes to tell him to "Blow it out your..." The viewer believes this is a reference to many years before Julia was on Seinfeld. Sometime between being on "SNL" and "The Art of Being Nick," Julia appeared in a Broadway production of "My Fair Lady," and received a less than favorable reviews by several New York newspapers. Whether it's intentional or not, the viewer is willing to make an assumption that the reference to "My Fair Lady" was a quick stab back at the critics who at one point said she sucked.

    • Even though this episode was the series finale, the ending was left open with the characters repeating things like "It's just one year…," and "then we'll be back." Those along with the fact that none of the main cast had much success after "Seinfeld" left open the tantalizing possibility of the show returning. If the show had actually come back it would have been a television first, instead that honor went to Family Guy.

    • from IMDB:

      Jerry Seinfeld turned down an offer from NBC that would have made him $110 million for a tenth season of the show.

    • The jury was made up of friends and family of the cast and crew. The front row was made up of Dana Alexander (Jason's wife), Darin Henry (Larry David's assistant), the mother of an unknown crewmember, Carol Brown (the mother of Jerry's assistant), Spike Feresten (writer), and actress Myra Turley as the Forewoman. The back row was made up of the parents of the show's production accountant, some production guy, Steve Koren (writer), the show's set designer and Michael Richards' girlfriend. The courtroom scenes took three days to film, with two verdicts being shot. Hilarious interactions between Mickey and Bania, Newman and Keith Hernandez, J. Peterman and Puddy were recorded, however, they all fell victim to time constraints.

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • :
      The trial pays homage to the 1960 film "Inherit the Wind." Particularly, the scene where the attorney discusses how many important people will descend upon their little town, because the case is so high profile.

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