Sense and Sensibility

Season 1 Episode 2

Part 2

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Aired Unknown Jan 06, 2008 on BBC
9.6
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Part 2
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Marianne and Willoughby find themselves falling in love while Colonel Brandon is called away on urgent business. Elinor is relieved when Edward comes to visit, but his strange behaviour leaves her confused. When Willoughby announces that he has to leave, Marianne waits for the day that she can go and visit him, but her world soon comes crashing down around her.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    Janet McTeer

    Janet McTeer

    Mrs Dashwood

    Recurring Role

    Claire Skinner

    Claire Skinner

    Fanny Dashwood

    Recurring Role

    Anna Madeley

    Anna Madeley

    Lucy Steele

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (13)

      • Elinor: (About Marianne and Willoughby) I do expect, and hope, to hear of their engagement very soon.
        Brandon: That being the case, to your sister I wish all imaginable happiness, and to Willoughby, that he may endeavour to deserve her.

      • Colonel Brandon: What are you intentions towards Miss Marianne Dashwood?
        Willoughby: I beg your pardon.
        Colonel Brandon: I believe you heard me.

      • Marianne: I only wish you could be as happy as I am.
        Elinor: I am perfectly content.
        Marianne: You are not, you know you're not. Why doesn't Edward come?
        Elinor: I suppose because he has other obligations. Or perhaps he simply prefers to be elsewhere.
        Marianne: How can you be so calm about it Elinor?
        Elinor: Would it serve any good for me to be agitated? Should I lie sobbing and calling his name? I think it's best not to hope fervently for something that may never happen.
        Marianne: Then let me hope for you.

      • Elinor: Colonel Brandon was disappointed not to see you.
        Marianne: He did see me.
        Elinor: For about five seconds. He has a great regard for you Marianne.
        Marianne: And I for him, but he has one great defect: he's not Willoughby.

      • Mrs Dashwood: (After Willoughby has told Marianne he is leaving) If I were still mistress of Norland, my girls would never be treated like this!

      • Marianne: So how are you going to distinguish yourself?
        Edward: I shan't attempt it at all. I have no wish to be distinguished.

      • Willoughby: Let me ask you this, what are your intentions with regard to Marianne?
        Brandon: Whatever they are, they are entirely honourable, can you say the same thing?
        Willoughby: I cannot be blamed if Marianne prefers my company to yours. We are closer in age, in temperament, in taste, in short, in everything. I commiserate with you, but there it is.

      • Marianne: Ugh, there's nothing to wear! Why are we so poor?

      • Marianne: Elinor, you have no soul.
        Elinor: Perhaps not, but I flatter myself I do have a little sense.

      • Marianne: I sometimes wonder what it can be like to be you.
        Elinor: Very dull, no doubt.

      • Marianne: In any case, what have wealth or grandeur to do with happiness?
        Elinor: Wealth has a good deal to with it I think.
        Marianne: Elinor, for shame, are we not happy? Have we not been happy here? And we as poor as the gypsies.
        Elinor: Yes, and I think we might have been even happier if we had a little more money.

      • Edward: So, how does Devonshire suit? Plenty of pleasant walks I should think. And do you have good company, are the Middleton's pleasant people?
        Marianne: No, not at all, we couldn't be more unfortunately situated.
        Elinor: Marianne, how can you say that?

      • Marianne: I'm so happy, Elinor.
        Elinor: Yes, I think everybody is aware of that.
        Marianne: I believe you disapprove of me. But how would you have me behave? Oh, I have been open and sincere where I ought to have been reserved. I suppose I should have sat quietly and talked of nothing but the weather and roads?

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