Sharpe

Season 2 Episode 2

Sharpe's Enemy

0
Aired Wednesday 8:00 PM Jun 01, 1994 on ITV
8.9
out of 10
User Rating
25 votes
0

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Sharpe's Enemy
AIRED:

Portugal, 1813 The Spanish town of Adrados has been captured by a horde of French, Spanish and British deserters, who have taken two English women hostage, Sarah Dubreton and Isabella Farthingdale. Captain Sharpe is ordered to deliver the women's ransom, much to the disgust of Sir Augustus Farthingdale. Sharpe and Harper enter the convent where the women are held and are confronted by two French officers. Sharpe learns that one of the officers is the husband of Sarah Dubreton and they are on the same mission. To Sharpe's dismay, he learns that Hakeswill is a leader of the renegades and has increased the ransom price, giving Sharpe five days to come up with the extra money, or the women will be raped. Nairn discovers that the French intend to invade Portugal from Adrados and decides to thwart the plan. Sharpe is promoted to major and given command of the 60th Rifles in order to secure the safety of the women and prevent the French from taking the town.

moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Sunday
No results found.
Monday
No results found.
Tuesday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
    Michael Byrne

    Michael Byrne

    Nairn

    Guest Star

    Jeremy Child

    Jeremy Child

    Sir Augustus

    Guest Star

    François Guétary

    François Guétary

    Dubreton

    Guest Star

    Hugh Fraser (II)

    Hugh Fraser (II)

    Wellington

    Recurring Role

    Daragh O'Malley

    Daragh O'Malley

    Harper

    Recurring Role

    Michael Mears

    Michael Mears

    Cooper

    Recurring Role

    Watch Online

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (1)

    • QUOTES (8)

      • Teresa: Harper, I have half a bottle of the best Irish whisky from the Irish priests at Salamanca.
        Sharpe: You speak a word and you're dead, Harper.
        Harper: I'll be dead, but, sir, I'll be drunk.

      • Sharpe: What are you smiling at, Fredrickson?
        Frederickson: I'm not smiling, sir. A musket ball broke my jaw. I have false teeth. The sawbone stuck on the smile for free, sir. He also stuck on my hair. Hair belongs to a horse, sir.

      • Nairn: You see that colonel, Sharpe? That colonel came here to make you a major. Would you believe that?
        Sharpe: No, sir.
        Nairn: Right hand up to God, Sharpe.
        Sharpe: That's your left hand, sir.

      • Isabella: Voltaire says 'I have no morals, yet I am a very moral person'. And that's how I think I am.
        Sharpe: That's how I think you are, too.

      • Sarah: Don't worry. I'm married to a French colonel. We fell in love before this war began. He's a brave man and he'll come for me soon, I know he will.
        Isabella: I'm married to an English colonel. He's a coward, and he won't come at all.

      • Colonel Ducos: Come, Colonel. We've wasted enough time in Adrados. It was a fool's errand in the first place.
        Sharpe: Fool's errand? That man's wife is held hostage, sir! What is he to do?
        Colonel Ducos: Find another.

      • Sir Augustus Farthingdale: Disciplined troops desert, sir? Nonsense!
        Wellington: Don't be a damn fool, sir! Disciple is only a raabble-rouser's shout from anarchy, sir! Mark me close, Colonel. What do you think the supreme virtue? To the Frenchman in this recent revolution, it is liberty. To the wig, puffing in Parliament, it is licence to do anything provided do not disturb his pleasure. But to the common soldier it is anarchy. To do whatever he pleases and be damned to his fellow! But to me and Bonaparte, the supreme virtue is order. We are not wigs. We know that a man may love his neighbor of a Monday, and massacre him of a Tuesday unless society keeps him in order! These deserters, if not secured and shot, will destroy my army more surely than Bonaparte! And I'll thank you not to forget it.

      • (to Sir Augustus)
        Teresa: If you were a man, I would call you out, force you to fight a duel, and kill you.

    • NOTES (3)

    • ALLUSIONS (0)

    More
    Less