A Sleepy Hollow Community
FOX (ended 2017)
Welllllll okay then. I'm not quite sure that I particularly enjoyed the direction that the second episode of Sleepy Hollow seemed to indicate that the show would be following, but I'll get to that later. For now, let's get to the story:



This week's episode opened with an obvious dream sequence with Ichabod running through a forest trying to escape the four horseman (if you had less than 60 minutes into the show as the point at which another or even all 4 horseman would appear, congratulations you won your Sleepy Hollow pool). Clearly, Sleepy Hollow wanted OUaT to know that they can do horses too. Anyway, Ichabod ran into a bunch of brambles that began wrapping him up and swallowed him into a hole in the ground......


Ichabod was sucked into a tunnel, where a mysterious figure appeared:


If only it were true (someone call Lana Parrilla's agent). But no, it was Ichabod's wife Katrina and she had some knowledge bombs to drop on Ichabod about a bunch of things we learned in the pilot (*yawn*). Then we got to the important part, there was going to be an evil army coming and the first evil spirit was coming - naturally Katrina was as vague as humanly possible about what the hell she was talking about (primarily the who/what/where/why, but very clear that she meant a witch) leaving Ichabod thoroughly confused.



The this creepy as hell thing happened:


And Ichabod awoke with a start to the real nightmare:


And here is where I must apologize for my lack of attention to detail in last week's photo recap and my previous trailer recap where I referred to the police force as the SHPD, because check out those collar pins.


Ichabod was in a rush to fill Abbie in on his dream, but wasn't allowed to leave the building. Back in the police station Abbie was going on another rant about the headless man and John Cho's death and how the other officers saw the same thing. However, the other officers had recanted their story leaving Abbie, once again, as the only person crying wolf as it were. Also, John Cho's death apparently didn't look quite the same on tape (looked like a suicide where he ran into the mirror).



Orlando Jones and Abbie then had an intense follow up discussion:





So after calling Abbie and Ichabod out for being crazy and talking about nonsense magical things, Orlando Jones kept them on the case and again said that they were his only lead (or something along that vein). However, they should NOT embarrass him. Also, he was bouncing out of town for a bit, so I don't think he really cared that much.
Hey Orlando do you want two people you think are batshit crazy in charge of the highest profile case in your department?


During this discussion with Abbie, we were also treated to an Ichabod meeting the modern world montage.



Finally Abbie came by the hotel to pick up Ichabod, where she started an annoying trend for the entire episode where she once again acted like she didn't believe anything (I was so happy to be done with that part in the pilot). But at least she brought Ichabod a treat (loved this part <3 donut holes).


Then Ichabod filled Abbie in on his dream/vision and warned her that an evil spirit was coming. Abbie flipped out at Ichabod again.



At which point we cut to a morgue, where something was waking up in a body bag. Was it the evil spirit? Hell no, it was:

John Cho was back! And this scene was awesome! The demon thing reanimated John Cho and gave him a mission to go wake up the evil spirit with this talisman.


Meanwhile Ichabod and Abbie were shooting the breeze in the cop car, when we all found out that Abbie is a secret shipper as she tried to get Ichabod to talk about Katrina. However, I was considerably more invested in the issue of taxation of donuts.


While in the graveyard for the funeral of Abbie's mentor/sheriff Ichabod returned to his wife's fake grave (I see you there Duft) and figured out that the evil spirit was a witch. Later that night John Cho used the amulet to summon the witch's spirit. He told her that she had to kill some people to get her flesh back and some other random tidbits - typical witch reanimation stuff basically.


However, the creepy zombie copy John Cho was highly entertaining. He stopped a guy on the road and had one of the weirdest conversations ever with the primary purpose of hearing the man's name. This was in order to confirm for the witch that this was the right target.


While the witch went on a killing spree, Ichabod deduced that part of the reason Abbie was so upset about everything was because of Corbin's death. We then learned that indeed as we thought last week he was more like a father/mentor than simple partner. Abbie had turned to drugs after the incident in the woods and had even robbed a pharmacy. Corbin had been the one to find her and gave her a choice: get her crap together or go to jail.


The next day Abbie and Ichabod went to check out the dead guy in the burned out car, when Ichabod had a funny feeling of deja vu. I know Abbie's first question was:

Apparently during Ichabod's travels during the war he had stumbled across a field of bodies that looked identical to this. He even sensed something evil and the witch was kind enough to step out into the open so Ichabod could see her:


So now we had a name that was witchy sounding, I'm going to just stick with witch. Anyway our heroic duo decided to return to the station to see if Corbin had any files on her. Unfortunately his files had been put into storage. However, we did get to meet Abbie's ex and learned that Ichabod too, is a secret shipper.



But Abbie had some explaining to do:


It turned out that the files were in the building across the street. Fortunately, Ichabod knew of a secret entrance from the police station.


Ichabod and his cohorts used to use a set of underground tunnels to transport ammo and supplies in secret. Oh and also there was this:


Oh and there was also a surprising amount of unexploded unstable ordinance underneath the police station, which is like Homeland Security's worst nightmare:


Anyway they made it across the street into the archives that seemed to be getting set up as a sort of base for them or something?


They easily found Corbin's files and we learned another interesting tidbit about Ichabod - he has an eidetic memory. He remembers everything - but for some reason all he remembers from the last 250 years is this:

It turns out that the witch was burned to death, but leveled a curse that would allow her to come back to life if she had the ashes from the descendants of the man who killed her. Also just to let whoever leaked the premise of American Horror Story: Coven inside Fox know:

But the actual capture of the witch was pretty awesome:


Anyway Abbie and Ichabod figured out the likely next target of the witch, however there was a nice twist as it turned out not to be the little boy we had been let to believe was the next descendant, but actually his father's ashes.

John Cho continued to be hilariously awesome in this episode as the zombie henchman as he dug up the witches bones while she just watched:


The witch was successful in returning to life in a very well done CGI sequence. Once again guns failed to work in killing the witch, and even the characters mentioned that this seemed to be a continuing theme which I thoroughly appreciated. Instead, they blew up the witch - directly underneath the police station.


Back in the police station Abbie had a dream/vision of her own of Corbin and it turns out that he might not be completely gone:


He told her that she should stop being afraid because she had important things to do. Abbie just missed him. However, he then dropped what I thought was going to be a great piece of speculative drama to come (Number mysteries always work to drive conspiracy theorists crazy with television shows).


Unfortunately this then happened:


The mysterious occupant of Room 49 in the mental hospital turned out to be Abbie's sister Jenny.


It turns out that Jenny might be a bit of a badass, which isn't that surprising considering:


However, the demon thing briefly appeared leading us to believe that he is watching her.
Here's the rough news guys - I was pretty not psyched about this episode. It's looking like this might be a "evil spirit" per week procedural show instead of a balls to the walls all out crazy serialized drama that I think we were all hoping for. This is especially obvious by the absence of the horseman who I imagine will only be dropping by at the midseason and season finales. Serialized procedurals can work (like in Fringe), but the case of the week's need to resonate with us the viewer and expand the universe the show is operating in. This week's case focused on a random witch - who had no backstory for why she was in the evil coven, what were her motivations, etc. etc. It simply was Step 1) Insert evil witch for episode, 2) Evil witch is mad she is dead and wants revenge, no need for further story or character development, 3) Kill evil witch. If it turns out that this is going to rinse, repeat like this I might be out. However, I like tv.com's four episode test for this show, because there were some truly awesome scenes - John Cho's death, John Cho's reanimation, everything John Cho, Tom Mison and the donut holes, and both the witches capture and reanimation sequences. So some hope still remains. I am extremely interested to see how the viewer numbers change from this episode to episode 3 because I can see a big drop coming after this one.

What did you think of Episode 2?
John Cho is killing so far right?
Did we need a love interest for Abbie so quickly?
Would you keep watching this show if it turned into an evil spirit case of the week procedural?
What should the nickname for the archive base be?
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Oct 14, 2013
I'm a bit late to this comment section, but after reading the review, I can't help add my own suggestions.

Any good villian is as much about not being there as being there. Unless the show is "Lunch with Satan" you don't want the main character/s meeting their major enemy every show. The more they show up, the more the main character/s have to deal with the improbability of defeating them (if you defeat them, show ends. If you don't defeat them, how do they survive over and over and over again, without debasing either the villian or the main characters structure.) Therefore, having to deal with a disparate group of minions is the only viable option. Also, most bad guys aren't going to want to go mano-a-mano anyway. They want to be in control, defeat you via proxy, show you how contemptible you are that they don't even have to be present to defeat you. The main character/s have to EARN the right to get to challenge the big boss, if you want to make the fight memorable.

Supernatural shows have a more fluid structure but that doesn't mean audiences don't understand that they have some sort of rules/boundaries that they shouldn't cross. Otherwise, the show is a) horsemen shows up b) horsemen kills everyone c) apocalypse begins, world ends d) the end. That also applies to their minions. If not, the show would be a) Moloch makes Super Minion b) Super Minion kills everyone c) and d) same as above. That means that even stronger than normal characters still have to exist, plausibly, within some sort of boundary that allows them to function without jumping the shark of the story. And that is a fine line to walk if you are playing the main heroes as human beings. A show like Smallville could get away with more over-the-top villians being less constrained because Superman was over-the-top to begin with. Maybe Ichabod is really Super-abod now, because of his blood transfusion with the horseman and a spell boost by his late wife, but I doubt the show would survive him shouting Fas Ro Dah at a demon and making it disappear. In fact, his humanity (and human solutions) is precisely what dovetails strongly with Abbie's own fraility and makes their struggle to overcome these supernatural creatures without supernatural means all the more compelling. Macguyver (for those people who remember the show) would have been a completely different show if he had simply picked up a gun and shot all the bad guys with it.

As for the nature of the villians/allies in this program, this show isn't meant to be shown back to back with a History channel presentation of the various creatures/cultures/mythologies shown in the episode. In other words, expect to see alot of 'familiar' creatures from folklore acting in both traditional and non-traditional ways. Does an evil witch, who was burned alive, really need her bones in order to reach her full power: I'd say glowing dead creature who can set others on fire is pretty powerful as it is. Again, its about bringing these creatures into a world in which they don't automatically render all characters, and their actions against them, as being futile (except for moments of comedy or drama, ie "Do you think he can hear us [without having a head]?")

In addition, shows like this are good because they essentially are creating their own mythology, using only the bare structure of established mythologies, in order to fashion the rules of their world. It would be like complaining there was no 37th regiment in the Colonial army commanded by Colonel John Shaw (or whatever his name was.) The witches, demons, ghosts, creatures, etc in this show adhere to the rules of the show, not to the accepted rules of whatever mythology gave birth to them. That means that things can happen to these traditional creatures that are unexpected (like needing the bones in order to incarnate and wreck true havok.)

As for erasing the mystery of #49 too easily...this show is dripping with mysteries. I think moments like that are as much for the audience as they are for the characters. You want a mix of the audience sharing the character's journey but also be slightly omniscient of it as well. Think of the scene in Episode 4 where the Piano Teacher walks into the bar after Jenny has been there. That scene would be completely different if the audience was in the bartender's shoes and didn't know anything about the strange people who entered it and what they wanted. The audience knowing more than the characters can whet their appetite for how that situation is going to resolve itself. The mystery/drama isn't always in the destination but the journey that gets you there.
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Sep 26, 2013

Oh yeah, and "The number 49..."
Wtf? Why suddenly so vague? You were talking like a normal person 5 seconds ago but god forbid you let some useful information slip out.
(A lot like Katrina, no?)
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Sep 26, 2013
What do you mean about the scene where they caught the witch?
That made NO SENSE.

If she had the abaility to fly, why dind't she do it BEFORE the net came down?!?
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Sep 26, 2013
Ability. Apparently I can't spell. Neither can you Spellcheck
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svr
Sep 25, 2013
How do you guys feel about the character of Katrina? She's a stunning actress, but I felt the character was a tad annoying in both episodes. "Ichabod, hurry! You have exactly 1 episode to decipher my unclear instructions in order to please our viewers at home!"

To me, she feels like a cross between Basil Exposition from Austin Powers and the assignment-voice from Mission Impossible.

Ok enough negativity. I like the rest of the show. I still want to see Orlando Jones drink a 7Up. Or use it to cast a spell...
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Sep 27, 2013
Yeah, I've not been impressed with either the character or the actress. She might have exceptional talent, but I haven't seen it here, and I REALLY don't yet buy her as Ichabod's lover. Her vague instructions from her other dimension (along with Clancy Brown's Sheriff Corbin) are in part the consequence of oracle-style premonitions, which give information that's typically only helpful in retrospect.

In contrast, Corbin's easy chemistry with Abbie, though I don't think it's had much more screen time than Ichabod and Katrina, is considerably more impressive. It's an entire relationship structured around pie and homicidal, apocalyptic witches, and Clancy Brown and Nicole Beharie sell it.
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Sep 25, 2013
I don't feel strongly about Katrina one way or the other, so far she's to Ichabod what Clancy Brown's character is to Abbie.

The seemingly different guiding style makes sense considering one is the wife and the other a father figure.
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Sep 25, 2013
See, I'm perfectly okay with case-of-the-week type stuff. Serialized dramas are good too, but I don't understand why every show - even every genre show - has to be serialized. Honestly, I'm a little tired of people complaining about genre shows that aren't serialized enough for them. Fringe, Supernatural, and Grimm are three awesome shows that were/are pretty episodic. Also, those shows did get more serialized as they went on - it's entirely likely Sleepy Hollow will too. I mean, it's only the second episode.

Anyhow, so yes, I definitely will still keep watching. This is what I was expecting, actually. I really liked the episode.

I really don't know how John Cho got so creepy. It was awesome and terrifying at the same time.
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Sep 24, 2013
How about letting the show develop a little before basing its format? As I recall Fringe needed a whole season before it got interesting. This show has a lot of potential, whether serialized or episodic it's up to the writers to make it good. And don't take the show too seriously, it's fantasy and that's the part we should enjoy. Let's just hope they kill it with stupidity like some other current shows we know.
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Sep 24, 2013
The first episode was good. This was bad. It looked cheaper, the director made some weird choices, and the story was boring. I didn't like the zombie cop. I didn't like that the stereotype boss looked at the tape and didn't see anything odd. (You can't stretch out your neck to three times its normal length by running into a mirror). Why did the demon kill him in the first place? Was that just a way to bust him out of jail? I would have preferred just about any other way.

I was OK with John Cho and Clancy Brown getting killed in the pilot. I would have been OK with them being left alive. But I don't like this "compromise", where they're both "dead" and still on the show as a zombie and a hallucination. I don't mind an occasional short flashback, but I don't like dreams and hallucinations. I also don't like cryptic comments when there's no obvious reason to not speak in plain English. I'm starting to think I won't like this show.

I would want them to spend more time on Ichabod's adjustment, but I'm sure people who had no problem's with today's episode would call it "filler". We can't have people behaving the way normal people would, can we?


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Sep 24, 2013
the boss is with the bad guys, I think - I believe it showed in episode 1, or I might have dreamed about it :)

I would also go for more Ichabod's adjustment, that part is funny! I think I will loose interest if the "funny" part gets reduced.
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Sep 24, 2013
I believe this is the first time I've ever seen two main characters killed off in the first episode only to come back in the second.
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Sep 24, 2013
To be completely fair, at no point the pilot suggested John Cho or Clancy Brown were the main characters.

We only assumed that they were because, after Hikaru Sulu (Into the Darkness) and Kelvin Inman (Lost), they were the biggest names in the credits .
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Sep 24, 2013
I gues The Walking Dead doesn't count, since they are not really "characters"
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Sep 24, 2013
Ichabod's Headless Headquarters?
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Sep 24, 2013
The Grimm and Supernatural comparisons are certainly accurate (and I personally love Grimm) for this episode. My concern for this show then is it's placement on Fox's schedule, even Grimm can't get free of the Friday slot (and its not like NBC has a lot of other popular shows at the moment) - so it's hard to see Sleepy Hollow (the procedural version) lasting in the Monday night slot.
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Sep 24, 2013
To be honest, I see it more like a time travelling version of Fringe or an historical fiction version of Desmond's story from Lost.

At the end of the day, this is about two characters Ichabod and Abbie - Walter and Astrid (Fringe), Desmond and Charlie or Faraday and Desmond (Lost) - that anchor each other amidst a maddening reality.
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Sep 24, 2013
I think the comparisons are particularly apt. I too follow Grimm and Supernatural. I'm a HUGE fan of the 5-season Kripke period, in particular. But, both shows have had some seriously underwhelming freak-of-the-week procedural episodes, including the follow-up to the pilot for both shows. Including Fringe—which ultimately turned into a highly serial, hardly procedural show—I think this type of show uses several mostly mediocre (but still fun) to establish a rhythm and an audience before it plunges into its mythology-heavy meat. Grimm and Fringe each took a whole season, basically.

As for its survival odds, I have to say (whether deserved or not) Fox has a wider general audience than NBC, regularly draws more viewers of its pilots, though NBC's had some recent success. Grimm actually succeeded DESPITE being all but written off by NBC. It received minimal publicity, was shuttled around in the schedule with particularly erratic airings of new episodes, and was generally dismissed by entertainment critics and journalists as a weaker alternative to ABC's fairytaledrama Once Upon a Time. Fox has generally been more savvy about arranging and promoting new shows.

(A point of interest: According to the overnights, Sleepy Hollow only lost about 11% of its viewership from last week, not accounting for the +7 DVRs. Considering the massive amounts of additional competition this week with all of last night's series premieres, I'd consider this a very good sign. We'll see if it continues to hold up.)
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Sep 24, 2013
Not sure if this will help, but i don't follow Supernatural or Grimm (I watched some episodes of Grimm but didn't like it at all). And I'm enjoying this show so far. I watched the first season of OUAT and I liked it. This is comparable, i guess. I have followed Haven every season - there are supernatural aspects and it is procedural at the same time. I have always found the cases of the week really silly, but it's fun at the same time to see what they come up with, and there's the small town factor and some little humour. I think I can find the same in Sleepy Hollow. Although the witch story wasn't all that interesting, they managed to insert some more info on the overall story and also some very funny points :)
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Sep 24, 2013
I'm more concerned by FOX's recent tradition of sending anything sci-fi/fantasy straight to Friday nights - Fringe and Dollhouse come to mind. This season could be especially difficult because of the presence of Almost Human - if both shows start to struggle, will one get cancelled and one get sent to Friday purgatory? Sleepy Hollow won the demographic and overall viewers in it's timeslot against the CBS comedies, but I'm still curious how the viewership will change next week now that the more procedural element has been established.
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Sep 24, 2013
I'd say its the dynamic between Abbie and Crane what grounds it to me, he clings to her as castaway would to a lifeline and she responds to it in kind.

For some reason, it's easier to accept the whole premise when the human connection feels so real.
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Sep 24, 2013
This show is awesome. I'm willing to overlook its obvious issues because it's just a really fun ride. Plus, I'm a huge fan of a lot of the crew - Len Wiseman, the Fringe folks, Damien Kindler...I'll be tuning in every week because it's entertaining and I enjoy watching shows, not nit-picking every little detail. Where's the fun in that?
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Sep 24, 2013
I blame some of the over simplification on the whole phenomenon that happens when you have a pilot that a network needed to be convinced to send a series to order and then the next episode is filmed awhile later with minor focus group corrections and then sometime necessary sometimes not retread of the original story from the pilot. I have hope going forward that the bigger mythology (I really had this thought last night, I know there are all these Fringe, OUAT type comparisons, but I swear Grimm is the appropriate show comparison and I bet the same complaint - the bigger mythology is so much more interesting than the week to week Wesen police cases but then you don't want to get rid of them because you will randomly have like the Fly episode and, well, Hank) because I have a feeling Jenny is more connected to the bigger story (thank you for the id, it was driving me nuts, the lack of an accent and full make up did it - is she not going to be in the last six episodes of Nikita then? it was sad enough when Sean died).

John Cho's character was awesome, I kind of hope he is more than just a zombie so we can get some background on him apparently being the only evil coven member in town (way to police the town dead priest guy) but I really liked the weirdly put upon and apologetic way he goes about doing his tasks. I am assuming he is mostly invisible just based on how quickly he disappeared behind Abby. I am going to make a mid season finale call, he sets his sights on Abby and Ichabod and the other characters have to actually work together without her being a go between.

I wonder how long before Katrina actually gets to interact with any of the other characters....
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Sep 24, 2013
Archive Base: "The Ich-abode"
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svr
Sep 25, 2013
HAHAHA!!!! I love it!
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