• 1
    Don't Forget Your Toothbrush

    Don't Forget Your Toothbrush

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    Comedy Central (ended 2001)
    Remember "Beat the Clock?" Remember "People Are Funny?" Well this show is a blend of the two types of game show. As host, Mark Curry knows everything about everyone in the audience, as well as who'll play for the prizes, the biggest being a one-week vacation to various points on the globe which starts the moment they win it (hence the title). Based on a British game show.moreless
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    House Calls

    House Calls

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    CBS (ended 1982)
    House Calls is a short-lived series that airs on CBS. The show took place around a surgeon and the administrative assistant's love life. By using comedy, the show is able to demonstrate just how crazy the hospital workers were. The series is from the 1979 movie House Calls. Ann Anderson (Lynn Redgrave) and Dr. Charley Michaels (Wayne Rogers) share a love for the first two seasons, until Dr Michaels moves on to Jane Jeffries (Sharon Gless), in the third season of the show. The show abruptly comes to an end, due to bad ratings and the short series. Despite the poor quality, Lynn Redgrave and Wayne Rodgers both receive Emmy nominations for their roles. Lynn Redgrave also receives a nomination for a Golden Globe. Sharon Gless leaving the show after the second season, is due to difficulties with the producers of the show, but she moves on to star in the hit show Cagney and Lacy. moreless
  • 3
    Who Wants to Be a Millionaire

    Who Wants to Be a Millionaire

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    From the four corners of the continent, people with dreams of instant riches are flown to New York City, to seize the day when they, with courage and wisdom, gain the opportunity to change the course of their lives in one short day. This is the world's greatest game show..... Who Wants to Be a Millionaire!!! Based upon the British program of the same title, this show offers a maximum prize of $1,000,000 for correctly answering a series of multiple choice questions. Originally, as in the UK edition, contestants were required to correctly answer 15 questions of increasing difficulty, but in 2010, the format was modified so that the contestants are now faced with 14 questions of random difficulty. This show has endured as one of the longest-running and most popular variants in the global Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? franchise. The original hour-long prime-time version of the show was broadcast on ABC from August 16, 1999 to June 27, 2002, and was hosted by Regis Philbin, a famed media personality, actor, and singer with a career going back to the 1960s, who is most widely known for hosting a "live" morning talk show. ABC's overexposure of the program led audiences to tire of it, and grilled the show to cancellation. However, not all hope was lost for the property: the production team reincarnated the show as a half-hour syndicated series, which premiered on September 16, 2002. The syndicated Millionaire's original host was Meredith Vieira, a news anchor and journalist who, at the time of the show's debut, was chiefly known as the moderator of ABC's daytime talk show The View, then later co-hosted NBC's Today Show from 2006 through 2011, and is now set to become the host of a syndicated talk show that will premiere in the coming year. Vieira remained Millionaire's host through eleven seasons, hosting over 1,800 episodes and giving away over $70,000,000 to a vast multitude of contestants, before deciding to abandon her then-current career and pursue new opportunities. Subsequently, Cedric Kyles, an actor, director and (as his stage name implies) an entertainer, signed on to become the show's new host, and his run is set to begin in September 2013. The game play of the Millionaire show has been changed substantially since the program's introduction to American airwaves. Originally contestants were required to call the phone number 800-433-8321 and play a telephone game wherein they had to answer three questions correctly, then get selected into a random drawing, then compete for ten spots on the show and subsequently play a preliminary "Fastest Finger" round before finally advancing to the Hot Seat to begin their journeys for $1,000,000. Now potential contestants take a written test, participate in an interview, and advance to the syndicated program, where they are simply called onstage after the preceding contestant's game ends. The show originally adhered to the same format as the British version, but in 2008 the formula began to deviate substantially from the original, with the addition of a clock that would time contestants' questions, and the use of experts who would contact the contestant for answers via a face-to-face Skype connection. The format was given its biggest overhaul yet in Fall 2010, with the introduction of question randomization and the retirement of all the lifelines (with the exception of "Ask the Audience") in favor of "jumps" that would allow contestants to skip the question and move on to the next level automatically. ABC has occasionally brought back the prime-time version for special editions. In 2004, the production team created Who Wants to Be a Super Millionaire, which was aired on a more limited basis, and which featured a top prize of $10,000,000, more money than anyone else has ever won in television history to date. Then 2009 saw a special 10th Anniversary Celebration which celebrated the milestone of the program's debut with a number of special celebrity guests, including a "Mystery Guest" revealed to be Vieira, who would turn the tables on Philbin himself - and invite the remaining "Fastest Finger" contestants to compete on the syndicated show. There were also a number of special events and gameplay twists on the mainstream program's run. A progressive jackpot was briefly used on the primetime show, increasing by $10,000 for each episode wherein the top prize was not won, and celebrity editions have also been conducted, with notable individuals from various fields playing for charitable organizations of their choice. The U.S. version of Millionaire has been credited with single-handedly reviving - and even breaking new ground for - the game show genre. It revolutionized the look and feel of game shows with its unique lighting system, dramatic music cues, and futuristic set, and became one of the highest-rated shows in the history of American television. It paved the way for the genre of reality programming, and made catchphrases out of such lines as "Is that your final answer?"moreless
  • 4
    Hot Potato

    Hot Potato

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    NBC (ended 1984)
    Meet these men; they're three of a kind. BARRY: "Hi, I'm Jack Barry." ENRIGHT: "I'm Dan Enright." CULLEN: "I'm Bill Cullen, and we're…" ALL: "Dead game show kingpins!" And they were the energies behind Hot Potato, the last-ever game show co-produced by Jack Barry. Quite often, Hot Potato is compared to Family Feud. While the two games have some similarities, Hot Potato had distinct differences that made this NBC program one of the more unique game shows of the early 1980s. Two teams of three members each competed. Early in the run, the civilian-only teams had something in common (e.g., beauty operators, police officers) hence, they were billed as "three of a kind." Host Bill Cullen announced a question, which could be based on general knowledge (e.g., Name the states that start with the letter "M"; list the presidents who were born in Ohio) or on polls ("We asked men if they were stranded on a desert island, which female celebrity would they most want with them?"; "What are the most popular hamburger toppings?"). Each question had no less than seven possible answers that the contestants had to guess. (One question had thirteen responses, but only seven were required to win a round.) A member of the champion team went first, electing to either give an answer or force a specific member of the opposing team to answer (see below) thus, passing the "Hot Potato." A correct answer by the team in control allowed the team to retain control and one of his/her team members took a turn. Players were eliminated in the following ways: * By giving an incorrect answer or one not on the survey (a light on Cullen's podium signified simply if that player was right or wrong). * Taking too much time. * Repeating an answer (or more often than not, two answers since Cullen usually gave players a second chance). That eliminated player was disqualified from the remainder of the round and retired to a bench behind the podium. The opposing team then took control. If a member of the team wished to challenge, he/she chose a specific member of the opposing team, who then had to give an answer. If a correct answer was given, the person making the challenge was benched and the other team took control; if a wrong answer was given, the challenged player was knocked out and the original team kept control. Also, after five correct responses were given, Cullen would review the answers to aid the contestants. A team won a round in one of two ways: * By giving the seventh correct answer. * After an opposing team had all three of its members eliminated through challenges or incorrect answers. Cullen then revealed any answers that were not yet given. At the beginning of Hot Potato's short run, a "Seven Straight Jackpot" was instituted, wherein a team that gave seven correct answers without a miss or challenge won a jackpot (which started at $500 and grew by $500 until claimed). The team that won the best-of-three front game was the champion, earned $1,000, and advanced to the end game. There, Cullen announced a category (e.g., length) and read a question that had two possible answers ("Which is longer, the longest earthworm or the longest Cadillac?"). Each correct answer added $500 to the pot, and a team could stop at any time and collect the money, or go on. An incorrect answer at any time stopped the end game and lost any accumulated winnings. Teams were allowed to pass on one question if they were stuck. Five correct answers won the end game's cash jackpot, which increased by $5,000 until claimed (though each new champion started with $5,000). About halfway through the run, the series was reformatted and given the title Celebrity Hot Potato. Teams were changed to having one contestant (one of them a returning champion) paired with two celebrities each. Also, the "Seven Straight Jackpot" - which, BTW, was won on the final civilian show - was scrapped. While Hot Potato was fun, a poor time slot and inevitable comparisons to Family Feud (both aired at 12:00 P.M. ET) led to poor ratings. Several NBC affiliates opted to air their local news at that time. Add to that the death of executive producer Jack Barry in May of 1984 and, well, the show was more doomed than the proverbial hot potato in a microwave oven. After broadcasting 115 shows, NBC canceled Hot Potato June 29, 1984, in the middle of a game that ended in a 1-1 tie (both contestants were awarded $500). Bill Cullen immediately became the new host of The Joker's Wild in the fall of 1984, supplanting Jack Barry. Not long after it was canceled by NBC, Hot Potato saw its first reruns in the fall of 1984, courtesy of CBN (later ABC Family). Only then did audiences get to see Celebrity Hot Potato in the correct order. The show subsequently reran on USA and on Game Show Network (now GSN), though it hasn't been aired in some time. TV.com wishes to extend a big thank-you to David Schwartz at GSN for providing much-needed broadcast information on the Celebrity Hot Potato episodes. The Hot Potato Episode List is correct and complete. Now it's up to you, the contributors, to confirm the questions that were asked in each show and contribute them.moreless
  • 5
    Amateur's Guide To Love

    Amateur's Guide To Love

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    CBS (ended 1972)
  • 6
    Password

    Password

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    CBS (ended 1975)
    Password was a simple word-association game, but became one of the most popular and beloved game shows of all time. It was the first successful show to pair a contestant with a celebrity partner and among the first to return after being cancelled several years. A retooled version of "Password" began in 1979 (as Password+Plus and later in 1984 as Super Password) enjoyed two more highly successful runs. This Password page, however, focuses on the 1961-1967 and 1971-1975 versions. Two contestants competed, each paired with a star partner that played the entire week. Host Allen Ludden gave one member of each team a "password," and using 1-word clues only (proper nouns were accepted), it was the cluegiver's job to get his or her partner to guess the word for 10 points. If the 1st team didn't guess the word, the opposing team (who was allowed to "eavesdrop") could try to successfully communicate the word with a new clue (or sometimes even the same clue) for 9 points. Play alternated until the word was guessed with 1 point deducted for each clue or until all 10 clues were given at Ludden's discretion (if it was obvious the word would never be guessed) or if the cluegiver accidentally uttered part or all of the password. Illegal clues – such as hyphenated words and clues with more than one word – and taking too much time also passed control to the opponents will be sounded by the buzzer from The Word Authority of Dr. Reason A. Goodwin--The Editor of World Book Encyclopedia Dictionary. Usually, the stars (who played the entire weekday) gave the clues on the 1st word of a game with the contestants trying to guess the word; then the contestants gave the clues and the celebrities tried to guess and so on. Play continued until 1 team scored 25 points (or on occassion, a time's up whistle sounded). The contestant won $100 on CBS Daytime and ($250 for the nighttime portion) and his or her team played the Lightning Round (believed to be the 1st endgame in a game show). In the Lightning Round, the celebrity partner was shown a series of 5 new passwords, one at a time. He or she had 60 seconds (1 Minute) to communicate all 5 to the contestant at $50 per correct guess of the word. An illegal clue or a pass meant no money could be earned on that word. Up to $250 was possible in the Lightning Round. Each contestant played 2 games after which they both retired; a contestant could win a maximum of $700. Even contestants who were shut out of any cash winnings were given a consolation gift (usually a camera or a set of World Book encyclopedias or other stuff). The most impressive contestants returned each year for a tournament of champions, but this was little more than asking them back to play two more games for $700 extra. The show debuted on the CBS daytime schedule on October 2, 1961 and continued through September 15, 1967; a nighttime Portion premiered on January 2, 1962 and had 2 runs up to May 22, 1967. Actress Betty White was a frequent guest star(and in June 1963, was a permanent fixture in Ludden's life ... as his wife); she appeared very frequently in all revivals of Password, long after Ludden's death on June 9, 1981; little wonder she was among the best players of this game. Reruns were syndicated to local stations after leaving CBS daytime (in part due to a naughty new game show called The Newlywed Game which was scheduled against Password) before reappearing on April 5, 1971 as a part of the ABC daytime schedule. Play was largely as before with modest cash payouts. That's until November 18, 1974, when the powers-that-be decided to change the game. An all-star edition – as Password All-Stars with 6 stars playing for charity – and a revised format with 4 contestants (2 of which were paired with a celebrity partner) competing for 2 spots in the main game were seen more as screwing up a good thing than changing it. Needless to say, the show would die of a quick death leaving ABC after an 5 season run on June 27, 1975. However, Goodson-Todman did make some changes that DID work, and showcased them in another revival called Password Plus, which debuted on January 8, 1979 on NBC (hosted originally by Ludden and later Bill Cullen and Tom Kennedy). That show remained until March 26, 1982, but it returned on September 24, 1984 as Super Password (hosted by Bert Convy) and it lived on NBC until March 24, 1989. See Password Plus and Super Password for more details. Broadcast History of Password: October 2, 1961-September 15, 1967 CBS-TV: Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:30pm April 5, 1971-September 3, 1971 ABC-TV: Monday-Friday at 4:00-4:30pm September 6, 1971-March 17, 1972 ABC-TV: Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00pm March 20, 1972-June 27, 1975 ABC-TV Monday-Friday at 12Noon-12:30pm.moreless
  • 7
    Movie Game

    Movie Game

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    (ended 1995)
    coming soon
  • 8
    Teen Win Lose or Draw

    Teen Win Lose or Draw

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    Disney Channel
    Welcome to the Teen Win Lose or Draw guide at TV.com.

    Marc Price (Skippy, Family Ties) hosted the junior version of this game.

    Two teams of each sex consisting of a celebrity & two contestants. Game play was same except it was for points, not money.

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  • 9
    Vs.

    Vs.

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    Comedy Central (ended 1999)
    coming soon...
  • 10
    Match Game '73

    Match Game '73

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    CBS (ended 1979)
    This is the classic edition of the ultimate classic game show that most people came to know and love. Originally intended to be simply an expanded CBS-TV remake of the popular 1962-1969 NBC-TV game show called The Star-Studded Big Money MATCH GAME 73 (and it's annual updates) soon it's grown into a bonafide, no-holds-barred comedy fest, full of innuendos, double-entendres, pouting celebrities and much more debuts including one as the show's return on June 25-29, 1973 on CBS-TV. Host Gene Rayburn played straight man to the antics of the 6-star panel but frequently aided the fun. The game itself as straightforward. 2 contestants and that includes a returning champion are both competed. The challenger chose 1 of the questions (marked "A" & "B") in 2 Rounds (marked "1" & "2") for which Rayburn read the question. While the questions were rather pedestrian early in the run (e.g., "Name a foreign car"), the questions quickly grew wild and wacky. Frequently, the questions involved a recurring list of characters such as Dumb Donald, Weird Willie and Old Man Periwinkle (the latter brilliantly portrayed by Rayburn); celebrities, politicians and news events of the time are also the butt of many of the questions. For example: "Wendy the waitress really likes it if you give her good tips. Give her a $10 bill, she'll put a sliced cherry in your drink. Don't tip her and she'll put in a _____." It's that really a blanked answer to the question and all the six(6) celebrities separately write their own answers on it's own light blue index cards. The Challenger and Later The Champion then asked for his/her answer. One by one, Rayburn – who frequently critiqued the contestant's answer (he or she might say "cherry bomb" or "cyanide," which would be the definitive answer, while "dirt" would be a rotten answer) – then the audience criticized each celebrity for his or her answer to match it. The Challenger and Later The Champion scored 1 Match. 2 Rounds are played with the challenger going 1st in the second round of questions (or the champion if the challenger matched all 6 stars); celebrities who matched a Challenger, The Champion or Both Matched Separately in the 1st round whom don't played for the 2nd & Last Round question for the Challenger and Later The Champion. The Person in the lead (Possible Total of 6 Matches) after 2 Rounds wins the game and collects $100 and played the Big Money SUPER MATCH. A Tie-Breaker Game is played if necessary (marked "TIE") with the same gameplay like as before. If the tie isn't broken after two(2) Tie-Breaker Games, then a sudden-death fill-in-the-blank tiebreaker is played. A fill-in-the-blank phrase (e.g., _____ Bunny) is shown; The Challenger & The Champion are write their response and the celebrities were called from Gene Rayburn for their answers. The 1st Person to match wins the game. In the highly unlikely event that both The Challenger & The Champion are provided to Match nor There's still No Match, then (after a typical Rayburn comment like, "Gee, we're really doing well, aren't we?") The sudden-death Tie-Breaker is played again until There's a MATCH. The sudden-death format is used right away for ties in the weekly syndicated MATCH GAME pm (because of time constraints) that started after the 1975-1976 season only regulars Richard Dawson, Brett Somers and Charles Nelson Reilly are played. The Super Match is played in 2 parts. In the 1st part (dubbed The Audience Match), Rayburn read a fill-in-the-blank phrase question in which had been given to a previous studio audience of 100 people (e.g., Cookie ______). The contestant asked 3 celebrities 1 At a time for suggested answers after which he or she could choose 1 of 3 Answers made by 3 Different Stars or Come up with 1 of his or her own. The 3 Top answers are all listed with the No. 3 choice worth $100, the 2nd-Most popular worth $250 and the Top choice worth $500. If the champion matched 1 of the top 3 answers, he/she wins the cash award and played The Head-to-Head Match for 10 times the cash award (equals ergo: $1000, $2500 or $5000). The Champion choose 1 celebrity, who's given an fill-in-the-blank phrase question as before. If there's an exact match from the star, the champion wins the Big Money. Even if the champion didn't match with the star, the champion kept his/her Audience Match winnings and faced a new challenger. Players returned until defeated or surpassing CBS-TV's $25,000 winnings limit (done just once in 1979 on 1 of these 10 unaired shows after "MATCH GAME 79" cancelled on CBS-TV). Richard Dawson is initially the only regular MATCH GAME 73-78 celebrity; Charles Nelson Reilly and Brett Somers became regulars in September 1973. Dawson is far and away the most popular Head-to-Head Match celebrity partner (one history of the show reported he's responsibile for greater than $1 Million in the champion's winnings). In 1976 as the show then called MATCH GAME 76 Dawson parlayed his success in the highly-successful ABC-TV run of "THE FAMILY FEUD." On June 28, 1978...The Star Wheel is added to the SUPER MATCH on MATCH GAME 78 which the champion spins to determine his or her celebrity partner. If the wheel stopped on certain areas of the wheel called the gold star area (designated "DOUBLE"), the champion played for 20 times their 1 of the 3 Cash awards (up to $10,000 on the CBS-TV show & The New MATCH GAME; $20,000 on MATCH GAME pm); otherwise, they played for their regular jackpot. Some fans of the show believe the addition of the Star Wheel that hastened Dawson's departure from the show on August 23, 1978 and though that's purely speculation. MATCH GAME 73 as fans came to know, had many classic moments during its 7 Season run on CBS-TV (too many to list here). The show also spawned a successful syndicated entry (the once-a-week MATCH GAME pm, which offered even higher cash prizes). After the CBS-TV show (and then called MATCH GAME 79) cancelled on April 20, 1979. 5 Months later it continued its life as the new 5-day/night-a-week entry as "The New MATCH GAME" Released on September 10-14, 1979 that series continued through September 10, 1982. A short-lived pairing with The Hollywood Squares in 1983-1984 on NBC-TV plus 2 self-contained revivals (ABC-TV in 1990-1991 and Syndicated TV in 1998-1999), soon followed. None managed to recapture the audience (nor particularly in the latter edition, the magic) of the one-of-a-kind original. Reruns of the classic MATCH GAME 73-79 have perpetually been among the highest-rated shows on Game Show Network (now GSN). THE BROADCAST HISTORY of MATCH GAME 73: June 25-December 31, 1973 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 74: January 2-December 31, 1974 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 75: January 2-August 15, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV August 18-November 28, 1975 at 3:00-3:30pm on CBS-TV December 1-31, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 76: January 2-December 31, 1976 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 77: January 3-November 4, 1977 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV November 7-December 16, 1977 at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV December 19, 1977-January 3, 1978 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 78 : January 4, 1978-January 2, 1979 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 79 : January 3-April 20, 1979 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV. Syndicated on every TV Market from September 10, 1979 to September 10, 1982 and Distributed By JIM VICTORY TELEVISION, INC. "MATCH GAME 73-79" is A MARK GOODSON-BILL TODMAN PRODUCTION in association with The CBS-TV Network.moreless
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    Family Feud

    Family Feud

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    ABC
    "It's time for The FAMILY FEUD" "On your Marks, Let's Start The FAMILY FEUD!" These Lines from Announcer Gene Wood and the star of The FAMILY FEUD is Richard Dawson from MATCH GAME 73 & Hogan's Heroes that debuts on ABC-TV on July 12-16, 1976 and 1 year Later the show enters Syndicated on September 19-25, 1977. The FAMILY FEUD features 2 Families across the USA by their last names and their nationally (1's a Winning Family) to compete for Fast Money for $5000 on ABC-TV & $10,000 on Syndicated. The Regular game has an "FAMILY FEUD Survey Board" contains from "3" to "12" and the survey answers were chosen by the audience at ABC Television Center in Hollywood, CA and across the USA and the world and the survey values from "2" to "90" represents number of people they talked about as dollars in the bank (cash). The Question to the survey answers are asked by Richard Dawson in a face-off of 2 Members of a Family. 1 Member will answer by determining to be the No. 1 Survey Answer. Otherwise another member of the challenging family will answer and take control of the Survey board. When an Answer didn't appear due to certain factors that cause a "STRIKE" and 3 Strikes You're OUT of the question and Let another family steal the money from the bank by answering 1 same question to the survey board. When it's successful they'll win cash from the bank. When it's a failure they'll take all the cash from the bank they created. A Clean Sweep that gives the family the entire bank to themselves. There's the regular Survey Dollar Value and the "Double" Survey Dollar Value and in 1979 The "Triple" Survey Dollar Value is introduced. The 1st Family raise $200 from 1976 to 1979, $300 from 1979 to 1984 and $400 from 1984 to 1985 wins to play FAST MONEY. In "FAST MONEY" 2 members of the family will play in 2 parts. In Part 1 The Family Member has 15 seconds to give No. 1 Answers of these 5 Survey Questions and in Part 2 The Family Member has 20 Seconds to do same as Part 1. When 1 or 2 of them are succesful to reach 200 points they win $5000 on ABC-TV and $10,000 on syndicated and they'll Play against the new challenging family. Otherwise as 2 Members of the family went Lower than 200 Points They win $5 for every point score (e.g.: 199 Points X $5= $995.) On January 2-7, 1979 The Show goes to 2 Nights a Week and on September 8-12, 1980 The Show became a 5-Night-a-Week that relates the ABC-TV 5-day-a-Week. On June 13, 1985 ABC-TV finally cancelled FAMILY FEUD and 1 year later The Syndicated portion terminated on September 12, 1986. On July 4-8, 1988 The FAMILY FEUD returned to Television and now on CBS-TV as The ALL-NEW FAMILY FEUD and now the new star is Ray Combs and now the new total cash winner is $300 (The Syndicated Portion re-released on September 19-23, 1988) and from 1989 to 1992 The FAMILY FEUD Winner Take All Jackpot Championship Tournament to be raise $400 to enter a special FAST MONEY is Worth $25,000 and all through $55,000 on CBS-TV and on Syndicated from $50,000 to $110,000. Later in the Tournament they cut the Jackpot Reward into $35,000 on CBS & $70,000 on Syndicated. On June 29-July 3, 1992 The New FAMILY FEUD Challenge has Created featuring the new game called "BULLSEYE" and now 3 Families. In Part 1, 2 Families played for $10,000 and by hitting the "BULLSEYE" with the No. 1 Answer to the 5 Survey Questions that valued from $500 to $2500 (Starting Reward: $2500) and after that The Survey Round has all 300 points to win and added an New Idea: Steal the points plus the value of an answer and in Part 2 The New Challenging Family faces The Recent Winning Family played for $20,000 and by hitting the "BULLSEYE" with No. 1 Answer to the 5 Survey Questions that valued from $1000 to $5000 (Starting Reward: $5000) and after that Which to be determined to become the new Winning Family and on September 10, 1993 CBS-TV cancelled "THE NEW FAMILY FEUD CHALLENGE" and Letting CBS-TV to air Local Shows to CBS-TV Stations. From 1992 to 1994 The New Game "BULLSEYE" is added and for the Last Season (1994-1995) and bring back Richard Dawson as the returning star of the show. The New Game replaces "BULLSEYE" with "BANKROLL". In Part 1 They give out $2500 and 3 Survey Questions are Valued from $500 to $2500 for "FAST MONEY" and now changed to 20 Seconds and in Part 2 They give out $5000 and 3 Survey Questions are Valued from $1000 to $5000 for "FAST MONEY" and now changed to 25 seconds and on September 8, 1995 The Syndicated Portion is terminated. On September 20-24, 1999 "FAMILY FEUD" return to Television for the syndicated process. The 1st Host is Louie Anderson and it's worth $10,000 in "FAST MONEY" and in 2002 The "FAST MONEY" Reward doubled to $20,000 and in 2002-2003 They'd Made Changes... Stealing the Bank Plus the Value of the Answer is Removed and the New Host is Richard Karn whom been Al Borden on ABC-TV's Home Improvement. Burton Richardson of "The Arsenio Hall Show" became announcer replaces Gene Wood and in 2006-2007 The Show Reassembled the Old Family Feud Survey Board and the new & present star John O'Hurley (J. Peterman on "Seinfeld" & The Brand-New "TO TELL THE TRUTH"). From May 25 to August 3, 2008..."The New Celebrity FAMILY FEUD" starring Al Roker of "NBC News TODAY" on NBC-TV. The Return of "THE FAMILY FEUD" will air into the 2008-2009 TV Season. The 2009-2010 Season "The Return of THE FAMILY FEUD" brought back "BULLSEYE" for $30,000 with the same question values from $1000 to $5000 (Starting Reward: $15,000) and with 5 wins gets a new car. In 2010-2011, Comedian Steve Harvey of "The Original Black Kings of Comedy" is now the new host and The 1st New Announcer of Ex-Member of N*SYNC named Mr. Joey Fatone and now this season 2015-2016 "The Return of THE FAMILY FEUD" is Mr. Rubin Ervin, The New Announcer.-----THE BROADCAST HISTORY of THE FAMILY FEUD: July 12, 1976-April 22, 1977 Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00PM on ABC-TV Eastern April 25, 1977-June 27, 1980 Monday-Friday at 11:30AM-12NOON on ABC-TV June 30, 1980-July 23, 1984 Monday-Friday at 12NOON-12:30PM on ABC-TV August 13-October 5, 1984 Monday-Friday at 11:00-11:30AM & 12NOON-12:30PM on ABC-TV October 8, 1984-June 13, 1985 Monday-Friday at 11:30AM-12NOON on ABC-TV July 4, 1988-January 11, 1991 Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:30AM on CBS-TV January 14-April 26, 1991 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00AM on CBS-TV April 29-May 24, 1991 Monday-Friday at 10:00-11:00AM on CBS-TV May 27, 1991-June 26, 1992 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00AM on CBS-TV June 29, 1992-September 10, 1993 Monday-Friday at 10:00-11:00AM on CBS-TV. On Syndicated from September 19, 1977 to the Present. May 25 to August 3, 2008 Sunday at 8:00-9:00PM on NBC-TV & Returned to ABC-TV for 30 Seasons after it's been cancelled by the same network's daytime area in 2015 and now Steve Harvey.moreless
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    Family Feud

    Family Feud

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    Family Feud is a long-running game show with a rich history. In 1999 the show returned in syndication with Louie Anderson taking over. From 2002-2006 Richard Karn hosted, but since then John O'Hurley has been the host of the program which is now entering its 11th season.moreless
  • 13
    Win Ben Stein's Money

    Win Ben Stein's Money

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    Comedy Central (ended 2003)
    Win Ben Stein's Money guide is an offbeat game show hosted by the actor and former Nixon speechwriter Ben Stein. It aired for six years on Comedy Central, winning four Day Time Emmy's (more info below) Reruns of the show air three times daily on Canada's Comedy Channel. Reruns also air on GSN everyday at 6PM and 6:30PM, and weekdays at 11:30PM (excluding Fridays). Win Ben Stein's Money won 6 Day Time Emmy awards and was nominated for 12. In 2004 it won "Outstanding Special Class Writing". In 2002 the show won "Outstanding Directing in a Game/Audience Participation Show". In 2000 the show won the Day Time Emmy again for "Outstanding Special Class Writing". Finally in 1999 the show won 3 awards, "Outstanding Audience Participation Show/Game Show", "Outstanding Game Show Host", and "Outstanding Writing - Special Class"moreless
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    Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?

    Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?

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    PBS (ended 1995)
    Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?, based on the popular computer game, was first seen in September of 1991 and became one of the most popular kids' game shows of all time. The series aired on PBS, probably the best place to reach it's target audience. Like the computer game, the game show's basic purpose was to ultimatly capture the head of an international crime syndicate. In this case, the head was Carmen Sandiego and in each episode she would send one of her henchmen out to steal a national landmark. The contestants job was to use their knowledge of geography to track each criminal from country to country and city to city with the goal of capturing the henchman, restoring the landmark to it's home, and whom ever got enough points would have the chance to capture Carmen. The game show was hosted by Greg Lee and the contestants were given orders from The Chief, played by Lynne Thigpen, who ran the ACME Detective Agency. Rockapella was the singing group that sang the popular theme song and helped give the contestants clues. The V.I.L.E. Henchmen Carmen's henchman consisted of Vic the Slick, The Contessa, Robocrook, Top Grunge, Eartha Brute, Patty Larceny and Double Trouble. The Contessa left at the end of the 1st season and returned in the 4th season with a new look. At the beginning of the second season, Kneemoi and Wonder Rat joined the ranks of the other henchman, followed by Sarah Nade in the 3rd Season. In 1996, the original format of the series came to an end. That fall, the series was redesigned and renamed Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego?
    Theme Song: "Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?" Written by: Sean Altman & David Yazbek
    Sung by: Rockapella Spinoffs: Where in Time is Carmen Sandiego? First Telecast: September 1991
    Last Telecast: September 1996 Episodes: 295 Color Episodes PBS Broadcast History September 1991-September 1996----Weekdaysmoreless
  • 15
    Celebrity Tennis

    Celebrity Tennis

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    (ended 1974)
  • 16
    Big Brother (UK)

    Big Brother (UK)

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    Channel Five
    Emma Willis Hosts the show on channel 5 with Marcus Bentley as the narrator of the daily highlights show. Since the original series of Big Brother in 1999 in the Netherlands, over 40 different countries have adapted the series with varying rules, all over the globe. The concept of the British series is similiar to the original series, as a group of people who've never met before are locked into a house, sealed off from the outside world and are recorded by dozens of cameras all day long. These Housemates are controlled by "Big Brother", an all-seeing entity whom we never see but frequently hear. Each week, after the other housemates have nominated the people they want out of the house and after the public decide who they want out, a nominee is evicted. After approximately three months, the public then vote for the winner, who wins a cash prize.

    The show is represented in the media by a eye, which has changed for each series, trying to incorporate a theme for the individual series. They are often released before the show actually began and are also used in the opening titles of the show. The theme tune by Paul Oakenfold and Andy Gray is released under 'Big Brother Theme' by Element Four - tweaks are made to the theme used throughout each series. Davina McCall presented the series since it's beginning in 2000 and until it's end on Channel 4 in 2010. BB2 and Ultimate Big Brother winner Brian Dowling took over when the show moved to five. Marcus Bentley has been present in the presenting team since 2000, narrating the daily show which showcases highlights from the previous day in a daily hour long show. However it should be noted that the show has only aired for seven nights a week throughout certain series, in series 8 for example the highlights of Friday and Saturday were shown on Sunday. The airtimes of shows often differ from series to series as well, for example during the ninth series the shows aired on Monday & Tuesday at 10pm, whilst Wednesday-Sunday highlights aired at 9pm (sometimes a little later on the weekend).

    Before each series of the show began on Channel 4, a teaser show aired, Dermot O'Leary hosted the majority of the shows, before his departure to ITV1 in January 2008. The Big Brother house is located in Elstree Studios, Elstree, Borehamwood. The house links directly to a staircase (adapted for each series), which leads down into a walkway, which is barriered off to hold the audience. The walkway leads into a tv studio, which from series one to nine consisted of a seat for Davina, a seat for the interviewee and screens behind them. In series 10 the format of this show was changed, Davina sat behind a desk, on her left hand side two celebrity guests or psychologists sat and on her right the evicted housemate, all three interviewed the housemate. The screen, introduced in the ninth series, was used when Davina talked to the house. Previously, she would of stood on the walkway and of talked to the house. Eviction shows aired in two parts on Friday nights, incoporating Thursday's highlights within the first hour long show. These shows were broadcast as live, however their was always a slight 5-10 minute delay as the following Saturday night highlights would show housemates leaving 5-10 minutes before we saw the housemate leave on the eviction show. The announcement of the evicted housemate was made at the end of the first show and then in the second show we would see highlights of the previous half an hour. Davina would then meet the housemate at the bottom of the stairs and lead them through the audience into the studio, she would then interview them about their time in the house. The Finale show went on for up to three hours previously and is broadcast as live, it never featured highlights of the final day in the house, but often featured the return of the previous housemates, seated in a area away from the rest of the audience. In series 2-8, Dermot O'Leary and from series 9 to 11, George Lamb (who co-hosted with Zezi Ifore, Michael Barrymore and Emma Willis) had hosted Big Brother's Little Brother, the show what brought viewers up to date with the latest from the house, featured housemates friends and family and revealed exclusive upcoming twists. After the nightly shows had broadcast, E4 broadcast Big Brother's Big Mouth, Russell Brand hosted the show when it began at the start of series 5 and left at the end of series 7, since then the series had contineud with one week stints of guest presenters. This format changed from series 10, as Davina took the helm and hosted one show a week on Friday nights for a hour. Throughout series two, on Saturday nights viewers could watch Big Brother Reveals More..., which showed a round-up of the weeks action from the house. This format returned in series 7 in the E4 only show Diary Room Uncut, which showed extended highlights from the week, mostly from the Diary Room's point of view, this show was axed after series 9. Beforehand in series 4-6, on Fridays in place of Big Brother's Little Brother at 7.30pm, that weeks nominations would air in full in Nominations Uncut. Throughout series 3 to halfway through series 5, the normal highlights show on a Saturday was replaced by Saturday Night Live, were we saw the housemates compete in live tasks to gain access to rewards for their time in the house. The show quickly became unpopular and stopped airing on the 26th June 2004. In series 7, Dermot O'Leary hosted Big Brother's Big Brain, which featured psychologists analysis of the housemates and events that had taken place in the house during the previous week, resembling the Sunday night highlight shows in earlier series. This was replaced by Davina hosting Big Brother: On The Couch in series 8, in a new timeslot. The show was heavily edited for daytime repeats to air on Channel 4 Breakfast in the morning and early afternoon on E4. The shows were also in later series shown on the HD output of the stations and the +1 channels. On a weekend the shows from the night before were also broadcast on teen strand T4. T4 was often first to air the follow up episodes, after the series has finished, which normally aired under the title What Happened Next, which took on many forms since it first aired, following the housemates from the past series around to see what impact the show had, had on their life. The show spouted many spin-offs, the most famous of which Celebrity Big Brother, was the most successful and although making two breaks due to other spin-offs Big Brother Panto and Big Brother: Celebrity Hijack, aired from 2001 onwards. A official announcement was made on August 26th 2009 regarding a renewal of the shows contract which was due to end in September 2010. It was announced that the show would be axed after airing it's last series in 2010 due to a large decline in viewing figures.moreless
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    Chained

    Chained

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    E4 (ended 2002)
    Chained was a British television game show that debuted in March 2001. The reality-style program featured six contestants (three men and three women) who were shackled together and forced to stay this way for seven days. Chained was billed as the "most extreme dating show ever filmed." At the end of each day, the contestants underwent an elimination round similar to that used by the wildly popular "Survivor" series. During the elimination phase, the leader of the chain would pick one contestant to eject from the program, thereby shortening the chain. By the end of episode six, the leader was left with the one contestant with whom they felt the strongest romantic connection. After the final elimination round, the chain leader was faced with a second decision: what to do with the five thousand pound prize. This was left entirely up to the leader: they could choose to split the money among the contestants, split it with their chosen winner, or keep the money entirely for themselves.moreless
  • 18
    The Weakest Link (US)

    The Weakest Link (US)

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    NBC (ended 2002)
    This British import, along with Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, helped kick off a brief game show craze. The host, Anne Robinson, the same as the British version, was frighteningly rude to the players, insulting their lack of knowledge with some acidic remarks and glaring looks. While the clock ticked down from two minutes, (ten seconds less each subsequent round), questions were tossed to each player. A correct response raised the bank, and each player could call out "Bank" before their question, to shift the winnings into the kitty. Any wrong answer, and the bank would revert to the first stage. A string of eight correct answers could give the team $125,000 per round. At the end of each round, the players voted someone off. That person had to suffer walking in disgrace across the stage, then giving a short opinion about losing. The last two played a final round, in which the bank was doubled, then faced each other in a best of five question showdown. Only one took home the money. The catch phrase, "You are the weakest link. Good-bye.", caught on with viewers. At one point in the summer of 2001, eight of the top 25 U.S. prime time shows were contests. 'Link's initial ratings were a big boost to NBC, which quickly added a second weekly time slot, and ordered a second season of episodes. However, during the aftermath of 9/11, and the Afghan war, TV schedules were disrupted, many shows were pre-empted, and the momentum slowed. In that winter, NBC cut the broadcast to once a week, on Sunday night, but then the NBA games often cut off the beginning of the show, and during the playoffs, shows were rescheduled for future dates. More and more special celebrity episodes were aired. Interest was falling, ratings dropped, and on May 16, 2002, Jeff Zucker, entertainment president, announced the cancellation. On July 14, NBC aired it's last new episode. Later that year, some of the unaired shows appeared on PAX network. This was a great relief to some of the game winners, who didn't get paid until the broadcast, and were sworn to secrecy under threat of lawsuits. The remaining episodes later aired on GSN, who had bought the rights.moreless
  • 19
    Crime & Punishment

    Crime & Punishment

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    NBC (ended 2004)
    "Crime & Punishment" has been described as a cross between a drama and a documentary or "drama-mentary". The series follows a real-life case from the San Diego County District Attorney's office from preparation through trial, presenting the case in a fashion similar to co-creator and executive producer Dick Wolf's "Law & Order" franchisemoreless
  • 20
    The Weakest Link (UK)

    The Weakest Link (UK)

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    Nick Jr.
    The Weakest Link is a game show started in the USA on Nick Jr. from 2001-2002. Hosted by Craig Charles (2001-2002) and Claudia Winkleman (2002). It was surpassed by The Challenge. The series features a team of contestants who take turns answering general knowledge questions. The object of each round is to create a chain of consecutive correct answers to earn an increasing amount of money for a communal pot within a specific time limit. The number of "links" in a chain are equal to the number of the contestants at the start of the show. An incorrect answer breaks the chain and loses all the money accumulated up to that point; however, a contestant can say "bank" prior to their question being asked, the accumulated money is stored, and the chain resets to zero. Six contestants competed to win a top amount of 50 000 (2001-2002) and 100 000 (2002) by playing a quiz/elimination contest. At the end of each round, each player is voted off as The Weakest Link. The original format features a team of six contestants who take turns answering general knowledge questions. The object of each round is to create a chain of six consecutive correct answers and earn an increasing amount for a single communal pot within a certain time limit. An incorrect answer breaks the chain and loses any money earned in that chain. However, before their question is asked, a contestant can choose to bank the current amount of money earned in a chain to a safe pot, after which the chain starts afresh. A contestant's decision not to bank, in anticipation that they will be able to correctly answer the upcoming question allows the money to grow, as each successive correct answer earns proportionally more money. When the allotted time for each round ends, any money not banked is lost, and if the host is in the middle of asking a question, or has asked a question but the contestant has yet to answer, the question is abandoned. Occasionally, the host gives the correct answer whether the contestant is able to answer the question correctly or not. The round automatically ends if the team successfully reaches the maximum amount for the round before the allotted time expires, and the next person says "Bank". Each round thereafter is reduced by 10 seconds as players are eliminated. The remaining two players have 90 seconds on the clock for the triple stakes round. The first person to be asked a question in the first round is the player whose name is the first alphabetically in the original version. Every subsequent round starts with the "strongest link"—the player with the most correct answers—from the previous round, unless that person has been voted off, in which case the second strongest answers first. The bank's target value was the maximum amount of money that a team could accumulate in any one round, and if a team reached the target and banked it while already having money in the bank (a rare occurrence), the bank would be augmented to the target value instead of having the target value added to the bank. The number of money amounts/consecutive correct answers needed was determined by how many players were originally on the team. The Money Tree (2001-2002): 5000 4000 3000 2250 1000 500 100 The Money Tree (2002): 10 000 8000 6000 4500 3000 2000 500 At the end of each round, contestants must vote one player out of the game. Until the beginning of the next round, only the television audience knows exactly who the strongest and weakest links are statistically due to Goldwell's narration. While the contestants work as a team when answering questions, they are at this point encouraged to be ruthless with one another. Players often decide to vote off weaker rivals, but occasionally opt to eliminate stronger players as well. After the revealing of the votes, the host will interrogate the players on their choice of voting, the reasons behind their choice, as well as about their background and their interests. After interrogation, the player with the most votes is given a stern "You are the weakest link. Goodbye!" and must walk off the stage in what is called the "Walk of shame." In the event of a tie, the strongest link has the final decision about who is eliminated. If they voted for a tied player, they have the option of sticking with their vote or changing it. The strongest link usually sticks with their original choice, unless another player in the tie has voted for them. Occasionally, the strongest link has voted for someone who is not in the tie, and so is forced to change their decision one way or the other. The final two contestants work together in a final round identical to the previous ones; however, all money banked at the end of this round is tripled and added to the current money pool, forming the final total for the game. At the end of this round, there is no elimination, with the game instead moving to a head to head round. For the head to head round, the remaining two players are each required to answer five questions each in a penalty shootout format. The strongest link from the previous round chooses who goes first. Whoever has the most correct answers at the end of the round wins the game. In the event of a tie, the game goes to "sudden death". Each player continues to be asked questions as usual, until one person answers a question correctly and the other incorrectly. The winner of the game takes home all of the money accumulated in the prize pool for the game, and the loser leaves with nothing, like all previous eliminated players. From 2001-2002, the maximum is 50 000 and In 2002, the maximum cash jackpot is 100 000. The winner of the game got to keep all the money in the bank, while the loser & 4 or 6 others would leave with nothing. moreless
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