Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Season 6 Episode 3

Sons and Daughters (4)

2
Aired Weekdays 11:00 AM Oct 13, 1997 on Syndicado
7.5
out of 10
User Rating
138 votes
3

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Stardate: Unknown Worf must help his son, Alexander, to learn the ways of a Klingon warrior, while on a ship patrolling for Dominion vessels. Meanwhile, Gul Dukat's daughter, Ziyal, comes back to the station from school on Bajor.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Weak Link

    6.5
    Alexander and Ziyal return for appearances in separate stories which are really more about Worf (in the A story on a Klingon ship) and Kira (in the B story on the station).



    The A story is a remake of the Western Rio Grande (1950), a film about a fort commander and a new recruit who turns out to be his hapless son. It takes Star Trek fans into uncomfortable territory, because we like Alexander and appreciate the side of him that is so un-Klingon. It's difficult to watch him suddenly want to be a warrior (for unexplained reasons) while turning into Star Trek's version of Steve Urkel. The point of the transformation, of course, is to set up a dilemma for Worf, creating a conflict between his responsibilities as First Officer and his instincts as a parent. But we like Worf too, and in the end he just comes across as a bad officer and a bad parent. (In fact, it's General Martok, who has some good one-on-one scenes with both Worf and Alexander, as the only one who seems to know what he's



    Eschewing Brian Bonsall (the actor who pays Alexander for most of the TNG episodes), the role of Worf's son is handed to Marc Worden, an actor five years older. The age situation isn't really an issue, because Klingons are aliens and there's no reason they shouldn't develop differently than humans. The problem, however, is that ... acts and speaks so differently than Bonsall, it's difficult to imagine they're playing the same character.



    Ziyal, on the other hand, is played by the same actress (Melanie Smith) who played her in the fifth season (when she became the third actress to play the part). In this B story she's there basically to serve as the innocent child while Dukat and Kira step into the roles of divorced parents who love her dearly but have issues with each other. Dukat wants to use his daughter to bring him and Kira closer together while Kira is upset that this seems to be happening. It's the perfect direction to take Dukat's character, with the writers having established him as the master manipulator and with a fancy for Bajoran women. For him, winning Kira after winning the station back would be the ultimate redemption, and it's interesting to see how Mark Alaimo plays it - with Dukat about as close as he'll ever get to having it all.



    Still, there's a war going on, and as an episode set within it, "Sons and Daughters" falls a bit flat.

    moreless
  • The weakest link in this epic sequence of episodes. The Kira story is probably the best part.

    7.5
    At this point I'm not sure there was much gas left in the Klingon genre. We get a return from Alexander, and he's now a whiny young adult instead of a whiny kid. It's kind of fun, as in "Soldiers of the Empire", to see a Klingon crew in action, but I wouldn't call it special.



    The Kira story is in many ways more interesting, as Ziyal's arrival almost generates a reconciliation between her and Dukat. But in many ways, it snaps the final chord of collaboration and sets Kira permanently on the path of resistance.



    Fortunately, the pace picks up after this episode.moreless
  • Worf's warrier-challenged son shows up as a member of his crew on a Klingon warship assigned to a dangerous mission protecting a convoy.

    7.6
    While I love Worf and enjoy most of the episodes that feature the Klingons, this episode was a disappointment. Bringing back Worf's son Alexander, who was and is basically a wimp as a Klingon, and putting him on a battle cruiser in the middle of a war with his dad seemed a bit too contrived. This episode appeared in between several excellent theme episodes that started with the beginning of the Dominion war. It just seemed unnecessary and uneven to revisit Worf's fatherly failures here.

    What saves this episode is the great character of General Martok and the depiction of life aboard a Klingon ship in battle. Always enjoyable!

    The "daughter" part is a side-story involving Dukat's daughter returning to the station with her father, causing more consternation for Major Kira.

    Not a terrible episode but just doesn't belong in this important timeline of the series.moreless
Armin Shimerman

Armin Shimerman

Quark

Terry Farrell

Terry Farrell

Lt./Lt. Commander Jadzia Dax (Season 1-6)

Michael Dorn

Michael Dorn

Lt. Commander Worf (Season 4-7)

Rene Auberjonois

Rene Auberjonois

Constable Odo

Nana Visitor

Nana Visitor

Major/Colonel/Commander Kira Nerys

Avery Brooks

Avery Brooks

Commander/Captain Benjamin Sisko

Marc Worden

Marc Worden

Alexander

Guest Star

Sam Zeller

Sam Zeller

Ch'Targh

Guest Star

Gabrielle Union

Gabrielle Union

N'Garen

Guest Star

Marc Alaimo

Marc Alaimo

Gul Dukat

Recurring Role

Melanie Smith

Melanie Smith

Ziyal

Recurring Role

J.G. Hertzler

J.G. Hertzler

Martok

Recurring Role

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