Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Season 7 Episode 24

The Dogs of War (8)

Aired Weekdays 11:00 AM May 26, 1999 on Syndicado

Episode Fan Reviews (1)

out of 10
134 votes
  • Cry havoc!

    Getting very near the end, Avery Brooks get a chance to direct the penultimate episode of his Star Trek series just like Patrick Stewart before him. This one is another smorgasbord of storylines that throws a lot at the viewer, though its various flavors don't always go well together.

    The meat of the episode takes place on Cardassia, with Kira, Damar, and Garak trapped on the world now occupied by the Orwellian-like Dominion. It's an interesting juxtaposition for Kira, who formerly was in the same situation on Bajor when it was occupied by Cardassia; but the real story here is about Damar becoming a Cardassian folk hero. It's the same story the show tries with Li Nalas to open the second season, but it works better in "Dogs" because it's developed more organically and Casey Biggs is a better actor than Richard Beymer.

    Meanwhile, the Ferengi have their story tied up with a Quark comedy runner that features the final appearances of Grand Nagus Zek, Quark's mom, Brunt, Rom, and Leeta. (Happily, Brunt and Weyoun, played by the same actor, finally appear in the same episode, with the writers/editor even having fun cutting from one character to the other. Sadly, we never get a "Brunt meets Weyoun" gag, which would have been even better). Not surprising for the Ferengi, we get a typical sitcom plot, weaving comedy out of confusion, but that's probably a fitting conclusion to these characters. Quark, in particular, deserves an episode to bring his story to a close, and Shimerman has some great moments. (The best part is writer Ron Moore parodying his own work, having Quark summon his inner Picard by declaring, "The line has to be drawn here! This far, and no further!")

    There are also C, D, and E stories, with virtually every other character getting their own moment, but some are more effective than others. Sisko has a couple of standout scenes, with Brooks again proving that he knows how to direct himself; meanwhile, Ezri isn't so good repeating her "awkward relationship" storyline from a few episodes ago, this time with Bashir in Worf's place. The diverse stories all lead to a bit of a disjointed episode; but for one that's set just before the finale, the whole thing is remarkably self contained... until the last scene. Serving as a cliffhanger, it feels like the first scene of the series finale.

    "Dogs of War" received an Emmy nomination for "outstanding makeup".

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