Star Trek: The Next Generation

Season 7 Episode 26

All Good Things... (2)

8
Aired Unknown May 23, 1994 on CBS
9.4
out of 10
User Rating
287 votes
11

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
All Good Things... (2)
AIRED:
Stardate: 47988.0 Shortly after Picard is diagnosed with a long-term, potentially debilitating brain disorder, he starts experiencing bizarre shifts into three main time periods: 25 years into the future, a few days before the Enterprise-D is sent on its mission to Farpoint station, and the present. Picard realizes that Q is behind these shifts through time. Q finally reveals himself that humanity is still on trial, and that Picard must stop an event in the future that will end the "threat" of humanity once and for all.moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Today
11:00am
BBC
12:00pm
BBC
Wednesday
11:00am
BBC
12:00pm
BBC
Thursday
11:00am
BBC
12:00pm
BBC
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A satisfying finale (part 2)

    10
    Patrick Stewart is the straw that stirs the drink in this mesmerizing finale with a plot (appropriately centered on Picard) that works with the pilot to bookend the show. Covering three time periods (with a puzzle connecting them) the episode moves at warp speed thanks to the time shifting, which brilliantly occurs with the audio changing time periods ahead of the visuals (leading to some cool cuts). Meanwhile, the plot weaves together big, high concept themes like time and existence with smaller character-based themes such as life, death, friendship and love. Adding to the joy is the authentic feeling of each time period, which makes the episode seem (within the show's framework) nostalgic, contemporary, and futuristic all at once. The cunning script even finds ways to exclude some of the "big seven" regulars in the past and future, which allows the show to sprinkle in guest stars without overwhelming the story or the viewers. And by wisely limiting the guest stars to one time period each (with the exception of John de Lancie), it allows for more of them than usual and creates distinct time periods that are easy for the audience to immediately differentiate. The glue that holds everything together is the dazzling performance of Patrick Stewart who owns every scene in the episode and sends the series on its way to feature films in spectacular fashion. And while "All Good Things" is not without its flaws (there are some gaping mistakes in the story if you think about it too much) the finale is infused with such love that it feels perfect especially for those who have watched and enjoyed the previous episodes of the show. It's as satisfying a conclusion as a fan could wish for.moreless
  • TNG deserved a better ending

    4.5
    My friends talked for years about this episode. I thought it was good, such as the other star trek ending. But I found something mediocre. The only thing that is objectively good is the outstanding performance of Patrick Stewart: I've never seen an actor perform that way. The rest of this episode is predictable, I mean after a few minutes the plot was kinda revealed and the only big question is how Capt. Picard couldn't figure out what was happening. I must confess that most of the episode I found myself laughing at some surreal scenes. Not to mention the Q part... just pathetic. I never really loved this show but it has been a very good one and an important piece of modern sci-fi and I think it deserved a better series finale.moreless
  • A fitting end to an awesome series

    10
    All Good Things is an awesome episode of Star Trek TNG. This episode combines some of the best elements from the series, Q, Data's curiosity and unfamiliarity with human customs and phrases, and antagonism between the Federation and the Romulans and Klingons. The plot of this episode is truly original with Q making Picard move through the 3 main time periods in his life, when he first started commanding the Enterprise, the "present", and 25 years in the future where Picard is diagnosed with Irumadic Syndrome, a degenerative brain disease. One has to wonder if everything thing that occurs in this episode is hallucination caused by Q or if it really happens. Twice in the future time frame, a ship is ordered to go to warp 13, is theoretically impossible as warp 10 is the same as being everywhere at once. Warp 10 is broken by Lt. Tom Paris in Voyager, with disastrous consequences. This episode is fitting season and series finale. One is left to wonder, what else will happen to the Enterprise in the future since the episode ends with everything being as it was in the beginning. This episode is great way to spend 2 hours watching TV, I highly recommend it!moreless
  • In the final installment, Picard jumps through time because of Q in order to save humanity from the judgment of the Q Continuum.

    10
    In perhaps one of the best episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation, the ensemble cast pulls together and kicks butt. The seven principle characters all show why they have such great chemistry on the screen in this farewell episode that has the Enterprise-D sailing off into the sunset at the final shot. Picard has to solve the conundrum of "anti-time" and why Q is trying to show him a lesson. In the end, humanity is spared by Picard's glimmer of a thought that perhaps what Q is showing him what humanity just might accomplish in the millennia ahead. A great ending to a great show!moreless
  • we say goodbye to the crew of star trek tng.

    10
    in this final episode in the long running series of star trek the next generation the captain is traveling threw space from the past to the present to the future with the help of our loveably Q. Q is showing him want could and will happen if they dont find out wants happening in each time line. this is a great final ending. we see the return off tasha and cheif obrein and a few others. its a great episode. my favourite scene is the end part which is a little emotional. as the crew sit down and play a game of poker and captain comes in. they ask if anything is wrong. he says no and wants to join them in a game. he looks around the table at each of him crew and says i should of done this a long time ago. its a very touching scenc.moreless
Patrick Stewart

Patrick Stewart

Captain Jean-Luc Picard

Jonathan Frakes

Jonathan Frakes

Cmdr. William T. Riker

Brent Spiner

Brent Spiner

Lt. Cmdr. Data

Gates McFadden

Gates McFadden

Dr. Beverly Crusher

Marina Sirtis

Marina Sirtis

Counsellor/Lt. Cmdr. Deanna Troi

LeVar Burton

LeVar Burton

Lt. Cmdr. Geordi LaForge

Martha Hackett

Martha Hackett

Talerian (Scene Deleted)

Guest Star

Patti Yasutake

Patti Yasutake

Alyssa Ogawa

Guest Star

Clyde Kusatsu

Clyde Kusatsu

Admiral Nakamura

Guest Star

John de Lancie

John de Lancie

Q

Recurring Role

Denise Crosby

Denise Crosby

Tasha Yar

Recurring Role

Colm Meaney

Colm Meaney

Miles O'Brien

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (4)

    • Picard and Data are the only characters to hold the same rank they started with, throughout the entire series. Other than in alternate realities, Picard started and finished with the rank of captain, and Data lieutenant commander.

    • The temporal energy generated by the anomaly causes Geordi's eyes to regenerate, allowing him to see. However his blindness was due to a birth defect not an injury, so the tissue reverting to an earlier state shouldn't have made any difference as there was no undamaged state to return to.

    • When scanning the Anomaly, Data states that the center has three tachyon pulses combining that all came from the Enterprise. However, the future Enterprise never scans the anomaly with the pulse, rather the Pasteur scanned it.

    • In the future time zone, after the future Enterprise leaves the area where the anomaly is supposed to be, it is stated that if the ship returns to the area, the anomaly may be there. However, if the anomaly gets bigger in the past, then how could it not be there at an earlier time, and be there at a later time?

  • QUOTES (12)

    • Yar: Captain, so far we have obeyed every order. No matter how far fetched it might have seemed. But, if we are to risk the safety of the ship and crew, I think we have to ask you for an explanation.
      Past Picard: I understand your concern, Lieutenant. I know if I were in your position I would be doing the same thing--looking for answers. But, you're not going to find any because I don't have any to give you. I know it is difficult for you to understand, but we have to take the ship into the very center of the phenomenon and create a static warp shell. Now, this will put the ship at risk. Quite frankly, we may not survive. But, I want you to believe that I am doing this for a greater purpose and that what is at stake here is more than any of you can possibly imagine. I know you have your doubts about me... about each other... about the ship. All I can say is that, although we have only been together for a short time, I know that you are the finest crew in the fleet and I would trust each of you with my life. So, I am asking you for a leap of faith... and to trust me.

    • Tomalak: So, Captain, how long are we going to stare at each other across the Neutral Zone.
      Picard: There is an alternative Tomalak. We each know why we're here. We could each send one ship into the Neutral Zone to investigate the anomaly in the Devron System.
      Tomalak: Has Starfleet Command approved this arrangement?
      Picard: No.
      Tomalak: I like it already.

    • Picard: I sincerely hope this is the last time I'll find myself here.
      Q: You just don't get it, do you, Jean-Luc? The trial never ends.

    • Worf: What is a Q?
      Tasha: It's a letter of the alphabet as far as I know.

    • Q: That is the exploration that awaits you, not mapping stars or studying nebulae, but charting the unknown possibilties of existence.

    • Future Picard: Q! Where's the anomaly?
      "Old" Q: What? Where's your mommy? I don't know...

    • Q: "My ship, my crew." I bet you're worried about your fish too.

    • Q: Goodbye Jean-Luc. I'm gonna miss you. You had such potential. But then again, all good things must come to an end.

    • Data: (to Captain Picard) Q's interest in you has always been that of a master and his beloved pet.

    • Q: The Continuum didn't think you had it in you, Jean-Luc. But, I knew you did.
      Picard: Are you saying that it worked? We collapsed the anomaly?
      Q: Is that all this meant to you.? Just another space anomaly? Just another day at the office?

    • Q: In any case, I'll be watching (Q's chair starts to retract back into the wall) and if you're very lucky, I'll drop by to say hello from time to time, see you out there!

    • (last line of series)
      Picard: So, five card stud, nothing wild; and the sky is the limit.

  • NOTES (13)

    • This episode was nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Costume Design.

    • This episode won an Emmy for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Special Visual Effects.

    • The footage of the clean-shaven, past version of Riker is taken from the Season One episode "The Arsenal of Freedom".

    • Patrick Stewart (Captain Jean-Luc Picard) and Jonathan Frakes (Commander William T. Riker) are the only actors to appear in every episode.

    • At 178 episodes, this is the longest-running Star Trek series.

    • Colm Meaney is the only cast member to appear in the series premieres and finales of both TNG and DS9.

    • Michael Dorn (Lt. Worf) and Colm Meaney (Chief O'Brien) are the only actors to appear in the finales of both Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

    • Three versions were at one time available on VHS:

      The originally transmitted two-part (45 minutes each) version, which was later released onto VHS.

      A movie version, tying both parts together (88 minutes approximately), which was released as part of the movie series.

      An extended movie version, with all the deleted scenes incorporated (over 2 hours), which was released as a Collector's Edition along with a 50-minute documentary.

      The latter version is now available on the Season Seven DVD, and the second version is now available on the TV Movie Series box set.

    • This scene was one of a few deleted scenes that were edited out of the final transmission, however, these scenes were re-incorporated (with no cliffhanger) for a special boxed set on VHS, the newly released Season Seven DVD, and shown as a special transmission.

      This version had no cliffhanger, and this and the other deleted scenes, were also restored for a special VHS box set, and the extended version was also specially transmitted.

    • Denise Crosby (Tasha), Colm Meaney (Chief O'Brien) and John de Lancie (Q) are the only actors, besides the regulars, to appear in both the pilot and the finale of the series (though Denise Crosby was a regular at the time of the pilot.)

    • The "old Q" scene (among other deleted scenes) was restored in the finale on the Season Seven DVD Box Set.

    • Martha Hackett, who later portrayed Seska on Star Trek Voyager, was to appear in this episode, but her scenes were cut.

    • Reportedly, in some versions of the episode, a scene was added before old Jean-Luc woke up and went to 10 Forward to explain his theories. This scene featured a conversation between him and an elderly-looking Q, which is where Jean-Luc drew his conclusions of Anti-Time from. (There are images from this scene publicly available depicting the old Q).

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

More
Less