Will humans ever step foot on a planet outside of our own solar-system?!!

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    Tronman100

    [21]Jul 20, 2007
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    Here's a website I came across about a book describing a type of "all electrical, reactionless" space engine that could get in theory get us to other planets in a realistic amount of time:

    http://www.stardrivedevice.com/

    I haven't decided if I want to buy the book yet though, lol.
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    ascensx

    [22]Jul 29, 2007
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    I imagine we're two, maybe three, centuries from that goal.
    If we don't destroy our planet before that, I imagine a human foot will be set foot on another planet outside our system.
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    sonatine97

    [24]Aug 6, 2007
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    During the Apollo, Skylab and early Shuttle eras I had high hopes that Man would finally get its act together and begin exploring the Solar System in earnest using man-made flight!

    Back then ... late 70s early 80s I had visions that by 2010 we would have lunar stations on the Moon,two Space Stations with docking capabilities: one circling the Earth and the other for the Moon. I also had visions that by 2020 we'd be landing on Mars and slowly colonising the planet.

    By 2040 Iwas hoping we'd have moved slightlyfurtherout within the SS and colonise the larger satellites of Saturn, Uranus or Neptune.

    Even back then I wasn't naive enough to think we'd resolve the problem of "warp"speeds or hyper jumps in order forHumankind to take the next "giant step" out of the SSwithin 2 or 3 hundred years, but I imagined it would happen sooner or later!

    However, that was what I hoped would've happened: but the reality is we've hardlytakeany steps at all other than for unmanned missions and theISS. We haven'teven revisited the Moonin over 30 years. At this rate we'd be pushed to see Marsbefore the century is out. And while wedelay the cost willkeep in growing to the point wherewe just won't be able to afford it: at least not individually but collectively perhaps. But then thinkof the political ramifications of a jointventure!

    One can dream.....

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    Wrath231

    [25]Aug 11, 2007
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    It takes time to travel long distances without warp drive..we'd probably need to resort to putting the crew in some sort of stasis a la "Space Seed".
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    Richiebcfc25

    [26]Aug 30, 2007
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    travelling to the nearest star system is about 1 light year away and to reach that you would have to travel at the speed of light for 1 year nothing can travel faster than light and einstein theory of relativity states the faster you go the heavier you become E=Mc2 which means you must have no mass at all to be able to reach light speed

    i dont think we will ever set foot in another star system maybe we might be able to explore other star systems but these would have to be automated with some kind of probe that we havent thought of yet

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    FrozenHeart_

    [27]Sep 7, 2007
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    Depends if humanity will kill itself before, If we dont.. Yes I think one day we will but I dont have any guess as to WHEN.
    I know it might seem impossible in theory, But keep in mind alot of things has seemed impossible in the past..
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  • Avatar of TelFan7

    TelFan7

    [28]Sep 29, 2007
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    Richiebcfc25 wrote:
    travelling to the nearest star system is about 1 light year away

    Actually it's 4.2 or 4.3 light-years away. Alpha Centauri/Proxima.

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  • Avatar of king_wah

    king_wah

    [29]Oct 5, 2007
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    I have just been readin Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything. The scales of just our Solar System are simply staggering. Judging by our current technology it would take a decade to get to Pluto. Beyond that is something called the Ork Cloud on the edge of our solar System which will take about 10,000 years.

    Edited on 10/05/2007 8:36am
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  • Avatar of lazyjay

    lazyjay

    [30]Oct 5, 2007
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    king_wah wrote:

    I have just been readin Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything. The scales of just our Solar System are simply staggering. Judging by our current technology it would take a decade to get to Pluto. Beyond that is something called the Ork Cloud on the edge of our solar System which will take about 10,000 years.


    It's called the Oort Cloud. Yes, the distances are enormous.

    The inner Oort Cloud is theorized to be a torus (doughnut) shaped region around 50 to 20000 AU from the sun, and the outer Oort Cloud is theorized to be roughly spherical and perhaps as much as 100000 AU (1.5 light years) in diameter. Both the inner and outer Oort Clouds are though to be sources of long period comets.

    Voyager 1, the fastest and furthest human artifact, is currently about 104 AU from the sun (barely breaching the inner Oort Cloud) and it has taken 30 years to get there. Currently it is traveling at just over 3 AU per year. In 40000 years it will make make its closest approach to one of our stellar neighbors - about 1.7 light years.

    Sorry - I didn't mean for this to turn into a boring lecture!

    Sadly, humans are not going to be visiting any other star systems within the next 1000 generations, maybe not even 10000. I'd be happy to be proven wrong though.
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  • Avatar of TelFan7

    TelFan7

    [31]Oct 10, 2007
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    lazyjay wrote:
    In 40000 years it will make make its closest approach to one of our stellar neighbors - about 1.7 light years.

    Pardon me - But the nearest star Alpha Centauri/Proxima is 4.2/4.3 light-years away!! Not 1.7.

    lazyjay wrote:
    Sadly, humans are not going to be visiting any other star systems within the next 1000 generations, maybe not even 10000. I'd be happy to be proven wrong though.

    Sadly, I highly doubt you'll be proven wrong. I think the human race is doomed to spend until the end of it's time only here in our own solar-system. WE'LL NEVER GET-OUT!!!! Unless FTL travel and/or short-cuts in time/space are found and we can utilize them (such as instant-teleportatin using holes, for example). But this WON'T HAPPEN, it's too good too be true, as they say.

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  • Avatar of lazyjay

    lazyjay

    [32]Oct 10, 2007
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    TelFan7 wrote:
    lazyjay wrote:
    In 40000 years it will make make its closest approach to one of our stellar neighbors - about 1.7 light years.
    Pardon me - But the nearest star Alpha Centauri/Proxima is 4.2/4.3 light-years away!! Not 1.7.

    Sorry, I phrased that poorly. What I meant was at it's closest approach to one of our stellar neighbors Voyager 1 will be 1.7 light years away from that star. I don'tknow the name of the star butit isnot one of the Centauris.

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  • Avatar of TelFan7

    TelFan7

    [33]Oct 10, 2007
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    lazyjay wrote:

    TelFan7 wrote:
    lazyjay wrote:
    In 40000 years it will make make its closest approach to one of our stellar neighbors - about 1.7 light years.
    Pardon me - But the nearest star Alpha Centauri/Proxima is 4.2/4.3 light-years away!! Not 1.7.

    Sorry, I phrased that poorly. What I meant was at it's closest approach to one of our stellar neighbors Voyager 1 will be 1.7 light years away from that star. I don'tknow the name of the star butit isnot one of the Centauris.

    Astronomers and Astrophysicists do say that there is a star (don't remember what it's called, but I think it's name begins with an N) that comes and goes from ours every million years or so or something like that. Is that the one? Otherwise Alpha Proxima is the closest at 4.3 light-years. That's why it's called Alpha-Proxima. Nearest proximity to us.

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  • Avatar of lazyjay

    lazyjay

    [34]Oct 11, 2007
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    TelFan7 wrote:
    Astronomers and Astrophysicists do say that there is a star (don't remember what it's called, but I think it's name begins with an N) that comes and goes from ours every million years or so or something like that. Is that the one? Otherwise Alpha Proxima is the closest at 4.3 light-years. That's why it's called Alpha-Proxima. Nearest proximity to us.

    I know where the "Proxima" in the name come from. It is the closest star however neither of the Voyager crafts are headed in its direction. Here's a nasa page about the Voyager Interstellar Mission. The star Voyager 1 will be relatively close to doesn't have a name, it is identified only by the catalog number AC+79 3888.

    I think the star your thinking of (starts with an N) is a theoretical star called Nemesis (sometimes also called the sun's dark companion) to quote Richard Muller from UC Berkeley
    "The Nemesis theory was devised to account for this regularity in the timing of the mass extinctions reported by Raup and Sepkoski. According to this model, a companion star orbiting the Sun perturbs the Oort comet cloud every 26 Myr causing comet showers in the inner solar system. One or more of these comets strike the Earth causing a mass extinction. The Nemesis theory was originally published in Nature by Davis, Hut, and Muller (vol 308, pp 715-717, 1984)." and later "Nemesis is most likely a red dwarf star, magnitude between 7 and 12. Virtually all such stars have been catalogued, but very few of them have had their distance measured. It is likely that Nemesis, if it exists, will be visible with binoculars or a small telescope." You can read more about it here.
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    puny_midget

    [35]Oct 31, 2007
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    All it takes is a single spontaneous burst of enthusiasm for the human race to begin colonising space. Some breakthroughs in theoretical physics, maybe a cultural resurgence to renew the public interest in space - basically time, hope, public interest and incentive.

    But once all the foundations are in place to take us up there,nations and corporations will certainly exploit the opportunity. And if this results in a second space race, well, we could be seeing space elevators, mass drivers on the moon and a colony on mars within another 50~75 years. It's only a step from there to the outer solar system, and in another few hundred years, to the stars.

    It's not that far off: NASA/ESA are already planning a moon colony by 2024 and a manned mission to mars by ~2030. Once the corporations catch up and a profitable mining/tourism industry is established, then it's only a matter of time.

    PS: Isn't 'Nemesis' also a short story by Asimov? I remember something about a massive disaster forcing humanity to abandon Earth... which could prove beneficial in certain ways...

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    DonZ7Z

    [36]Nov 2, 2007
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    ypu know TNG series has sparkled my interest for stuff like this, and when I look upon the stars some nights i can't help asking my self - is there any life out there, will we ever reach other planets far far away, and i always get the same pessimistic answer - hey you surely wont be around to see what happens. If your not going to pull a Riker and live for ever (which he told the captain in some episode can't remember which one=

    i'm out peace

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