Star Trek: The Next Generation

Season 6 Episode 12

Ship In A Bottle

4
Aired Unknown Jan 25, 1993 on CBS
SUBMIT REVIEW

Episode Fan Reviews (4)

8.4
out of 10
Average
194 votes
  • Witty Episode

    8.0
    Eschewing action for intelligence, this Picard/Data episode further explores themes begun in first season's "The Big Goodbye" and serves as a precursor to the issues with the Doctor on Voyager and Vic Fontaine on Deep Space Nine. Actor Daniel Davis reprises Professor Moriarty (first seen in second season's "Elementary, Dear Data"), once again bringing his warmth and charm to the part. Like some other TNG episodes, the writers have fun with "reality" and "fiction", intertwining the two, but in a more friendly and less demented way than something like "Frame of Mind" from later in the season. The witty conclusion is quite satisfying and, in fact, so good, it's reused in a Star Trek feature film.
  • Geordi and Data are enjoying a holodeck program. The holodeck program is variation of the Sherlock Holmes series. Data solves the mystery the thing is the guy who did it is suppose to be left handed. Geordi is the one who notices this.

    9.1
    Geordi and Data are enjoying a holodeck program. The holodeck program is variation of the Sherlock Holmes series. Data solves the mystery the thing is the guy who did it is suppose to be left handed. Geordi is the one who notices this. So, they send Barclay in to fix the holodeck. He fixes the holodeck. A hidden program still needs to be looked at. Barclay starts the program. Professor Moriarty appears. Barclay is shocked the holographic character wants to speak to Picard. So Barclay finds Picard and reenters the holodeck. Moriarty manages to leave the holodeck or does he?
  • Moriaty returns to wreak mind-fudging havoc

    8.0
    One of those episodes that you will either like or not. No real action here, but the threat of destruction posed to the Enterprise does enough to add a medium level of urgency to the screenplay.

    This is another of those intelligent episodes that delves into the phliosophical issues of existence and dabble into the subjects of consciousness and reality.

    I did find the whole aspect of Moriaty's consciousness an interesting concept and wished theyd done more with, but alas it was just bad from a writing aspect that the crew had apparently forgotten about him. What was worse was just how conveniently they had done it and for how long - 4yrs.

    However, the mischevious plot that Moriaty unleashes on the crew makes up for it and if you are watching it for the first time, I dare you to admit that you werent fooled too! :D

    I also thought the added complication of having the Duchess (Beacham's character) was great. She does a spiffying job of convincing us that her character is Moriaty's eternal soulmate.

    If the plot is the star of this episode, then the ending thankfully does a great job to match it. A clever little turn-the-tables ruse by Picard to get Moriaty to release the ship to him and leave him and the Duchess living in eternal bliss.

    I wonder if they ever make a sequel to TNG-DS9-Voyager that they will revisit plot threads like this one and provide a suitable conclusion to them!

    Again, dont expect hectic fight sequences, but an intelligent story will entertain you and the ending will leave you satisfied within.
  • A worthy adversary returns.

    8.5
    Professor Moriarty doesn't believe that the Enterprise exerted any effort in solving the conundrum that ended up trapping him 4 years earlier, and it's easy to believe him. That said, the idea of bringing him back from one of the more inspired season 2 episodes was a good one.

    Moriarty is a "worthy adversary", capable of matching wits with Picard. And indeed, he plays quite a ruse - one that will surprise the viewer quite a bit the first time. Picard's countermaneuver is just as clever, and perfectly appropriate.

    The ending is a charming one, as Moriarty and the Countess fly off into what they imagine is endless space. As the Enterprise officers speculate, who knows if they themselves are not living a fiction? Barclay's "test" of that question wraps things up perfectly.
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