Static Shock

Season 1 Episode 8

Sons of the Fathers

2
Aired Saturday 9:00 AM Dec 09, 2000 on The WB
9.1
out of 10
User Rating
30 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT

When Virgil meets Richie's dad for the first time, Richie storms off after he makes disparaging racist remarks towards Virgil. Things only get worse when the Meta Breeds kidnap Richie after discovering he's friends with Static.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Not enough episodes

    10
    Episodes who win me over are like this episode, ones who can actually talk about racism. I like Static Shock in general, but this one got me especially!
  • If only a handful of Static Shock episodes had reviews, this ought to be one of them.

    9.0
    This is arguably one of my most favorite episodes ever. But to make sure all the bias is gone, let me say that first of all, I am a Martin Luther King Jr. fan. I first heard of him at a young age, about 8 or 9, when I read a Discovery Box magazine about Nelson Mandela. It wasn't a while until I was learning about MLK in depth on my own. I love his oratory skills and his achievements in helping African Americans have the same rights as whites.



    Now back to the episode, Sons of the Fathers. Viewers can easily see that this episode is dealing with racism. I like this episode because it deals with racism, which is one of my most favorite themes to study, the story ends on a happy note (Richie's dad, the rasict in the story, decides to change his ways and be more accepting and understanding of his son), and this dialogue, that is probably Robert Hawkins' masterpiece.



    Mr. Foley (Richie's dad): What your son heard (about rascist statements),(Robert) Hawkins, I wasn't talking about him.



    Robert: No, you were talking about his KIND, that's all. And I know your kind, Foley. I've seen them all my life. A fine, outstanding biggot. His nose so close to the grindstone, he can't see anything else. Meanwhile, the world changes and grows and he's blind to it. Ignorant, and proud of that, too! And you know the worst part?



    Mr. Foley: I'm sure you'll tell me...



    Robert: You've got a terrific son. One of the best and brightest around. And 'cause of the way you are, you'll never get to really know him. Richie ran away from you a long time ago, Foley. And who could blame him?



    (end of dialogue)



    If the 100 point game was the symbol of Wilt Chamberlain's offensive dominance in basketball, then that dialogue was the symbol of Robert's understanding. The things he said there probably had said more things than all the other lines he said in the show. In those parts, he really revealed himself to be that type of understanding, willing to help type of person, which is something we rarely (or never) see in him.



    So if you are a customer of superhero shows that have a moral added, Sons of the Fathers is well worth watching. People who watch this episode might learn something along the way.



    -warriorofzeromoreless
Dan Lauria

Dan Lauria

Mr. Foley

Guest Star

Jean Smart

Jean Smart

Mrs. Foley

Guest Star

Brian Tochi

Brian Tochi

Shiv

Recurring Role

Tia Texada

Tia Texada

Talon

Recurring Role

Matt Ballard

Matt Ballard

Carmen Dillo

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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