The drama outside the drama

  • Avatar of osustudent06

    osustudent06

    [1]Nov 6, 2006
    • member since: 11/07/05
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    I touched on this in my review of Neveda Day (I), but wanted to get some feedback here.

    Part of what is making Studio 60 fun (or more difficult) to watch is the added drama of if the show will make it to next week. I find myself watching the show, checking the quality (always been there), and hoping that I'll be able to watch next week, and the next, and the next. I'm hoping if the show makes it, and this outside drama isn't there. The show will be that much looser, and then even better to watch. But, until NBC picks it up for the season, or it goes the other way, that outside drama will be there.

    Any thoughts?
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  • Avatar of Neptoony

    Neptoony

    [2]Nov 7, 2006
    • member since: 11/07/06
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    I agree the outside drama is there, but I don't find it FUN, it gives me a stomach ache!!! I LOVE this show, and it so deserves to be picked up. It is not ho-hum, watch-what's-on tv. I sit down to watch it with shivering expectation, real anticipation. What I used to feel for Lost. Which I still watch but it doesn't have my heart anymore, Studio 60 claimed it this year.
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  • Avatar of ebroyr2

    ebroyr2

    [3]Nov 9, 2006
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    Really don't understand the way American television goeas about axing TV shows. Even if it's not great there are always people who watch it religiously and it just p*sses them off if what they love gets axed when they're getting into it.
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  • Avatar of showpolish

    showpolish

    [4]Nov 10, 2006
    • member since: 02/20/06
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    ebroyr2 wrote:
    Really don't understand the way American television goeas about axing TV shows. Even if it's not great there are always people who watch it religiously and it just p*sses them off if what they love gets axed when they're getting into it.


    well they ax them because if not a lot of people watch the advertisers can pay less for commercial slots... and it is all about the money...
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  • Avatar of bill__b

    bill__b

    [5]Nov 10, 2006
    • member since: 05/30/06
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    TV shows get axed for mostly monetary reasons. There is that shark jumping thing related to failing creativity. But that's usually followed by viewership reduction, advertising revenue decline and then (sometimes) notification that the producers need to make a series finale episode. The overarching problem is that TV has been "free" for so long, the concept of paying for your entertainment is having a deucedly hard time getting going. If there were a coin-slot in the TV that enabled the viewing public to "vote" with their quarters, things would still depend upon the money, but at least some of the middle-people would be out of the loop.

    Six million viewers at 25 cents each would pay for just about any TV series program around these days. Of course there's the problem of collection and distribution, but what the hell's the internet for anyway? Oh sure, reruns would be tricky, but perhaps broadcast itself has become obsolete and just hasn't died yet? All shows eventually go direct to DVD and distributed via netflix or its ilk. Pornography has already learned how to do it. The high-toned producers will eventually take notice. Y'all bought your stock yet?
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  • Avatar of Acovell

    Acovell

    [6]Nov 10, 2006
    • member since: 10/28/06
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    The fact that Studio 60 is doing as well as it is is a major coup, and I think NBC knows that.  Television shows about show business are notoriously unpopular with middle America.  (No slams to middle America here -- they just don't care about show business because it's not part of their daily lives like it is in big cities.)  NBC went into this with their eyes open, and I think they made a good choice.  This is witty, grown-up, adult fare, and will appeal to a smaller audience than something like "Deal or No Deal".   The audience it does appeal to is upscale and has money.  There's your demographic.  It's not so much about the numbers as it is about the amount of money those viewers have to spend. 

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