Studio One

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CBS (ended 1958)

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6.7
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Studio One

Show Summary

Studio One, presented by Westinghouse, was one of the first of the anthology TV programs. A total of 466 episodes aired on CBS between 1948 and 1958. The program appeared in various time slots before finally settling in on Monday night. Like a number of other 1950s and '60s television shows, Studio One was moved over from radio, where it had started in the mid-1940s. Studio One was aired in the following time slots:
November 1948 - March 1949 -- Sunday 7:30 - 8:30 March 1949 - May 1949 -- Sunday 7:00 - 8:00 May 1949 - September 1949 -- Wednesday 10:00-11:00 September 1949 - September 1958 -- Monday 10:00-11:00 By 1957, live TV was giving way to filmed shows, and the industry was migrating from New York to Los Angeles. The show was renamed Studio One in Hollywood and started airing filmed shows. Westinghouse stopped sponsoring the program and a year later, Studio One was gone. The show was nominated for numerous Emmy Awards throughout its run; it was nominated for Best Dramatic Series every year but won only once in 1952. The episode "Twelve Angry Men" (shown in photo) won 3 Emmy Awards (for Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Writer) in 1955.moreless
Betty Furness

Betty Furness

Spokesperson (1949-1958)

John Cannon

John Cannon

Announcer (1950 - 1958)

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • The definative example of what made television revered by it's first audience, the live dramatic anthology.

    9.7
    Among the reasons CBS was known as the "Tiffany" network was this excellent series. It was created by pioneer tv writer/producer/technician Worthington Miner, and the material selected was consistantly top-notch, with production and acting talent coming from Broadway talent.

    Through the years such stars as E.G. Marshall, John Forsythe, Charlton Heston, Betsy Palmer and Leslie Nielson would participate.

    The magic of a live performance was Studio One's (and most of TV's) most exciting attractions, and audiences could tell the diiference when Video Tape was introduced in the winter of 1956/7. But this was not the worst, that came with the migration of television to Hollywood, just as the movies had done forty years earlier. Live shows (or even the double-talk catagory "Live on Tape" shows) were dropped one by one in favor of filmed ones. The major reason this far costlier production was chosen was because live ones, if they were recorded, were on less-than perfect kinescope film. Tape was then so valuable, a kinescope of it would be made and the tape recycled. But with film, a show could go on to make new money again and again through syndication.

    The sponsor, Westinghouse, went along and a new film dramatic anthology was produced for them by one of the new power centers there, "Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse".(Which alternated once a month with the "Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour"). Even the longtime Westinghouse spokeswoman from Studio One, Betty Furness, came along to now give film demonstrations of the various appliances on offer. but audiences never built up any interest in these shows, and they all faded away in the early 60's as the second generation of viewers settled in.moreless
  • MAKE SURE YOU ORDER YOUR DVDS IN TIME FOR COZY TELEVISION VIEWING DURING THE HOLIDAYS! WITH COMPLETE SERIES LIKE THE SOPRANOS AND FIREFLY AND CLASSICS FROM THE WALT DISNEY VAULT YOU'LL NEVER GET BORED!

    November 11, 2008 DVD Releases

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