ABC (ended 1961)



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"For the 1957-58 season ABC offered to purchase a full season of thirty-nine episodes of Cheyenne, but Warner Brothers declined. Since each hour-long episode took six working days for principle photography alone, the studio couldn't supply a new episode each week. Because Walker appeared in virtually every scene, it was also impossible to shoot more than one episode at a time. Consequently, Warner Brothers developed a second series, Sugarfoot, to alternate with Cheyenne. "In a gesture that would characterize creativity at Warner Brothers, the studio designed Sugarfoot as only a slight variation on the Cheyenne formula. Will Hutchins played Tom Brewster, a kind-hearted young drifter who travels the West while studying to become a lawyer. Toting a stack of law books and an aversion to violence, he shares Cheyenne Bodie's penchant for meddling in the affairs of others. But whereas Cheyenne usually dispatches conflicts with firepower, Tom Brewster replaces gunplay with a gift for rhetoric—though he knows how to handle a weapon when persuasion fails. The series was more light-hearted than Cheyenne, but otherwise held close to the formula of the heroic loner." (Christopher Anderson) "SUGARFOOT, SUGARFOOT, easy lopin', cattle ropin' SUGARFOOT, Carefree as the tumbleweeds, ajoggin' along with a heart full of song And a rifle and a volume of the law. SUGARFOOT, SUGARFOOT, never underestimate a SUGARFOOT, Once you got his dander up, ain't no one who's quicker on the draw. You'll find him on the side of law and order, From the Mexicali border, to the rolling hills of Arkansaw; SUGARFOOT, SUGARFOOT, easy lopin', cattle ropin' SUGARFOOT, Ridin' down to cattle town, a-joggin' a-long with a heart full of song And a rifle and a volume of the law."moreless
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  • Sugarfoot

    The "big 4" Warner Bros westerns were what I absolutely loved to watch. My father was a big fan of Maverick. This is absolutely what I remember about the 'golden age' of TV. The cast was always outstanding, and the plots were stuff that remains with me today.