Tarzan Lord of the Jungle

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CBS (ended 1977)

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7.3
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Tarzan Lord of the Jungle

Show Summary

The jungle...this is my domain...and I protect those who come here. For I am Tarzan, lord of the jungle. This Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle cartoon was produced by Filmation. Filmation is no longer around and many of the rights to their shows were sold. Most of them were owned by Hallmark Entertainment Co. But, Hallmark sold all of their Filmation properties to a British media company called Entertainment Rights. Tarzan is one of those shows. There were a total of 65 episodes produced and are as follows: 1st Season (1976) - 16 episodes - Shown as Tarzan, Lord of the Jungle 2nd Season (1977) - 6 episodes - Shown as part of The Batman/Tarzan Adventure Hour 3rd Season (1978) - 6 episodes - Shown as part of Tarzan and the Super Seven 4th Season (1979) - 8 episodes - Shown as part of Tarzan and the Super Seven 5th Season (1980) - 16 episodes - Shown as part of The Tarzan/Lone Ranger Adventure Hour 6th Season (1981) - 13 episodes - Shown as part of The Tarzan/Lone Ranger/Zorro Adventure Hourmoreless
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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Animated adventure series, set in modern-day Africa, featuring Tarzan, the muscular, scantily clad hero of movies, television, popular novels, comic books, and newspaper strips. The graphics were great; and the stories were both imaginative and involvingmoreless

    8.0
    Animated adventure series, set in modern-day Africa, featuring Tarzan, the muscular, scantily clad hero of movies, television, popular novels, comic books, and newspaper strips. The graphics were great; and the stories were both imaginative and involving.



    His sidekick is N'kima, a careless little monkey who offers comic relief, is frequently in need of saving, and provides Tarzan with an excuse to explain plot developments when nobody else is within listening distance.



    Tarzan lives in the jungle with N'kima, faces a different - often improbable - nemesis each week, almost always gets into a precarious situation, but always recovers to save the day - usually with the help of his friends.



    The artists' renderings of Tarzan are excellent and are comparable to the best comic-book and newspaper-strip depictions of the character. The range of movements over the course of an episode is impressive, although some of the action is annoyingly repetitive.



    Tarzan's personality in this series is derived from the comic books and newspaper strips. Unlike most movie depictions, he is a civilized hero with good English language skills. However, unlike the popular novels from which he originated, he is an exceedingly benevolent hero. His body count with respect to both humans and animals in the series is extremely low, perhaps even non-existent, for even comic-book and newspaper-strip standards.



    Despite his basic strength, agility, and jungle senses, Tarzan is a vulnerable hero. His interventionist tendencies often land him into trouble. Fortunately, he has accumulated many animal friends who are willing to help him when called. In addition, his basic goodness allows him to win much-needed friends among the strangers he encounters along the way.



    The villains often require a suspension of disbelief (e.g., Romans, Vikings, Spanish conquistadors, talking apes, aliens, Atlantians), but they are consistent with the comic-book and newspaper-strip traditions of the hero.

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  • The Ultimate portrayal of Edgar Rice Burroughs famous character!

    10
    Let me start this review with a few things. This show brought many of the elements of Edgar Rice Burroughs Tarzan and Pellucidar novels into it. Tarzan is intelligent and well-spoken, something that some portrayals of the jungle lord are not. His friend and sidekick is N'Kima the Monkey, not Cheeta the Chimpanzee. Cheeta was created for the Johnny Weissmuller movies and I hate those movies and the character Cheeta. This series also uses much of the Mangani language. The Mangani are the creatures who raised Tarzan, if you have read Tarzan: the Lost Adventure then you will know that the Mangani are not apes but somewhere between Ape and Human, thus explaining why they are capable of speech. Also it should be noted that the Bolgani which is what the Mangani call gorilla's are capable of speaking the Mangani language, an ability held by all of the non-human primates besides the humans who were raised by them or learned their language. Another element that was used, was the various Lost Cities and lands. This is something which made a large impact on the novels and many of the cities were revisited. You could meet a variety of ancient cultures in these stories and this was reflected in the series. The animation in this is based off of the art of Edgar Rice Burroughs favourite artist, Burne Hogarth. That alone makes it fantastic! Also this series takes place in the early twentieth century which was when the first Tarzan novel was written. So check out this show, you can watch some episodes on the internet, which is where I watch them.moreless
  • IF YOU DON'T HAPPEN TO HAVE ENOUGH TEENAGE DRAMA IN YOUR LIFE, THE COMPLETE FOURTH SEASON OF ONE TREE HILL IS AVAILABLE THIS WEEK. FOR THOSE BASEBALL FANS OUT THERE, THE BRONX IS BURNING IS A GREAT WAY TO REVISIT THE 1977 WORLD SERIES. AND IF YOU EVER WONDERED JUST HOW INDIANA JONES GOT TO BE THE WORLD-CLASS ACT THAT HE IS, CHECK OUT VOLUME TWO OF THE YOUNG INDIANA JONES CHRONICLES.

    December 18, 2007 DVD Releases

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