Tarzan Lord of the Jungle

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CBS (ended 1977)

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Tarzan Lord of the Jungle Fan Reviews (2)

7.3
out of 10
Average
44 votes
  • Animated adventure series, set in modern-day Africa, featuring Tarzan, the muscular, scantily clad hero of movies, television, popular novels, comic books, and newspaper strips. The graphics were great; and the stories were both imaginative and involving

    8.0
    Animated adventure series, set in modern-day Africa, featuring Tarzan, the muscular, scantily clad hero of movies, television, popular novels, comic books, and newspaper strips. The graphics were great; and the stories were both imaginative and involving.

    His sidekick is N'kima, a careless little monkey who offers comic relief, is frequently in need of saving, and provides Tarzan with an excuse to explain plot developments when nobody else is within listening distance.

    Tarzan lives in the jungle with N'kima, faces a different - often improbable - nemesis each week, almost always gets into a precarious situation, but always recovers to save the day - usually with the help of his friends.

    The artists' renderings of Tarzan are excellent and are comparable to the best comic-book and newspaper-strip depictions of the character. The range of movements over the course of an episode is impressive, although some of the action is annoyingly repetitive.

    Tarzan's personality in this series is derived from the comic books and newspaper strips. Unlike most movie depictions, he is a civilized hero with good English language skills. However, unlike the popular novels from which he originated, he is an exceedingly benevolent hero. His body count with respect to both humans and animals in the series is extremely low, perhaps even non-existent, for even comic-book and newspaper-strip standards.

    Despite his basic strength, agility, and jungle senses, Tarzan is a vulnerable hero. His interventionist tendencies often land him into trouble. Fortunately, he has accumulated many animal friends who are willing to help him when called. In addition, his basic goodness allows him to win much-needed friends among the strangers he encounters along the way.

    The villains often require a suspension of disbelief (e.g., Romans, Vikings, Spanish conquistadors, talking apes, aliens, Atlantians), but they are consistent with the comic-book and newspaper-strip traditions of the hero.
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