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For much of Season 3B, Teen Wolf has gestured pointedly toward the past. From Stiles' early inability to read his World War II textbook to Allison's mysterious voicemail from 70 years prior and again to a villain dressed in 1940s military uniform, Japanese-American relocation during the war has remained an obscure but ever-present shadow over current events. Finally, "The Fox and the Wolf" provides a lengthy flashback in which most of the earlier details are explained. It's Teen Wolf's first real attempt at historical criticism and commentary, and at least in my mind, it does so with mixed success.

I understand that this commentary is always secondary to the story Teen Wolf is otherwise telling, which is of course up to its usual high standards, but I can't help but consider the attempt: what Teen Wolf did right and where it disappointed.



What It Did Right...

1. "The Fox and the Wolf" is a timely reminder of a shameful policy in American history. In response to race prejudice and war hysteria following the attack on Pearl Harbor in December of 1941 and the Ni'ihau Incident in the days immediately after, President Roosevelt signed into effect Executive Order 9066 (text here) in February of 1942, which authorized the military detainment of civilians designated by the Secretary of War as a threat. The overwhelming majority of interned citizens were Japanese Americans in the Pacific states, which were designated "exclusion zones". While these camps never approached the brutality of concentration and extermination camps under Nazi Germany—whose atrocities, as they became known in the later years of the war, would hold a very troublesome mirror to North America's own domestic wartime measures—the practice of systematically relocating and detaining citizens because of their racial heritage is indefensible under any conditions. Nevertheless, these offenses have often been overshadowed by the war itself and the Holocaust.


(Image from Tule Lake, California)

2. The vulnerability of the internment camp residents is unmistakable. These are people living largely at the mercy of their captors. They are dependent for food, which is not always entirely sufficient, and subject to their discipline with little recourse for injustice. There are several documented instances of detainees being shot and killed by guards claiming they attempted escape or exceeded the boundary of the facility. The further ability for the Oak Creek atrocity to be covered up at any administrative level betrays their defenselessness.

3. The central conflict in the flashback highlights institutional corruption and war profiteering. The practice of diverting supplies during wartime and selling them on the black market is an old one and unfortunately a not infrequent one as well. (It's also a popular motif in wartime film, including notably Harry Lime's penicillin racket in The Third Man.) The abuse of administrative supervision by the camp doctor and the two soldiers Hayes and Merrick over the medical supplies results in the death of a young boy Michio and ignites the riot. It's a strategy, if somewhat saccharine and sentimental, that puts a face to an often faceless crime. (£20,000 for every dot that stops moving from atop the Ferris wheel, so to speak.)




Where It Dropped the Ball...

1. The conditions of internment for Teen Wolf's Oak Creek detainees are significantly improved from the historical evidence. In particular, food and sanitation were very real problems in WRA internment camps. With war rationing beginning in 1942 for the entire country and significant food shortages for perishables, the internment camp residents often suffered from nutritional deficiency. Milk, meat, cheese and fruit were in particularly short supply. Additionally, the large number of internees were housed in tightly confined barracks with poor waste disposal built in fields with poor drainage, turning many of the yards between buildings into mud traps sometimes more than ankle-deep.


(Image from Minidoka, Idaho)

Teen Wolf is just far too pretty. Even for the most pleasant of WRA camps, detainees were cramped, camps were isolated, and luxury goods were scarce. Arden Cho looks spectacular in 1940s fashion with her bright red lips, glossy red nails, and beautifully arranged hair, but the realities of camp life—even though they were allowed to bring a personal suitcase—would make this kind of up-keep highly impractical. The facilities themselves—both the living quarters and the associated buildings, including Eichen House—are well constructed. Even the camp fence at Oak Creek is an elegant wrought iron gate instead of the barbed wire and chain variety common for these facilities.



2. Noshiko Yukimura is the camp's most prominent (perhaps only) thief. She's also a kitsune. While her supernatural abilities make her an exceptional pilferer, her trickster personality and impish theatrics also suggest she enjoys it, much like Kira's own first foray into breaking and entering and evidence tampering. There's an underlying glee in her deception and an innate contempt for rules, one that motivates her to take risks with a careless disregard for the possible consequences for the larger community in the camp. It's a trait she's called out for by Satomi, a (seemingly) older lady-werewolf, as we later discover. While it's very deft character development, Noshiko's temperament compromises Teen Wolf's portrait of historical injustice. It makes for excellent storytelling but uneven historical criticism.

3. What Noshiko steals is sometimes frivolous and unnecessarily reckless.Stealing apples and painkillers is easy to defend, but Noshiko steals a baseball. She may steal it for young boy Michio, but she must realize that it will go missing, and it's difficult to imagine that the simple thrill of stealing one of the thuggish guard's toys isn't a significant factor in her decision, and it's one that draws immediate attention from the soldiers. When she's seen just later hiding a jar of hard candy, her thieving habits are even more difficult to justify, especially in light of Satomi's accusations. Ultimately, Noshiko's (and thereby Teen Wolf's) decisions trivialize the very real needs the internment residents have, including nutrition and medicine.

4. "The Fox and the Wolf" ignores the dangerous and exploitative undertones of Rhys and Noshiko's romance. This is perhaps my strongest objection to the flashback storyline. While the previous three undermine the implicit historical criticism of this era of American history, they all contribute in interesting ways to the immediate characterization of Noshiko and the future trajectory of Teen Wolf's plot. This romance, on the other hand, not only recasts the conflict as a love story, but is also blindly dismissive in very troubling ways. The vulnerability of internees, mentioned previously, is not limited to explicit shows of force. When creepy Merrick harasses one of the female residents during their abbreviated search, it's evident that he's out of line. But the exploitative potential for a soldier using his clout to disguise a prisoner's stealing and offering her treats as presents (for which he receives kisses in return) is very, very unsettling. It's a more subtle and more silent manner of rape, one that exchanges the unspoken protection from harm for sexual favors. Teen Wolf never plays this possibility as such. Instead, it plays the romance straight. It's not that a real romance isn't possible, but "The Fox and the Wolf" white-washed some of the more subtle violation that happens in these situations. In the end, Rhys would have been a stronger and more morally admirable character if there were no reciprocation for his sympathy and kindness.





So, how do you think Teen Wolf did with its internment camp flashback? Are you happy with the tone it struck for both the history and the story? What compromises are you pleased with and which ones, if any, are troubling?

A related note: Satomi, the werewolf, is easily my favorite character in the flashback. I think she provides a wonderful foil for Noshiko, a different perspective on their detainment and a different strategy for survival, and I'm eager to know what happened to her. You?
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When I saw the episode I was incredibly angry, probably in part because I still remembered Davis's claim of what he stated this show would be and how season 3b had some really good moments but it had also tons of stupid, insulting, sexist and downright stereotypical or even racist things and this episode embodied that.

I agree with your points and actually think you have been too soft on them.

First Kira and Noshiko as "foxes" is in my mind completely wrong and if they are "vulpine" they seem rather like the European Reynard (and even then barely) than the Japanese "kitsune" (actually whenever they referred to themselves as "kitsune" I was rolling my eyes since its nothing more than the Japanese term for the fox). They have not a single power that is typical for foxes in Japanese folklore and religions (the closest was the "nogitsune" and that one I would have simply assumed to be an akuma or maybe an Oni if not told otherwise), nor are they foxes in any way. I never read any of Kira's or Noshiko's powers in any book about foxes, not in Japan, nor China or Korea. Even what the show stated as "kitsune" sounds to me not only copied from pure fiction but partially verbatim from the English Wikipedia article on them and that one has some serious flaws. For the most part what we saw of Kira was stereotypical fighting with Japanese weapons (which she "picked up really fast" from unknown sources), in fact she never used her electric powers for fighting despite all the opportunity she had. For me they are "super-Samurais mixed with watered down weaponless Japanese martial arts" and that in a very clumsy way, just like the "oni" are for me just supernatural ninjas and nothing more, they look nothing like Oni, they act nothing like Oni but they act like Ninjas (dark colors, move in shadows, have katanas, live in the darkness), so why should I consider them Oni?

In addition neither Kira nor Noshika seem particularly fox-like too me, especially not Kira who is rather the stereotypical shy Asian girl who, especially in season 4, needed white people to get out of her cocoon and didn't really do or progress much on her own except where her Mary Sue powers where concerned.

Now what has that to do with the Internment camp episode? Well common fox-powers in Japan are shapeshifting, illusion, flying, bewitching and the fox-fire (usually a whill-o-the-whisp light or fire). These powers would have been very useful here and of course would lead to the question why she doesn't do more but at least would have explained a few things, like how she managed to go undetected.

In addition the number of people in this "internment camp" was ridiculously low. It would have made more sense as a civilian assembly center or detention camp.

Noshiko's actions where probably one of the worst decisions you could have made at that time, she even brought a weapon into the camp (btw. the guards didn't check for that?) but yet we are supposed to side with her apparently.

Also not only does Noshiko of course have a romance with a guy that is of the same physical type as Colton Haynes aka Jackson (the type we saw time and again in nearly every new guy that is more than extra ever since the start of season 3), which is totally stereotypical (Asian female – white American male) but why couldn't it be two guys (albeit then they probably would have made the Japanese guy totally small and effeminate) or they could be childhood friends who ended up on two sides of the conflict? In Nazi Germany people hid Sinti and Jews but in America something like this would not happen? Also none of her actions apart from summoning that spirit fall back on her (and even there she had it comparatively easy), despite it being one of the worst decisions you could have made. She basically steals food and equipment, undermines the military structure via sex (of course) and brings a weapon to camp. She could as well have had a sign around her neck saying "I am the yellow peril incarnate, you are right to fear me."

The camps also lack any sort of self-government of the Japanese, I did not feel any of the actual hatred American's felt for the Japanese and remember this episode was after Pearl Harbor, when American soldiers where already collecting body parts as trophies in the Pacific war since 1942 at least, and they probably hated the Japanese more than any other enemy in their history. There are no racial slurs like Jap, monkey or Nip, no mentioning of the war even remotely, nothing at all that made these times so horrible.

And when it comes to the actual killings:

That old Japanese woman cannot control herself but our main teenagers have barely any problems? Not to mention, where was she during the massacre? She was suddenly there with not a scratch on her and only some disheveled hair (so the spirit could not have gotten to her) and we saw how fast she could run so where was she? Why didn't she try to protect some people? She was the only one there with any chance at saving anyone.

And if this weren't enough, later in season 4 when we see her again (and she looks at best 10 years older despite more than 60 years having passed) we only get Rhys's death as the only reason for her actions, the show could have just as well said "she has a bad conscience because she killed a white guy" since they didn't care to show any of the Japanese victims of the slaughter in the flashback.

And as for the "cover-up" of the slaughter: Considered the intense hatred Americans had for the Japanese even at that time, and which increased over the following two years, I have my doubts that anyone would have covered the massacre up. Wouldn't something like that be oil for the fire of anti-Japanese hatred? Especially since apparently only two Japanese women survived.

But I was not surprised that they would do something like this. World War II has been especially romanticized and whitewashed since the 1990s and I had my suspicions Teen Wolf would do that ever since the start of season 3b.

I personally think they shouldn't have done such an episode if they do not have the budget or will apparently to do it properly.

And as for the claim that American TV always takes such liberties:

1) That is not an excuse, in fact such liberties often become the actual "truths" since most people get their information from popular culture and not history books and documentaries. Accuracy is important here, especially when you consider what they currently play on the History Channel.

2) Teen Wolf is still marketed as a horror show. And I don't know about you, but I see no horror in this show. And horror shows by their nature don't white-wash/cushion things, but Teen Wolf does that all the time since the end of season 2, heck does Scott now actually dress and act as if his family is struggling with money?

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The article is well written and had good points but I think you're over thinking it. This kind of TV is supposed to be entertaining whether it is accurate or not.
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The character Rhys was one of my favorites. It was subtle how corrupt he was but the potential to be a monster was always implied.
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What is your assessment of his character based on?
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Very well written :) I think I agree with everything you've written. But while I was watching the episode, the blatant glamorization of the camp disturbed me so much that I didn't enjoy the good aspects that you've pointed out here. I was extremely disappointed with the entire episode and all the flashbacks.
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I love me sum Teen Wolf. Have never missed an episode. But after Season 1, I stopped watching for story logic or accuracy. I very often get the feeling that each episode is produced much like a music video--with emphasis being placed more on style rather than substance. So while I agree with many of the points you described, I trust that none of these issues come as a surprise to anyone--least of all the show's producers/writers.
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Wow, I couldn't disagree more...except with the bit about loving me some Teen Wolf. It has a consistency, narrative tightness, and "story logic" that most television shows—of any genre, not just supernatural teen drama—should aspire to, which typically makes scouring for details (in current and previous episodes) very rewarding. I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "accuracy" since there's normally not much outside it's own logic to be accurate to. It joins many of its horror inspirations in crafting elaborate dream-like sequences and rich, trippy imagery, but even these maintain an internal logic.
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Hey there, I don't have much to add and main points have been already discussed below, but just watned to congratulate you on your analysis. Very cool and well written! Cheers.
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I think I would have liked the episode more if it weren't so close to the season finale, that kind of exposition should not be tied as close as it is to the climax of this storyline, it's just that there are a lot of plot points to be addressed that I am not sure that it will be accomplished by the finale.

If you look at the finale of 3A they made this whole thing about Peter wanting to steal Scott's powers and they just haven't done anything about it and I find it so convoluted to add it to the last couple of episodes.

To be honest I would like the last few episodes to focus on the kitsune/nogitsune part of the story, and the whole Malia/Peter situation for season 4, I'm sure they could find a clever way to address it, I just don't know if it can be accomplished the way it should be by the time of the season finale.
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Nicely written.

I think most of your criticisms are answered by the fact that Noshiko was a kitsune, and not a more conventional detainee: Her "trickster" nature makes frivolous theft without regard for consequences entirely in-character, and the fact that she is an apex supernatural being with several centuries under her belt would seem to suggest that, if anyone was being taken advantage of, it was Rhys.

And while I agree that the cleaned-up image of Japanese internment camps fell a little short of the "harsh history lesson" some of us were hoping for, I'd argue it hit all of the necessary points in a manner that suited Teen Wolf---this isn't Schindler's List, after all, and I'd rather it stay that way.
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Thanks. No, you're right. Teen Wolf should not be Schindler's List. That would be very strange, but it does seem like Teen Wolf wants to have its cake but not the calories. It wants to be a history lesson, but it doesn't want to commit to what that might mean. I'm very happy Teen Wolf doesn't preach even as it makes its social (and here historical) points, but for its social criticism it maintains a high degree of nuance and ambiguity and realism that I thought was lacking in "The Fox and the Wolf".

I've been thinking about this since I wrote up the post, partly in response to other comments and partly because I re-watched the episode, and I also suspect that a lot of my disappointment with "The Fox and the Wolf" is the tone the flashback sets. Not entirely unlike Season 3A's heavily flashback episode "Visionary," which I also thought failed to realize a lot of its potential, it lapses into sentimental melodrama in several places. Just like I wanted "Visionary" to do more with its supremely unreliable narrators—it dabbles, but doesn't impress—I wanted "The Fox and the Wolf" to be more mystery, less soap. And that tone, which begs for tears even as it cheapens the emotional substance, streamlines and minimizes human experience generally. That it also coincides with Teen Wolf's attempt at history just makes it more evident.

Incidentally, I entirely agree about Noshiko's characterization as a kitsune. But, largely because she is literally the voice of the story, her own perspective on her actions takes precedence over competing ones.
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I don't have much to add to the thoughtful comments already provided. I agree with most of the posters that it is actually pretty remarkable to see a show like this use internment caps as a central feature for an episode, let alone as a core element for the Season's story arc.

There are parts where the imperatives of the story run up against history, but the priority should be the story so I don't fault them for that in principle. That being said, I find the 'love story' aspect a bit irritating and unnecessary. Does everything on a 'teen' show have to be grounded in a love story? I would have basically found any other relationship more compelling. Not using a love story would have also addressed a few of concerns identified by Harpier. But for me that is a small criticism in the big scheme of things.

I did find Noshiko's behaviour, and appearance, odd as compared to the present day - which made it seem like her historical self in the camp was acting in somewhat arbitrary ways to advance the plot. The first 850 years seems to hardly touch her - physically or emotionally - the the next 50 or so are pretty harsh. So it is hard to reconcile her behaviour in the camp with her behaviour today. Perhaps releasing the Nogi and using her tails accounts for that though, so again not a major criticism of the overall approach to the camps.

As I said above, I agree with most of the responses that this was actually a strikingly good episode in terms of shedding light on a dark time, even if it wasn't perfect. As part of the story, I thought it was fine, but not outstanding - but I'll comment on that in the main episode thread.
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Fair criticism, but you also have to realize that television shows do take liberties with historical facts for multiple reasons. This isn't a movie or even a television on premium networks that is given a lot more freedoms than shows on MTV, WB, FOX etc. Showing the true harsh conditions of camps might not have been option. For all we know the show might have had to make compromises to get the interment camp flashback to air on the network. It is not historically accurate to the letter that doesn't mean it dropped the ball.

It was important that this show actually portray a dark moment in US history that is usually glossed over in public school history classes. Getting it out there on a popular television show is a huge step in the right direction in getting more people who aren't history majors in college to learn about it. It is important that they succeeded in capturing the injustice of it, but did it beautifully with soldiers mocking the medic for saying it was temporary relocation when it was really imprisonment. It's like my professors have said there are going to be liberties taken with shows and movies that tackle historic events, but so long as they can capture the spirit and do it justice that it is good way of reaching people who aren't particularly going to continue history past high school level or general ed requirement for colleges.

On your second point is too harsh. Remember yes this was a real tragic event, but this was of the television and storyline they want to show. Kira's mom being a young trickster who plays Robin Hood. I don't think this portrayal is betrayal of historic event. In times of tragedy people would make up stories about a hero or person coming to save the day or fix it. This one of the reasons legends and folklore come into are created. In works fiction this done all the time. Captain America and Superman were created in responses to the state of the world. I wouldn't say either of them undermined the historical events of WWII or the Great Depression. Here your expecting historical accuracy to win out over the story, which shouldn't be. If this was a historic documentary or a show that focused on Japanese interment camps I would agree with you, but it wasn't. That's also why feel your third point is too harsh. It was about Kira's mom being reckless and irresponsible at times and paid the price for it. Kira's mother was nearly 900 years old at the time. From her perspective would be different from a normal mortal human who feels fear and knows there is a time and place for acting out or stealing. Kira's mother looks back at this time as with regret shows she made mistakes that she regrets like other people.

I disagree with your assessment on the romance. I never felt he was exploiting her for sexual favors or that a romance was white washing these events. It was a playful banter they had going on that is not out of place with even real romances. As you yourself said it showed there were soldiers abusing their power and harassing the women, so it wasn't the show was using the romance to scape goat or brush aside the sexual abuse and potential rape in their situation. Don't get me wrong I like someone cared enough to comment on this episode and how it portrayed true historical events. I do think we have to remember there is a fine line between accurate portrayal to the point where it costs with writers of doing what they want to do a story.
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This was a very thorough and interesting write-up; I commented on the importance of this in the other recap thread, but I'm glad to see this here, it deserves its own thread. It's very rare that any TV show, let alone one marketed for teens or younger folk, to broach such a heavy subject.

I guess they toned down the reality of the camps because they didn't want to go too far - same reason why the ladies had impeccable hair and make-up, it seems more important to depict beautiful people on the screen than historical accuracy. A shame, but at least this depiction is a step in the right direction from no depiction.

The only comment I have is on your 4th point. I completely see your point, and I think if this had been a full-length film, this should have been addressed at least. As it stands, it was a 40 minute episode, and addressing the complexity and ethical dilemma of this situation was not feasible; also it went against their over-all narrative, the tragic irony of realising who the Nogitsune was originally. I don't think this is so damning in the end; they acknowledged exactly how easy it was for the guards to abuse their power over female prisoners. I think that was their attempt of showing how these dynamics could play out in a terrible way as opposed to the genuine love story between our medic and our fox.

In any way, good job bringing this to discussion. I hadn't really considered the 4th point the way you argue it, but I definitely see how problematic it could be.
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First: Absolutely. Almost any attention paid to this historical period is better than no attention. And I appreciate that, as it has with everything else, Teen Wolf doesn't brow-beat with its tone. And Teen Wolf is nothing if not beautiful, for sure! Never has there existed a town more full of gorgeous people than Beacon Hills. (And that includes every show on the CW!)

As I point out in the responses below, the nogitsune's love of twisted irony is well on display in his selection of Rhys, and the romance between Rhys and Noshiko furthers this, no doubt. And, like you, I don't ultimately think any of this is damning—especially since most of it works well within the bounds of the nogitsune narrative, if it's a little underwhelming as historical commentary. It just simplifies some of the moral dynamics in ways that Teen Wolf is not typically wont to do, and since I found this flashback episode less dense and less nuanced than most (but not all) of Teen Wolf's other episodes, I think it could have incorporated more of these aspects without making a "point" of them. In other words, it was a very clean story, very neat. I don't think it needed to be.

Also, and it probably contributes more than I'd like to admit to my distaste for the romance, I wasn't at all moved or inspired by the romance. It felt hollow, especially since Teen Wolf has been able to make more of less with other pairings. But then again, as Derek and Jennifer prove, they've also made much less with more, so...there it is.
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I guess I don't agree with your last point (and also in general, it likely was important that this was 1943 and the conditions and the attitude of the detainees was still very much like they had been there for like a month and were still assuming this would pass) as that it totally within the nature of a flirtatious dynamic between the two (especially where the woman in that relationship was over 850 years old) and probably to me was meant to call back to the ice skating date of season 2 where Stiles offered Lydia her Reeses'. Both for the silliness of the name similarity but also to point out that Reese and Stiles are probably not all that different from each other (though literally, Reese and Scott are probably a lot alike since Reese didn't have the snark) and there is something darker about the Nogitsune choosing that particular type for host.
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I'm ENTIRELY on board with your final point. The selection of the nicest (Rhys) and the most beloved (Stiles) as his victims definitely seems to be part of the nogitsune's twisted modus operandi. Whether or not there are other reasons he chooses whom he does, these two make it all the more sinister.

I know Noshiko was at the time over 800 years old, since she says as much, but she never feels very mature in the flashback. She's cocksure and stubborn and willful, especially in contrast to Satomi. I think a lot of this can be attributed to their relative supernatural identities and the strategies each forces them to take to survive. Because she has had to work every month to control herself, to temper her reactions to keep from killing everyone, Satomi is more patient, more scarred and ultimately more sensible. Noshiko's impish kitsune personality and magical healing powers, which shows no indication of having previously caused her trouble, makes her overly confident to the point of believing herself invulnerable. That it causes her so much trouble in 1943, I think, is easily the source of her more guarded and cautious and not a little broken attitude now. I think this same feeling of invulnerability both makes her romance with Rhys more plausible, but it blinds her as much as anyone to the possibly problems with this love interest.

I hadn't even flashed to the Season 2 product placement. Hm? Obscure. And oblique. But I'll think about it.
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Ummm. I'm not really undestanding where some of the areas they dropped the ball are coming from. First, I really liked Satomi as well.

I will agree somewhat on the conditions of the camp, there probably should have been some more harsh conditions but I thought we got the point.

#2, #3, and #4. I totally disagree. Especially with the last one, I think the love affair between the two was central to the story of why she partially felt the need for revenege and calling the nogitusune. Both herself and her lover were "killed" by the corrupt guards/doctor. I don't read the sexual exploitation of Noshiko, the whole scene with the candybar I thought was supposed to represent a sweet, (no pun intended) moment, between lovers. Historically, I find the whole scene/idea very realistic. There is no doubt that these situations arose in the internment camps. History is full of slave masters that actually had forbidden romances with their slaves etc. etc. The "bad" guards view of the women I thought also accurately portrayed what was going on.
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Your point about the aesthetics of a teen-ish television show is well taken. EVERYTHING in Teen Wolf is prettier than it is in real life, none more so than Scott's impossibly beautiful "pack"...all of them.

With #2-3, as I try a few times to at least mention, they play into the other things Teen Wolf is doing very neatly, and so they're not a "problem" in the larger storytelling. Instead, what I mean is that as part of Teen Wolf's first attempt at a sustained examination and criticism of this era of American history, which it's been slowly building throughout Season 3B, it prioritizes the characterization of Noshiko as a kind of Puck-ish trickster and impulsive revenger to the detriment of its historical commentary. By doing this "The Fox and the Wolf" advances its characters and plot but undermines (and sometimes unintentionally trivializes) its own portrait of the internment camp.

I think most viewers agree with you about the Rhys-Noshiko romance. And I certainly agree that Teen Wolf plays it as innocent and genuine. And I also agree that it explicitly plays a part of Noshiko's desire for revenge—and it's exactly what the nogitsune exploits for his own darkly ironic turn for her prayer—but I don't think the romance was necessary to motivate her revenge, particularly if you wanted to play the injustice of the internment camp itself. Wanting vengeance for one's fellow detainees, even for a friendly guard, could easily have been enough. Playing it as romantic melodrama seemed cheaper to me. I'm also far, far more cynical about the troublesome power disparity in any type of this romance, particularly that between slave owner and slave. There is NO WAY that relationship ever even approaches equality of consent. Whether or not feelings are mutual, I have an inherent ethical problem with this kind of relationship.
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