The Benny Hill Show

Season 1 Episode 2

Show 2

0
Aired Unknown Dec 25, 1969 on ITV
9.3
out of 10
User Rating
3 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Benny opens with "Juanita Bonita Dolores." Also featured: "Holiday Sport Spectacular," "The Short Happy Life of Maurice Dribble," and a parody of "This Is Your Life"; plus more things that go wrong on television, and musical numbers from The Ladybirds ("Can't Take My Eyes Off You") and Eira Heath ("Wedding Cake").moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Some of Benny's finest sketches ever can be found on this episode.

    10
    One of my all time favourite episodes of the show. The Holiday Sports Spectacular is a fantastic series of little skits featuring Benny in a variety of different sport. The football skits are especially good, with Benny doing everything from feigning injury to pushing and shoving players out of the way to using 'amazing' ball control (i.e. the ball clearly being attacked to his foot). The wrestling skit near the end is an interesting and very funny one too. Great stuff. Then you have The Short Happy Life Of Maurice Dribble, which is one of Benny's greatest ever silent sketches. Uisng the sped up Victorian music, Benny takes up through the life of the this man who does everything from have fun at school/university to joining the army to going to the old folks home. The ending is priceless, with the character dying from a game of strip poker with a nurse. An unmissable sketch, one of Benny's greatest. The TV bloopers skits are brilliant, some of his best ever, with the western one's being the best of the bunch after he finds more and more ways to mess up the scene. The Glden Shoots skits in this one are also great, with the shots not going quite as planned. Is This Your Life was also a very silly skit, with Benny playing all the characters from this old man's life, incluing an appearance by Fred Scuttle. Overall a brilliant, unmissable episode that you'll want to watch over and over again.moreless
Eira Heath

Eira Heath

 

Guest Star

Tommy Mann

Tommy Mann

 

Guest Star

Robertson Hare

Robertson Hare

George Podmore

Guest Star

Nicholas Parsons

Nicholas Parsons

 

Recurring Role

Michael Sharvell-Martin

Michael Sharvell-Martin

 

Recurring Role

The Ladybirds

The Ladybirds

backing singers

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (1)

    • Eamonn Andrews (Nicholas Parsons): So, you are Stan Moore from Romford?
      Ron Moore (Benny): No, I'm Ron Moore from Stamford. I am married, I have 15 children, and my hobby is flying my kite.

  • NOTES (5)

    • "The Short Happy Life of Maurice Dribble" sketch marked the debut appearance on The Benny Hill Show of two pieces of stock background music that will become as synonymous with the series as the ending "Yakety Sax" theme. First was what would come to be called "The Benny Hill Waltz," originally written by Paul Lewis under the title "Ballroom" and included in the "Music De Wolfe" library disc album History Book of Music (10", DW/LP 3031, 1967). In 2002, Lewis would record and release a commercial-issue CD, Three Decades of TV Themes (Campion Cameo 2018), which contained a newly-recorded version of this immortal number. The second was a harpsichord piece called "Doublet and Hose," also from the History Book of Music album and likewise composed by Mr. Lewis. Both numbers would be used on sped-up silent sketches on the show through 1980. Also heard towards the end of the sketch, in the scene where Maurice (Benny) and a nurse (Yvonne Paul) were playing strip poker, was another Lewis composition from the LP, "Stately Home."

    • Thames repeated this episode on November 20, 1971. It is the earliest Benny Hill Show to be rerun.

    • This episode was taped on Nov. 30, 1969, after the making of Show 3. It is also the first edition (in terms of recording) to lead off with the "classic" color Thames opening fanfare, the particular variation of which (with the bottom half in a "ripple" effect) will be in use up to Show 28; after Show 29, a modified version (with the bottom half now a non-rippling mirror image) will take effect.

      The taping of this episode fell on exactly the same day as that of Monty Python's Flying Circus Episode #10, which featured such now-classic moments as "It's a Tree", the "Vocational Guidance Counsellor" sketch, and Ron Obvious' attempt to jump the English channel. It was the only time in the history of both shows that episodes of each program were taped on the exact same day.

    • This episode, on its original airing, was seen in 3.75 million households - the lowest figure for any Benny Hill Show on Thames Television until the 1980's when public opinion in Britain was systematically turned against Hill and his show. (If the post-1977 audience-measurement formula of 2.2 people per household were figured in, that would translate to 8.2 million viewers.) The low ratings (this, after his number one debut) convinced Thames not to schedule any future holiday editions exactly on Christmas Day, rather a few days before or after.

    • While taping the wrestling sketch with Tommy Mann as his opponent 'Two-Ton Grudge', Benny sprained his ankle from tripping over a camera cable.

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • EAMONN ANDREWS (Nicholas Parsons): You left school and you took on several jobs: A saggar maker's bottom knocker . . . an olive stuffer in a pickle factory . . .

      During the "Is This Your Life?" sketch, the host was recounting the jobs that subject George Podmore (Robertson Hare) held over the years. The "saggar maker's bottom knocker" reference was to an occupation that cropped up from time to time on the British version of "What's My Line?", hosted by the real-life Eamonn Andrews (1922-1987) on the BBC from 1951 to 1963 and on Thames from 1984 until his death. The definition of a saggar maker's bottom knocker is explained in the website uk.gameshows.com.

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