A The Blacklist Community
Thursday 10:00 PM on NBC (Returning September 22, 2016)

Love him or hate him or go to a drag show with him, no one denies that Hoover built the FBI into the most powerful law enforcement agency in the United States. And one of the main tools he used to accomplish that was carefully crafting the agency's image.

Now I'm not on here to hate on The Blacklist. With all its stupidity, I'm actually quickly hating that I'm beginning to LOVE the show! To list the things that are so wrong (a military helicopter hovering a few hundred feet over a brownstone in Georgetown) would take all day. So let's skip all that. To mention that Agent Borg Queen's husband, Mr. Wet-Panties/Possible Killer, says "I understand" and "Sorry" in every other sentence is something for another day.

But even though the FBI seems to only exist so Red can make it look stupid, does it have to be THIS stupid?




Last I checked, it is very difficult to become an FBI agent. And I know this just a TV show, but com'on! Agent Growling MacStereotype has only three ways to think: complain, threaten, then reluctantly agree. It never crosses his mind to use the vast resources of the FBI to quietly dig up what Red is really after. And his superiors are even worse. They think in two modes: No-We-Won't/We-Have-No-Choice-But-Agree. When Agent Borg Queen actually accidentally fell into accessing highly classified material, the bosses -- who answer to the Attorney General -- just decide to keep an eye on her. Really? A potential serious breach of NATIONAL security, and posting agents outside her house it the best they can do.

Then there was "The Stewmaker." I was doing fine until Red kills the Stewmaker, the FBI and SWAT bust in a minute too late, and no one treats the cabin as a major crime scene. I was waiting for an agent, any agent, to say: "Uh, yeah. There's a body dissolving in acid in the other room. Shouldn't we, you know, not to be picky, but, um -- investigate? It IS in our agency name. What? Oh, Red said he killed himself. Well, case closed!"



Of course it's just a TV show. But after decades of crime shows ranging from "Hill Street Blues" to "Law & Order" to "C.S.I.," either the writers believe the viewers are stupid, or are counting on the idea that we don't care that the FBI is that stupid.



Again, I do like to show (thank you James Spader). but if had been around when J. Edgar was still around, the FBI agents would have been the smartest people in the room (and weekly beating up on Red). The FBI agents don't have to be creative geniuses in this show (like in "The X-Files"), but stop making them look like they can't walk and chew gum at the same time without Red telling them how.
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Hoover was no better than the 'criminals' he went after. He was guilty of exhortion, cover ups, bribery, etc. The man should have ended his days in prison. The thing that saved him, was He knew where all the bodies were buried so speak, and he wasn't above extortion to get what he wanted. So I am thing murder wouldn't have been out of the question, as long as it protected his position.
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The *actual* J. Edgar Hoover would wonder why everyone had strayed from the important mission of hunting for secret communists, homosexuals, and civil rights activists.
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I am sure if one looks closely and critically into The Blacklist you can find plenty of stuff that goes against FBI procedures and sometimes against common sense. And yet, I find a little suspension of disbelief makes this show quite enjoyable.
I can see that the Spader character can be irritating and annoying but he is more intriguing than your average evil mastermind and the show has made the good choice to leave his agenda pretty vague.
Personally I do not think he is looking out for "Lizzie" out of the goodness of his heart but my working theory (very probably wrong) is that his getting close to her is part of some plan to draw a powerful player out (Lizzie's real mother or father). In my theory the cute husband is there to protect her perhaps at the behest of one of them.
Whatever may happen in the overriding arc of Red-Lizzie, I find the cases are, if not terribly interesting in themselves, they are presented in original-ish ways & they are successfully interwoven into the main arc, like this last "Stewmaker" which was like a creepier version of Dexter. The flowery use of music and the somewhat heavy-handed editing makes it into a visually attractive show to watch though it is perhaps an acquired taste too.... But with all the boring repetitive stuff out there, The Blacklist is at least a bit different unlike The Following that is such a bore for example.
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Exactly my sentiment.

Also: It's called fiction for a reason. And as long as it is entertaining to watch, I'm game. If I want facts and realism, I'll listen to NPR.
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Totally! Just because it is fiction, it still has to be logical unlike say the last season of Dexter but just as we can 'believe' in sci fi / fantasy elements in a fairly logical show like say Game of Thrones, I think it is possible to believe in a simplified version of the workings of the FBI... As long as within that simplified/modified version of the world they act according to their internal logic /mythology which The Blacklist is more or less doing thus far...
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I'm doomed myself in regards of this show, because I don't even like Spader on it. His character is a bad character. The kind that needs people around him to look stupid so that he can look smarter, the kind that needs all the time people around him to say "you are a monster" to look more like a tough guy. All the depth that they have been trying to give to the character so far, it just goes down to play flat for me. Cause when I see him, I just see a bald guy talking arrongantly. Ugg.
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I watch solely cos I'm a fan of Spader. Having stupid irritating FBI agents whine and bitch at every twitch of Red's eye is kinda boring. I like Marge Simspon's allegory above. Kinda sums up how the show is.
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This is not an FBI show. It is a drama about a master criminal who protects an FBI profiler, for whatever reason. Such master criminals do exist. They are most often referred to in trade craft as "independent contractors". They are hired to do things formal organizations are prevented by regulation or law from doing. They are useful in counterintelligence operations. They join with entities to assist in the successful completion of clandestine operations (commonly referred to as "black ops"). They can be very dangerous because they most often work for the highest bidder. However, on occasion one can develop a relationship that transcends the high bidder syndrome. This is what makes this particular TV show work for me.
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Hoover would have made sure the Agent in charge was smart, and the rest able to take orders. He also would have been the first one to sign the deal; as long as he could take credit for taking down each of those names.

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Where is the "Angel Station Hotel"?
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Right next to Angel Station :)
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I bet you didnt watch The Following then you'd seriously have plenty to complain about! I for one find parts of it quite plausible....and suspend belief for some parts. But honestly its not as bad as in lotsa other shows.
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Am with you on all that. On top of everything The Following was just SO boring, I could hardly get through the premiere
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Oh - I DID kind of like special agent Ressler's quick thinking when Red put him on the spot in the latest episode, though (S01E04) - it was the first time I've seen him be really competent at something.
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The days of J. Edgar Hoover are long gone. FBI agents largely get their jobs by being well connected. Most of their busts are made because of information they get from whistle blowers and guys looking to make deals for leniency. Also in real life there are no criminal masterminds, as dumb as FBI agents are, criminals are usually dumber. The portrayal of stupid incompetent FBI agents is so realistic it's frightening.
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Of course there are mediocre and even near incompetent agents. But guess what? They don't have long careers. When I lived in DC, I knew several people in the federal law enforcement/intelligence community. Take my word for it, they didn't get their positions because of a frat brother or daddy knew someone. And they had quite a bit more of an education than an A.A. degree from the local community college. Then last year, when I accidentally found the unannounced back entrance to the NATO Summit in Chicago (it's a funny story), the swarm of FBI and Secret Service Agents giving me the "just one wrong move...." stare sure appeared pretty damn competent to me (I could feel the sniper rifle cross-hairs on the back of my head). So it sounds to me that you may be getting your information from TV and movies. I've dealt with the real thing.

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I DO agree. The dumbing down of the FBI has annoyed me, and the constant verbal stings from Red are unnecessary: "Oh, you're doing your usual mediocre job of that", "Oh, you've been chasing me for all those years and what did that net you?" and so on and so forth.
Apparently Keen, the-little-profiler-who-could, is the only one with two braincells to rub together - not because she comes across as supersmart as such, just compared to the rest of the agents...
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I think Red's continuous putting down of the FBI and his flattering of "Lizzie" (flattery will get you everywhere!) is all part of his game to get to her and drive a wedge between her and her colleagues as he already did in relation to the husband who she now mistrusts. Red's goal seems to be to have her trust him above the others and then use her though it isn't clear for what yet. Definitely it is not out of generosity or genuine concern for her I do not think.
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Oh...well...all the shows on Monday night should not be thought very hard about....I would generally question that Elizabeth's whole department should actually not be near the main Reddington's team when she is not working on that matter. She is a criminal profiler...she should have other stuff to do (also, likely didn't do a lot of investigating on the Mexican drug dealer stuff and it seemed to me her actual role was being played, she might have been sort of a victim witness advocate while waiting for her board certification to go through but having finished at the academy).
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