The Boondocks

Season 3 Episode 11

Lovely Ebony Brown

0
Aired Sunday 11:30 PM Jul 11, 2010 on Adult Swim
8.6
out of 10
User Rating
27 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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After numerous disastrous dates, Granddad decides to permanently delete his "SpaceBook" page. Shortly thereafter he meets a lovely and seemingly sane woman while jogging in the park. Despite his own reservations and those of his family he decides to give love another shot.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • "It was a relief to meet you, Ms. Brown"

    9.5
    An episode where Rodney Barnes takes the writing reins and McGruder takes the co-writer credit: I'll have to double check my DVD collection, but I'm pretty sure that's a "Boondocks" first. The result is very interesting.



    The funniest part of the episode is the set-up before the theme song. Granddad writes one final post on facebook about how his hopes of finding a good woman thru the social networking site failed miserably. We are then treated to a hilarious montage of all the female drug lords, child abductors, and all manner of other "bat-sh*t-crazy women" granddad has had the misfortune of dating, before granddad commits "Facebook Hari Kari".



    Cue Theme Song.



    Granddad discusses his woman woes with Tom and Ruckus as they get ready to jog. Ruckus tries to convince Granddad that he will never find happiness with a black woman - citing Tom's happiness with his white wife, Sarah, as his example. Tom and Ruckus take off jogging and Granddad stops to tie his shoe. This is when he meets The Lovely Ebony Brown.



    Granddad informs Huey and Riley of his newfound love. The boys race downstairs with a shotgun and a sword. Granddad tries his hardest to convince the boys that this woman is different. Granddad takes Ebony Brown out to dinner at a fancy restaurant. Their valet turns out to be Ruckus ("dammit, Ruckus, how can you work at all of these places at once?") who wants to protect Granddad's integrity and warns him that she probably has a crimnal past, massive debt, or lots of kids. Granddad starts asking Ms. Brown those very questions and she goodnaturedly disproves them and shrugs off the awkwardness behind each question.



    Granddad goes to use the bathroom where a very well written and voice acted scene goes down between him and a bathroom attendant regarding how much to tip a bathroom attendant that ends with Granddad stealing the complimentary mints and the attendant wishing he was allowed to leave the bathroom so he could chase him down.



    Ruckus takes it upon himself to harrass Ms. Brown himself. Both Granddad and Ruckus are left speechless when she laughs at Ruckus' callous attitude toward african-americans and even mentions that his comments make her think.



    Granddad invites Ebony Brown to the house to meet the boys and the neighbors. There, any concerns about her are alleviated when she mentions she works for a non-profit that actually cured some disease called "patterson's disease." Everyone seems impressed but Ruckus, who mentions that no one there has heard of the disease she cured. This is when Sarah comes back from the bathroom and breaks down crying because her grandma had patterson's until it was cured by Ebony Brown's non-profit organization.



    Ebony Brown turns out to be truly flawless. She even sees all the mishaps that happen to Granddad and the boys as we, the casual audience, would - as fun adventures filled with colorful characters. The show does a great job making fun of themselves and their formula for success with this whole entire scene that ends with her wanting to be one of the show's characters. (GRANDDAD: "special guest or occurring?" EBONY BROWN: "regular.") The only thing standing in the way of Granddad and true happiness is Granddad's own insecurites. First believing himself to be too old for her, he buys into Riley's belief that she has a young, ripped boyfriend on the side. He and Ruckus spy on her at a local fitness clinic where they both mistake her workout as sexual exploits. Granddad starts weraing a really big earing in his ear to make himself feel younger, but it backfires and leads to Granddad becoming paranoid that everyone around him is eyeing his woman. He attacks a random stranger to assert his dominance (the weakest looking random stranger he can find in the crowd) Ebony Brown assures Granddad that he has nothing to worry about.



    At home, Granddad waits to hear from Ebony Brown, but Riley once again convinces him that he messed up. In Riley's opinion, Ebony will never come back after watching Granddad fight for her. He lends support to his theory by showing Granddad that she hopped a one way flight to Africa. Granddad follows her to find out why she left him. She tells him she left to provide aid to a community hit with a tsunami. Granddad then looks around to see he is ankle deep in water. Ebony Brown sees the stress she's unintentionally putting on Granddad and breaks up with him. Granddad actually gets his full value out of the experience and puts his facebook page back up with no fabricated information and a request for no bat-sh*t-crazy women.



    A solid episode, but one that lacked the insanity of the rest of the season. Rodney Barnes introduced some interesting concepts into the episode for sure. But by putting a woman who is actually perfect for Granddad into the equation it robs her of having any memorable scenes or lines. I understand what this episode was trying to accomplish. And it did succeed. But that success is also its failure. The dialogue and situations are as funny as ever (especially at the end when Ruckus proclaims his love for Ebony Brown), but the title character of the episode failed to deliver any conflict. So as good as the episode was - and with absolutely no disrespect to the awesome work of Gina Torres - I gotta give this one my 2nd lowest score of the season . 9.5/10. But next week's "Mr. Medicinal" looks guaranteed to put this incredible season back on track.moreless

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