A The Bridge Community
FX (ended 2014)

Brow Beat
The Bridge, FX’s new series about a politically motivated serial killer operating on the U.S.-Mexico border, is all about dualities: North and South, migrant and resident, corrupt and trustworthy, so on and so forth. This pattern of contrasts has even played out in critics’ response to the show: There are those...

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Aug 10, 2013
She is really great
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Aug 10, 2013
It is easy to confuse this for a political thriller on the basis of the first five episodes of the series. Politics is played out and the killer seems to be very aware of the differences in treatment whether the victims of aggression are Mexican or American. He is postulating a lot of sociological conclusions and we are now starting to guess that it's a cop's vision of divide and not a professional assessement. If Sonya, in her "condition" does not seem to be responding to that dimension of the crimes, except as a motive; Marcos understands all too well.
We see him in the interaction with his corrupt superio and with the cartel thug, that while reluctant, they are still part of his environment. At least they are visible and a known factor. On the Stateside, the recent discovery of Gedman's killing of that poor Mexican prostitute a year ago, the tunnel that the Widow discovered, the social worker who "kidnaps" a poor woman trying to escape a dangerous relationship into a kind of religious compound in Texas- all these reveal that corruption and crime are subversive and occult on that side of the border,
So what is Sonya Cross in all that. She is complete purity. And this is the way that Diane Kruger is playing her, without shadows. The fact is that we are used to shadows and indeed, in TV shows as these, we seek this darkness. So we are annoyed when Ms Kruger does not and/or will not share this dimness with us. Yes, we will have to get used to someone like Sonya Cross, but we will be the better for it.
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Aug 10, 2013
Ok, I get what you are saying, though I think you've misinterpreted Linder and his actions with the Mexican underground railroad. I'm pretty sure Linder, despite being a really creepy weirdo, is actually putting himself in danger over and over again in order to save women of domestic abuse, and that dusty farm is a safe house/halfway house for these women to heal and figure out what they are going to do with their lives once they stop living as if the next beating will be there last event on earth. So let's assume Linder is a "good guy".

To you, Sonya represents purity, and I appreciate you pointing out what it is about Kruger's performance that is likely so off-putting to many people. I see there is a power and simplicity in Sonya's worldview that presents a pretty stark contrast to the world around her, but that distance she possesses is also her shortcoming as a detective.

Marco is the uber-relatable everyman who has an acceptable level of foibles and vices and is considered the representation of "normal". He is aware of the ugliness of life, of the horror, graft and corruption all around him, he even occasionally has to get dirty himself, doing the wrong things for the right reasons, but he generally returns himself to the side of right and goodness, at least in his professional life.

So looking at these characters, at all the characters, as if they exist upon a spectrum of light to dark, pure to utterly corrupt, what then is the message the show is attempting to convey to us? Is Marco the median or the moral compass? Is it possible to operate effectively in law enforcement, in the world at large, without sometimes getting dirty by doing the wrong things for the right reasons? If so is there a cost of character that cannot be recovered? What is the worldview being delivered to the audience if the characters that are "good" or "pure" or "innocent" are not "normal", like Sonja or Linder, or are killed off like the group in the desert or the hundreds of girls of Juarez? I think the issues at play run far deeper than politics, they run to the very heart of what we define for ourselves as individuals and a society as moral and ethical, good and bad, pure and corrupt, valuable, salvageable and waste.
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Aug 10, 2013
I think it is too soon to be talking of a world view or a message. If this going the same way as the original Bron, and this seems the case, all the present information is wrong.
there is no such thing as "normal", and I think that you know that. Linder and Sonya are indeed strange in what they have witnessed during their lives. Linder has issues with the way he lost his sister, as we shall soon see and Sonya lost hers tragically, probably through murder.The core of our humanity has always been empathy, to others and the species at large.I am being clinical on purpose, because Sonya and Linder do have empathy to a very high degree, and the fact that they are awkward socially does not diminish in any way any of their humanity.At the end of the day is what do you personally accept as the limits which you define for yourself as your humanity. Linder has had to kill that asshole, as self defence first but as a necessity as well.The Marco /Sonya duo works so well because there is no judgement on either part and there is complete acceptance and thus trust.Maybe this is the message, that empathy and trust is the way we can cope with the vileness of the world when it becomes corrupt at all the different levels of civilization.
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