The Bugs Bunny and Tweety Show

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ABC (ended 2000)

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  • Season 2 Episode 9: Episode 209

  • The uncensored and uncut version of The Last Hungry Cat is available on both theLooney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 3 DVD, and the Looney Tunes Super Stars' Tweety & Sylvester: Feline Fwenzy DVD collection.

  • The Last Hungry Cat was heavily edited pretty much each time it aired on TV. On CBS, the part where Sylvester is shown drinking coffee and smoking lots of cigarettes was cut. The ABC version didn't feature the scene where Sylvester swallows the sleeping pills, and the scene where Granny beats Sylvester up with her broom was shortened.


    The Cartoon Network initially aired this cartoon without the smoking scene, but in recent years it also removed the sleeping pills part.


     

  • The Last Hungry Cat was released theatrically on December 2, 1961. It was directed by Friz Freleng and Hawley Pratt.

  • The scene from Big House Bunny where Sam ends up hanged on a noose has been edited out from most if not all airings on every TV network.

  • Big House Bunny is available, uncensored and uncut, on Looney Tunes Golden Collection: Volume 1, Disc 1 DVD.

  • Big House Bunny was released theatrically on April 22, 1950. It was directed by Friz Freleng, produced by Eddie Selzer and written by Tedd Pierce.

  • When aired on ABC, A Fractured Leghorn was edited; the parts where the cat sucks on the tractor's exhaust pipes was cut, as well as the part where Foghorn plays around with an axe, while also hitting the cat with its blunt side.

  • A Fractured Leghorn is one of the few cartoons featuring Foghorn Leghorn, where Henery Hawk and Barnyard Dawg are completely absent.

  • The cat seen in A Fractured Leghorn appeared in three more Looney Tunes animated shorts: Swallow the Leader (1949), It's Hummer Time (1950), and Early to Bet (1951). All cartoons featuring this nameless black cat were directed by Robert McKimson.

  • A Fractured Leghorn was originally released theatrically on September 16, 1950. It was directed by Robert McKimson and written by Warren Foster.

  • When aired on ABC, Robot Rabbit was censored to remove the two scenes where the robot mistakes a mule and Elmer for rabbits and shoots them.


    On CBS, the cartoon kept the two cuts mentioned above, but also edited out the famous "Wabbit kicked the bucket" scene, and the end of the robot chasing Bugs onto a construction site scene.


    In syndication, when the cartoon aired as part of The Merrie Melodies Show, the scene where Elmer imitates a rabbit is cut, and replaced with a still shot of the mule the robot just blasted.

  • Robot Rabbit was released theatrically on December 12, 1953. It was directed by Friz Freleng and written by Warren Foster.

  • Season 2 Episode 8: Episode 208

  • Satan's Waitin' is one of the few Looney Tunes cartoons where Sylvester dies at the end. Other such cartoons include Back Alley Oproar (1948) and Mouse Mazurka(1949), both also directed by Friz Freleng.

  • When aired on CBS, Satan's Waitin' removed the scenes which showed how Sylvester lost his eighth life, as well as his ninth and final life, thus cutting the true ending of the cartoon.

  • Goof: In Satan's Waitin' Sylvester is shot five times while at the shooting gallery, but he's shown only losing four lives.

  • Satan's Waitin' was released theatrically on August 7, 1954. It was directed by Friz Freleng and produced by Eddie Selzer.

  • Scenes of Bad Ol' Putty Tat can be seen in the 2010 TV movie produced by HBO, You Don't Know Jack, starring Al Pacino as Dr. Jack Kevorkian. The cartoon can be seen when the titular character is watching TV; he erroneously mentions that in this cartoon Sylvester is chasing a frog, rather than Tweety.

  • Bad Ol' Putty Tat is available on the Looney Tunes Golden Collection Volume Two DVD.

  • The scene from Corn on the Cop where the bank robber shoots Daffy in the face was removed from the cartoon's airings on both ABC and the WB.

  • Bad Ol' Putty Tat was originally released theatrically on July 23, 1949. It was directed by Friz Freleng, and written by Tedd Pierce.

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Animation, Comedy, Kids