The Chicago Code

Season 1 Episode 13

Mike Royko's Revenge

2
Aired Monday 9:00 PM May 23, 2011 on FOX
7.1
out of 10
User Rating
81 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
FBI Special Agent Cuyler returns to visit Superintendent Colvin while Wysocki addresses certain family issues that have haunted him for years. The stakes are suddently raised when Wysocki and Colvin are forced to put everything on the line, in their fight against corruption in Chicago.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Final :-(

    9.5
    This is the final episode of a good tv cop show. All the great moments were shown in this last episode. The secret of the death of Vince, the undercover cop brother of Jarek. The lonely side of life of the superintendent and finally the down fall of a very corrupt man. I like the sacrifices the characters of Jarek and Teresa were made to take. Jarek sacrificed a good name to put a corrupt man behind bars and Teresa sacrificed a potential love life to keep the credibility of her office. All these are important if we want to keep our offices clean of corruptions. I guess that's why I like tv shows, we can create a world were the good always wins over evil. I will miss the Chicago Code. The journey was short but good. Thank you Shawn Ryan.moreless
  • A very good finale for a very good show.

    8.0
    The Chicago Code knows how to balance the political and the emotional. It's a tough trick since it's easy to have characters talk through out an entire episode without the viewer connecting to them. Instead the show manages to have a strong lead with trustworthy supporting characters whose side you are immediately on, no questions asked. And though the story leaves somewhat to wonder as to what the show spend the other eleven episodes on, there's no doubt in anyone's mind that Gibbons deserves jail time.

    The story is complicated enough to keep pace and feel the pressure of the case but eventually it is kind of too easy. I'm sure that the story would expand had the show got more episodes to work with but for some reason there's not very much satisfaction in getting Gibbons by the end of the episode. It's what you expect and more importantly what you want, yet it doesn't really work.

    Don't get me wrong, this was a stand out episode but that only allows me to be more critical. Unlike many of it's colleague cop shows, The Chicago Code wants to be taken seriously. It's far out impressive how a pretty standard revenge story about the death of a cop's brother can fit perfectly into catching a high ranked, powerful criminal. The developments and the twists are strong and captivating, much like the ending. Even for a thirteen episode series the finale brings everything to the table and manages to complete every story without too much forced conclusion or out of the blue revelations.

    A very smart writing team indeed.moreless
Jason Clarke

Jason Clarke

Detective Jarek Wysocki

Jennifer Beals

Jennifer Beals

Superintendent of Police Teresa Colvin

Matt Lauria

Matt Lauria

Detective Caleb Evers

Devin Kelley

Devin Kelley

Vonda Wysocki

Todd Williams

Todd Williams

Isaac Joiner

Billy Lush

Billy Lush

Liam Hennessey

Dominic Capon

Dominic Capon

Mack

Guest Star

Kimber Closson

Kimber Closson

Concerned Citizen

Guest Star

Billy Dec

Billy Dec

Veterinarian

Guest Star

Adam Arkin

Adam Arkin

FBI Division Chief Cuyler

Recurring Role

Cynthia Kaye McWilliams

Cynthia Kaye McWilliams

Lilly Beauchamp

Recurring Role

Phillip Edward Van Lear

Phillip Edward Van Lear

Ellis Hicks

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (6)

    • Cuyler: You know there's something about justice being served that always makes me crave a steak.
      Colvin: Well, if you're asking me out to dinner then it would have to be just for dinner.
      Cuyler: Aw, no dessert? Really? Okay, I will stop fooling around if you grant me one date, just one with flowers and candles and Shakespearean sonnets and a lot more wine than this.
      Colvin: You know I can't do that.
      Cuyler: Look, I know that you feel like you have to be the best at what you do, and there are none of us that are good that feel any differently, but you can't let the job be your whole life, Teresa. And things like this don't come along that often.
      Colvin: Well, I know that if I went out on a date then I would probably want to go out on another one and then another one.
      Cuyler: So far, I'm liking the sound of this scenario.
      Colvin: And then at some point, the press would create conflict of interest and a scandal would break. And then everything that I have worked so hard for since the Academy would be taken away from me without a second thought. And they would never hire another woman for this job because they would say the first one couldn't control her hormones with an FBI special agent in charge, even though he was handsome and funny. And thinks like this don't come around all that often.
      Cuyler: (somewhat jokingly) So you want me to quit my job?

    • Wysocki: (about the photo of Killian and Vincent) Where did you get this?
      Gibbons: From what I understand, it came from the personal collection of Mr. Killian.
      Wysocki: What does that mean? What does it say to you?
      Gibbons: It says that Hugh Killian murdered your brother.
      Wysocki: And you get that from some fifteen-year-old photograph? So, the one guy you know could put you away is the same guy who killed my brother. It all seems coincidental.
      Gibbons: I know how it looks. But I believe you're a man that goes with his gut, detective. And the reason that you came all the way down here to find me is because when you look at the photograph something ain't right. Now, I can't prove that, but you can. All I can do is show you where to look. What you do when you find the truth is up to you.

    • Colvin: Special Agent in Charge Cuyler.
      Cuyler: So, to what do I owe the honor?
      Colvin: I have a mid-level mob boss who is ready to flip on a corrupt alderman if I can get him a nice McMansion in Wyoming.
      Cuyler: Wyoming?
      Colvin: He (Killian) likes the mountains.
      Cuyler: What did you tell him?
      Colvin: That I'm not in the relocation business, but I know someone who is.
      Cuyler: And here I was delusional enough to think that the reason behind this request might be more personal than professional.
      Colvin: And here I was thinking you love your work.
      Cuyler: Eight hours a day, yeah. The other sixteen, my imagination runs rampant.
      Colvin: Well, since we're on business hours, how about helping me out?

    • Gibbons: Your days in Chicago are numbered, Teresa.
      Colvin: Whatever the number, it's more than yours.

    • Lilly: You know, I did all of the Alderman's research on you when you were just a candidate for this job.
      Colvin: And?
      Lilly: So I know who you are. You've got nothing. No man, no family, nobody loves you. So you've got to run around making everyone else's lives miserable because you've got nothing in your heart.
      Colvin: I'm sorry you think that.
      Lilly: I know that. Like I know that Ronin Gibbons is a good man and he would never do anything to hurt me. So why on earth would I tell some cold-hearted b***h anything that would ever hurt him. I think we both know that you've got nothing to hold me on so I don't think I'll stick around for any more of your consciousness raising, sister.
      Colvin: If things start getting cold out there, I'm still here if you want to talk.

    • Colvin: I've learned two things about fighting crime in Chicago. One, it's a marathon, not a sprint so you better be ready to go the distance. And two, go for the head that's where the teeth are. Hugh Killian damn well deserves to go down, but I would give him up in a heartbeat to get to Alderman Ronin Gibbons. The late legendary newspaperman, Mike Ryoko, once said that this town was built by great men who demanded that drunkards and harlets be arrested while charging them rent until the cops arrive. Mike would be happy to know that today the cops are going after the landlords.

  • NOTES (3)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • Title: "Mike Royko's Revenge"

      Michael "Mike" Royko (September 19, 1932 – April 29, 1997) was a Chicago newspaper columnist who won the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for commentary. During his thirty year career, he worked for the Chicago Daily News, the Chicago Sun-Times, and the Chicago Tribune, and was a life-long fan of the Chicago Cubs.

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