The Fugitive (1963)

Season 3 Episode 4

Trial by Fire

19
Aired Unknown Oct 05, 1965 on ABC
9.6
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Episode Summary

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Trial by Fire
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Kimble's sister Donna summons him home with a possible break in the case: a letter from James Eckhardt, a former U.S. Army captain who also saw the one-armed man fleeing from the Kimble's house on the night of Helen's murder. Kimble meets with Eckhardt, who agrees to help the fugitive out. Eckhardt's story seems strong enough to clear Kimble. But unknown to either men, another witness comes forward: a convict in prison for drug dealing, who reveals that he used to sell heroin to Eckhart for a Korean War battle wound and that Eckhardt was on his way to see him that night to buy some drugs, which is more than enough for Gerard to discredit Eckhardt's testimony.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    John Durren

    John Durren

    Eddie Bragg

    Guest Star

    Ed Deemer

    Ed Deemer

    Sgt. Rainey

    Guest Star

    Chris Alcaide

    Chris Alcaide

    Lt. Holvak

    Guest Star

    Jacqueline Scott

    Jacqueline Scott

    Donna Taft

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (1)

      • Opening Narration: Occasionally, a fugitive must make contact with reality to escape the loneliness of flight, to preserve his sanity. For Richard Kimble, contact with reality consists of an occasional telephone conversation with his sister. Tonight's call, however, could mean a great deal more.

        Narration: In Stafford, a man has worked through until morning preparing to set in motion the ponderous machinery of the law. In Chicago, another man continues the pursuit begun so long ago.

        Closing Narration: A witness has seen the one-armed man. Richard Kimble has had confirmed what he had almost begun to doubt himself. And a phantom seen by two men can be seen again.

    • NOTES (1)

    • ALLUSIONS (0)

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