The Golden Girls

Season 3 Episode 11

Three on a Couch

0
Aired Unknown Dec 05, 1987 on NBC
8.8
out of 10
User Rating
56 votes
2

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Episode Summary

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Three on a Couch
AIRED:
Constant bickering, causes the girls to seek help from a therapist. This prompts the girls to reminisce about times they didn't get along. The therapist's conclusion, they should not live with one another.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • The girls see a therapist who suggests they no longer live together.

    8.2
    I am not a fan of flashback episodes but I liked seeing how the girls were constantly bickering and at the end all the flashbacks proved that it's all part of being human and that everybody fights and it's part of being an adult and that you have to deal with it. I loved how Sophia didn't want to give her advice in the end but wound up giving it through a Sicily-like story, anyway.moreless
  • Another superb Weiss and Ferro effort

    9.5
    It's too bad Fredric Weiss and Jeffrey Ferro did not write more episodes for this show. Their scathing wit and intelligent storylines are part of the cream of the crop for this show.



    By this time, it was clear that "flashback" episodes were becoming commonplace (and, in fact, somewhat of a staple) for this show. I always find these shows to have a standup "skit-like" feel, and I generally enjoy the results. This episode is no exception. The classic "personals column" flashback is one of the most memorable scenes of the series: "Here's eight dollars, Dorothy. Let's get started." "I'm not Dorothy, she is." "I'll give you four dollars. Let's get started." "How would you like your rear end kicked across the street?!" "Oh, boy, here's the other four dollars!"



    Another classic moment: the Scandinavian word-fest near the halfway point in the episode. "Literally, it's the moment dog doo turns white." Ah, the hilarity of spontaneity.



    The episode involves the girls at each other's throats. They go to a psychiatrist to hopefully tackle the situation. So we listen to four stories, basically looking at the qualities that often bring conflict among the four. More exactly, each flashback is focused on a particular trait of one of the girls. We get a hint of Blanche's selfishness, Rose's idiocy, Dorothy's authoritativeness, and Sophia's motherliness. Qualities we've grown to know and love but often lead to trouble.



    The psychiatrist concludes that the four are incompatible. But I think the writers are of the opinion that they are instead complementary. Dorothy needs a dose of Blanche's vanity and Rose's innocence. Blanche could use some of Dorothy's common sense and Rose's naivete. And Rose can certainly take more grounded advice from intelligently superior Dorothy and Blanche. And to stay in line, all three need the advice of the wise one: Sophia. It's just that four feathers of four different birds sometimes clash.



    My mother always told me that the best conflict comes from the closest relationships. It became clear by Season 3 that the Golden Girls were as close as can be. Yes, they frequently have miffs, but their friendships were strong. The last scene of the episode, in the kitchen, was testament to the foundation this show had made. And leave it to Sophia, as usual, to sum things up and to straighten the girls out.



    What a great episode. Funny and endearing. You can't ask for much more from these girls...or any show, for that matter.moreless

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Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (3)

    • Dorothy says that the ladies have been living together for 5 years, which would mean, Dorothy, Rose and Blanche have been living together since 1983, and Sophia joined them two years later in the Pilot in 1985. Yet in a season five episode Dorothy tells Blanche that she's been putting up with her selfishness for five years. Another inconsistency.

    • Sophia agrees to split a pepperoni pizza with Dorothy, but in "One for the Money," it was established that Sophia only liked homemade pizza.

      In response to above: While Sophia did say she only likes homemade pizza, when challenged, Sophia admits she can adjust.

    • Philip Sterling plays the psychiatrist Dr. Ashley in this episode, but had once before played a psychiatrist on the Golden Girls. Yet, in the episode entitled "End of the Curse" (2-1) his name was to Dr. Barensfeld, and so there is no reference in this episode to Blanche having seen him once before. Many might recognize him from playing a judge on two shows: "L.A. Law" as well as "Sisters".

  • QUOTES (4)

    • Sophia: My name is Sophia Petrillo and my idea of a good psychiatrist is a bartender who pours without a spout.

    • Blanche: I'm 41 years old, I'm 5' 6", I weigh 108 pounds, and my hair is its natural hue.
      Dorothy: Sure, Blanche, yours and Lucy's.

    • Rose: I thought I'd keep you company.
      Dorothy: (studying in bed) I don't want any company.
      Rose: (getting into bed beside Dorothy) Just pretend I'm not here.
      (Blanche enters)
      Blanche: Hey a slumber party, count me in. (gets in beside Dorothy and Rose)
      Dorothy: What's going on here?
      (Sophia enters)
      Sophia: Allright, I want to see six hands above that blanket right now.

    • Psychiatrist: Rose, what do you think of Blanhe saying these things?
      Rose: Well she's a garkonenoken.
      Psychiatrist: Well, what exactly does that mean?
      Rose: Well literally it's the precise moment when dog doo turns white. But in general terms, it refers to the kind of person you don't want to share your hugencoggles with.
      Dorothy: Rose, if you say one more of those stupid words...
      Rose: Oh, blow it out your tubenburbles!
      Dorothy: How dare you?!

  • NOTES (1)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • Sophia makes a reference to Designing Women, another popular show of the eighties.

      Little did she know that within the next decade, The Golden Girls and Designing Women would both be re-aired on Lifetime.

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