The High Chaparral

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NBC (ended 1971)

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8.3
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User Rating
96 votes
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SHOW REVIEWS
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The High Chaparral

Show Summary

High Chaparral was the name given to the ranch owned and operated by the Cannon family in the Arizona Territory during the 1870's. Stubborn, proud Big John Cannon (Leif Erickson) is unceasing in his determination to carve a life in the untamed land. Frequently at odds with Big John is his firebrand of a younger brother Buck (Cameron Mitchell) and John's sensitive son, Billy Blue (Mark Slade). After his first wife's death, Big John marries Victoria (Linda Cristal), daughter of wealthy Mexican Land-owner, Don Sebastian Montoya (Frank Silvera) as a political alliance. Her roguish brother Manolito (Henry Darrow) accompanies her to the Cannon ranch and becomes a permanent member of the household. Sam Butler (Don Collier) is hired as the ranch foreman, while his brother Joe (Bob Hoy) along with Reno (Ted Markland), Pedro (Roberto Contreras), Ira (Jerry Summers), and Vaquero (Rudolfo Acosta) are the hard-working, fun-loving ranch hands. Family differences, the conflicts between the Indians and the Americans, and the ever-present threats from rustlers and renegades all provided materials for the stories in the series. A number of cast changes occurred in the program's last seasons. The character of Blue Cannon was dropped. Ranch hands Ira and Reno left. Added to the cast was Wind (Rudy Ramos), a half-Pawnee youth who became a member of the Cannon bunkhouse.moreless
Don Collier

Don Collier

Sam Butler, Foreman

Cameron Mitchell

Cameron Mitchell

Buck Cannon

Leif Erickson

Leif Erickson

Big John Cannon

Rudy Ramos

Rudy Ramos

Wind (10-09--70)

Mark Slade

Mark Slade

Billy Blue Cannon

Henry Darrow

Henry Darrow

Manolito Montoya

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • one of the best Western TV Series

    10
    If you're considering great western TV series, "The High Chaparral" must be on your list! The idea of this classic show is very precise and realistic. The portrayal of both protagonists and the rogues were concentrated extraordinarily by the entire actors of this show! Additionally, it is packed with great journeys on all episodes which definitely keep you at the edge of your seats! I bought a DVD copy of this at dvdbooth. com . DVD Booth delivered my package just in time. What's more unexpected is the DVDs I received was made of good quality. This High Chaparral boxset is defnitely one of my precious keepsakes!moreless
  • Another classic western ...

    8.0
    An excellent late '60s western, great storylines and acting by the whole cast - be they regulars, guest stars or supporting players.



    The intricate relationships between each of the characters was well played out, while at the same time not detracting from the action elements of each episode. Probably ahead of it's time somewhat in that this show made good use of a strong recurring cast, i.e. the bunkhouse crew led by Sam Butler (portrayed strongly, but in understated manner by the excellent Don Collier), to support the main players.



    Not ensure of David Dortort's reasons behind the concept of the High Chaparral, but one can't help but feel that he was looking to add a bit more depth and build on what he had achieved with the already established and popular Bonanza.



    A fifth season would have been welcome viewing.moreless
  • A Larger Than Life Western with Larger Than Life Characters. This show was awesome

    10
    What to say about a show that affected me so profoundly? The characters, Big John Cannon, Buck Cannon, Billy Blue Cannon, Manolito Montoya, Victoria Montoya Cannon, and all of the ranch hands, bad guys, good guys, and lost souls were REAL people, at least for that one hour. From the very first show I was captivated. I have always loved stories of The Old West, and tales of people struggling to make a new life for themselves, and this show definitely fit into that category. They were human, with all of the faults and problems of all humanity, yet they strove to rise above those faults and achieved more often than not. Big John, the force that drove the show. The ranch was his dream and his passion. Had his first wife lived, he would have shared that passion easily with her. Billy Blue, young, unsure, but striving to become a man. Buck Cannon, Big John's younger brother, willing to live his brother's dream and being the adult confidant that Billy Blue so desperately needed after his mother was killed. These three were the first part of the equation that made the show so wonderful. Manolito Montoya, a devil-may-care young man with a rakish smile and an enormous passion for having fun in life and his sister Victoria Montoya Cannon, Big John's second wife and no wilting flower but joined to John Cannon at her father's wishes, were the next part of this fabulous set of characters. They, and their scheming father, Don Sebastian Montoya, definitely were not the stereotypical Mexican of most Westerns. The ranch hands were also very real, especially the brothers Sam and Joe. The show, unusual for the time it was first shown, treated the Native American cultures with sensitivity, showing that they were not just savages out for blood, but very real people with many of the same desires that the rest of us have. The characters grew and learned from their past experiences, and were not static throughout the four years it aired. This show is one I would eagerly purchase if it were legally available on DVD, and will eagerly watch again if it is re-run in my area. I would recommend it highly to anyone who loves the old west.moreless
  • Great characters and very realistic.

    9.7
    As a child I used to be glued to the TV each time the High Chaparral was broadcast. The characters became friends, I was looking forward to meeting them each week. Billy Blue (Mark Slade) was my favorite and the troublesome relationship with his father was something I could relate to. The series was far more realistic than other westerns in the 60-70's and the characters were three-dimensional.

    They didn't have all the answers and often made mistakes.

    The Mexicans spoke Spanish, and the Indians Apache.

    It's one of the few western series from that period that still appeals to me when I'm watching reruns. It's magic is still there.moreless
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