The Lost World

Season 1 Episode 20

The Chosen One

0
Aired Unknown Apr 22, 2000 on
7.9
out of 10
User Rating
25 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
The Chosen One
AIRED:
Teenage Gideon and his mentor Davos are on a mission to fulfill the boy's destiny of leading his tribe of Moya out of the bondage of the evil Goths. Roxton and Marguerite come upon them, just as Davos is fatally wounded in a Goth attack. Before he dies, Davos charges Roxton with ensuring Gideon and the "Star of Hope" quarterstaff he carries, reach their destination. What they discover is that Gideon has been taken from his parents as a child, raised by monks, and chosen to lead his people from the isolated caves where they have hidden for a generation. The time has come for him to take his rightful place... but he has been betrayed, his mentor murdered. Roxton resolves to escort the boy back to his people. Marguerite reluctantly goes along. The trio meets up with Gideon's brother Lucas and they reach the Moyan elders. Unfortunately, they discover the Goths won't rest until the Moyans and their friends are dead. At the Treehouse, Malone bonds with a woman named Kaya who kisses him passionately. What he doesn't know is that Kaya is the human host to a dying species that needs a human pair in order to reproduce. Kaya's kiss passes the parasitic creature into Malone. As Veronica wrestles with jealousy, she discovers Kaya's hold over Malone may be a deadly one.moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Sunday
No results found.
Monday
No results found.
Tuesday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A young man finds himself burdened with a troubling destiny; a young woman is not what she seems. Marguerite and Roxton as surrogate parents? Ned as a rebellious son? Challenger as a kind father-figure? There is no end to the shifting planes of reality inmoreless

    8.2
    Shoot through me! Kill me. Kill him!



    Gideon starts out as arrogant, chauvinistic, and reckless to the extreme. His challenge to the apemen endangers everyone’s lives, yet he remains oblivious when Marguerite rips a strip off him. He is quite proud of his role as the Chosen One, but completely cowed by the responsibility of being the Star of Hope, leader of his people. Easily confused by his crafty brother, he blows his brief stab at leadership then, torn by guilt and self-doubt, totally abdicates his responsibility. It seems that his answer to every problem is to die. John holds him accountable for his defeatist attitude. “Right now (dying) is easier than living… There’s a big difference between honour and guilt.” In the end Gideon is sadder but wiser; unfortunately he is still filled with self-doubt. I’m not sure I agree with Marguerite’s assessment “The boy’s done us proud.” I suspect he has a long way to go to ever hold a candle to Lord Roxton.



    Well, then we have a problem.



    Amazing how one little parasite can change the whole dynamic of a group. There are more threats –both overt and unvoiced- than in any other episode of The Lost World. Kaya responds to Veronica’s suspicious question with the comment above, complete with a level stare and a meaningful silence. When Summerlee takes her pulse, Ned threatens him “Leave her alone.” When Summerlee finds Ned in Kaya’s embrace, he holds out the gun and says, in no uncertain terms “Now!” The next day Summerlee gives Ned a lecture on appropriate behaviour for a gentleman only to have Malone turn on him with a straight razor and tell him to ‘Back off.’ In the final confrontation at the pool, Veronica threatens both Kaya and Ned.



    This episode is another example of the torture that the writers put Ned and Veronica through. They start out with a conversation filled with sexual innuendo, then parade his well-built torso throughout the episode, Ned even vows that he loves her. Of course it is another woman he shares this with. When he tries to tell Veronica he loves her at the end “Veronica, since the day I met you…” she cuts him off still feeling betrayed by his commitment to the procreation of a dying species. “Don’t, not now.” Sigh.



    If you’d have let them pass they wouldn’t have been our enemies.



    This scene really annoys me. The fight with the apemen could quite easily have been played straight up, but for whatever reason it was played for laughs. The actor who played the apeman overacted (can you believe that) when Gideon first attacked him. Then Roxton pulls the old “toss your rifle at the enemy” trick (grrr). And (though unintentional) here and in the scene where they are smoked out of the caves, when Roxton shouts ‘Gideon.’ I hear “Giddy-up” which makes it seem even sillier. Anyway I find the slapstick humour robs Marguerite’s fiery anger of its power. Roxton is almost laughing at her (as he returns her hat) and Gideon is patronizing her. I just find it rankles me.



    Here in the jungle we have a rule.



    Who’d have thunk it? As we near the end of Season 1, Marguerite has morphed from high society madam soaking in her bubble bath to a denizen of the jungle. She goes boar-hunting with Roxton, she knows the ‘rules of the jungle’ and she’s developed a ‘great sense of direction.’ What’s more she’s turned into a deadly fighter, killing more enemies in this episode than at any other time in the series. She can take a punch from an apeman and a Goth and is able to hold off an angry horde with a machete and a spear. Formidable.



    How little you know me.



    This episode demonstrates both how little Roxton and Marguerite know each other and yet how well they understand each other. Marguerite is suspicious of Roxton’s behaviour from the beginning and quizzes him relentlessly. Just like in Resurrection, the quieter and more serious John is, the more curious and chatty Marguerite becomes. At times, she is remarkably heavy-handed “Imagine thinking your brother was dead then finding out he wasn’t. I wonder what that feels like.” At others, remarkable intuitive “Come on, admit it, that kid reminds you of someone.” Then later “He couldn’t – not again.” seeing so clearly that Roxton’s mute refusal to shoot Lucas was because he was haunted by the vision of his dead brother.

    They also have developed a silent language. No longer does someone have to clap a hand over Marguerite’s mouth when there are apemen in the underbrush. Then when he directs her and Gideon to turn back she soundlessly obeys. When he tells her to go with the others, he’ll follow later, she’s gone without a protest. When he needs a minute to check for an escape, he assumes Marguerite will gain that for him and she does. She takes risks and abuse to protect Roxton in the fight with the Goths and he does the same for her.

    But still there are moments of discord. At the beginning they are at complete odds about whether they need to accompany Gideon on his quest. There is an odd tone when she asks him “Just one question, who made you their father?” And at the end, it seemed that Roxton’s airy “I wouldn’t have thought there was a motherly bone in your body.” struck a nerve in the woman of fire and steel.



    Other stuff



    You are the Chosen One. All your life you have been trained to unite and lead the Moya out of the darkness and back into the light.

    Sounds a little like Bochra telling Marguerite “All your life you’ve been driven by something you don’t understand… It is your destiny to save us.”



    Look, people betray you; that’s the way life is. It happens all the time. You don’t kill yourself over it.

    This certainly speaks volumes about Marguerite’s world-view.



    But I love her. I know.

    Is this the only time Ned says that he loves Veronica?



    Personally I always find the surprise element a little unsettling - especially if there is one too many surprises.

    Whoever would have thought Challenger could be so caring and insightful? Just when I figured he must be possessed, he comes out with a more typical ‘Challenger meets a beautiful woman’ line - “Oh Veronica, (Kaya’s) just happy to be among friends again.” Yeah, right, George.





    No episode that has Summerlee speak as the voice of turn-of-the-century British morality or where Roxton and Marguerite are fighting and feuding their way to triumph can ever go far wrong in my estimation. I like this one.

    moreless

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

More
Less