The Parent 'Hood (1995)

Season 2 Episode 16

I'm O'Tay, You're O-Tay

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Aired Wednesday 8:00 PM Feb 21, 1996 on The WB
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Episode Summary

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I'm O'Tay, You're O-Tay
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In observance of Black History Month, Nicholas must choose a famous African-American to portray at a school assembly. Nicholas shocks his family when he tells them he wants to be Buckwheat. Robert suggests to Nicholas that he choose an African-American figure with a more positive image. However, Nicholas is adamant about his choice so Robert decides to lend his son support. At the assembly, Nicholas comes out dressed in Buckwheat garb and speaks in the almost unintelligible style, which was Buckwheat's trademark. However, midway through his speech, Nicholas takes off his Buckwheat wig to explain that during Buckwheat's era, black actors had to portray stereotypical characters if they wanted to be in movies at all, and that we should honor these black film pioneers for making it easier for future generations of African-American actors. Meanwhile, Cece wants to be more like her big sister Zaria by emulating her.moreless

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    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (2)

      • Robert: (to Nicholas) Things are different now because you got programs like The Cosby Show.
        Wendell: And that show ain't even real.
        Robert: What are you talking about? There aren't any black doctors and lawyers?
        Wendell: No, I'm saying one man can't own all them sweaters.

      • Robert: If you're talking jazz, you got to be the Duke.
        Wendell: John Wayne didn't play jazz, man.

    • NOTES (3)

      • At one point, Michael chants a snippet of the theme from Sister, Sister, insinuating that Zaria and Cece look like twins. Sister, Sister was the show that preceded The Parent 'Hood.

      • Buckwheat is a character from The Lil' Rascals. Although the character represented blacks in a stereotypical image, he is one of the popular characters from the series.

      • At the end of this episode, there is a voice-over provided by Robert Townsend dedicating this episode to the famous African-American actors whose talents were never acknowledge and appreciated in the past.

    • ALLUSIONS (0)

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