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Comedian Drew Carey to take over spot vacated by game-show legend Bob Barker.
Jul 24, 2007
Carey to spin Price is Right

The price was right for Drew Carey. The comedian has been named the new host of the long-running game show The Price is Right, ending months of speculation of who would take over the post.

Carey will have some big shoes to fill as he takes over for one of the most famous game-show hosts in show business, Bob Barker. Barker announced his retirement in October of last year and wrapped up his 35-year run as host last month.

The rotund comedian was a late entry into the race for the job, only recently having his name thrown into the hat once CBS got serious about finding a successor. Carey was rumored to be up against several others for the highly coveted job, including George Hamilton, Entertainment Tonight host Mark Steines, veteran game-show host Todd Newton, and Rosie O'Donnell.

Hosting the game show shouldn’t be too much of ...

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New names get thrown into race for Price is Right host, including Rosie O'Donnell and Drew Carey.
Jun 22, 2007
Barker successor hot topic in Hollywood

The Bob Barker-era of The Price is Right just came to an end, as the silver-haired TV personality hosted the daytime game show for the last time.

Barker may be leaving the show after 35 years with the microphone, but the show must, and will, go on. Though it seems unimaginable that anyone can fill Barker's shoes, someone must. The question is, "Who?"

A few names have been rumored to take over, including the very tan George Hamilton, Entertainment Tonight cohost Mark Steines, and Vegas stage show Price is Right host Todd Newton. But since Bob's departure, two new names have entered the rumor mill.

Rosie O'Donnell, a recent emigrant of The View, has reportedly expressed great interest in taking over the hosting duties for the show and said she was meeting with show's producers this week, says the Associated Press. O'Donnell even got the ...

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The time is right for The Price Is Right man to make his exit from TV.
Oct 31, 2006
Bob Barker announces retirement

In June, The Price Is Right host Bob Barker will tell someone to "come on down" for the last time. Barker today announced he will retire from TV.

"I will be 83 years old on December 12, and I've decided to retire while I'm still young," he joked with the Associated Press

Barker has been host of The Price Is Right for 35 years and has been on TV for another 15 years on top of that. He says he has been thinking about retirement for many years, but he was having too much fun to stop.

"I've gone on and on and on to this ancient age because I've enjoyed it," he said. "I've thoroughly enjoyed it and I'm going to miss it."

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Game show icon Bob Barker tapes his last The Price is Right today.
Jun 06, 2007
Bob Barker takes bids for last time

One of the most revered game show hosts of all time is making his last appearance today, as Bob Barker taped his final episode as host of The Price is Right in Los Angeles.

His retirement from show business has attracted several die-hard fans, reports the Associated Press. Dozens of people have been camped out in front of the studio where the show is filmed in hopes of being witness to the legend's final appearance.

"I'd rather win a couch from Bob Barker than a million dollars from Howie Mandel (host of Deal or No Deal," one fan told the AP. "[Barker is] part of American culture."

The 83-year-old began hosting The Price is Right in 1972 and has done so ever since, making the show the longest-running game show in daytime history. Barker first appeared on television as host of Truth or Consequences in 1956 and made ...

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Jun 28, 2013
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CBS has yet to name Bob Barker's successor.
Apr 16, 2007
Trio remaining in Price line

Entertainment Tonight cohost Mark Steines, actor George Hamilton, and Las Vegas' The Price Is Right stage show host Todd Newton are still in the running to succeed Bob Barker as host of CBS' venerable game show The Price Is Right.

It is understood that the options on most of the candidates who auditioned for the job expired Friday.

Sources indicated that the options on Steines, Hamilton, and Newton have been picked up. Representatives for CBS and Price producer FremantleMedia North America declined comment.

CBS might hold off on announcing Barker's successor until its two-night prime time send-off to the 50-year showbiz veteran on May 16 and 17. CBS' fall 2007 upfront presentation is scheduled for May 16.

Barker will tape his last Price show in June, when he will retire after 35 years on the show.

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Prime-time Price is Right, James Woods' legal drama returning with four episodes apiece in late April.
Mar 24, 2008
CBS adds more Price, Shark

American television viewers, get ready for more Plinko during dinnertime. CBS is telling The Price is Right to come on down for four more prime-time episodes beginning in late April.

The evening edition of the popular daytime game show, dubbed The Price is Right Million Dollar Spectacular, was thrust into the later hours as an experiment and a life jacket during the writers' strike. The gamble paid off, as the prime-time edition drew in impressive ratings in its Friday time slot.

The four new episodes will leave the barren wasteland that is Friday night and battle it out with the big boys on hump day. CBS is moving the show to Wednesday nights at 8 p.m. beginning April 30.

The Price is Right, which helped turn Bob Barker into a household name, as he did for the show, is now hosted by comedian Drew Carey.

CBS also completed some ...

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old ghosts
Jan 16, 2014
News Briefs: The Next Season of American Horror Story Will Be Set in the Year...
Plus: The CW gets into the miniseries thing, Benjamin Bratt will hunt Jack Bauer, and HIMYM pisses people off.
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The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Jul 01, 2012
FTW vs. WTF: The TV Week in Review (July 1)
On our list this week: News network blunders, Louie, SYTYCD, True Blood, American Ninja Warrior, and more.
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Episode 117 Season 42
Season 42, Episode 117
Aired
3.17.2014
Episode 116 Season 42
Season 42, Episode 116
Aired
3.14.2014
Episode 115 Season 42
Season 42, Episode 115
Aired
3.13.2014
Episode 114 Season 42
Season 42, Episode 114
Aired
3.12.2014
Episode 113 Season 42
Season 42, Episode 113
Aired
3.11.2014
Host (seasons 36-present)
Announcer (seasons 39-present)
Model (seasons 31-present)
Model (seasons 33-present)
Model (seasons 36-present)

The Price Is Right has long been a staple of daytime and nighttime television. It has seen five incarnations: the 1956-1965 daytime version hosted by Bill Cullen on NBC and ABC, the 1972-1980 nighttime version hosted by Dennis James and Bob Barker, the 1985 nighttime version hosted by Tom Kennedy, the 1994-1995 nighttime version hosted by Doug Davidson, and the current daytime version hosted by Barker and Drew Carey. This guide covers the current daytime version. The object of The Price Is Right is to correctly guess the retail prices of items, without going over, to either win the items themselves or other prizes. At the beginning of each show, the announcer calls out the names of four contestants, imploring each to "come on down!" A prize is announced for which each contestant (one at a time) makes a bid (called the One Bid). After the host announces the actual retail price, the contestant who bid closest without going over is invited on stage to play a pricing game for a larger prize. If a contestant's bid is exactly correct, he/she wins a $500 bonus (on the Armed Forces and $1,000,000 Spectacular Specials, the bonus for an exact bid is $1000). Frequently, during Barker's tenure as host, an animal would be brought out on stage by one of the models during the One Bid prize plugs. Barker would then comment that the pet was available for adoption at an area animal shelter. He also encouraged viewers to visit their local humane society. Pricing game prizes often include cars, trips, rooms of furniture, cash, and various other items. Furs were also given away during the early years, but this practice was dropped per Barker's wishes due to his involvement with animal-rights issues. The episodes that offer furs as prizes will likely never be seen again as Barker continues to fight against their re-airing. There were over 100 total individual pricing games with 72 in the current rotation. Some games involved pricing grocery or small, everyday items. Others involved chance, deduction, skill and/or patience. Many games quickly became very popular. Contestants chomp at the bit to play such entries as Plinko, Ten Chances, Cliff Hangers, Any Number, Grocery Game, Range Game, Race Game, and many others. While each of the pricing games uses only one player, there was one game (known by fans as Bullseye 2) which used two players. This game, which was retired during the first season, had the players alternating bids on a car or boat, and the first to guess the price exactly won. The second contestant was determined by immediately playing another One Bid. Some pricing games have been retired. The reasons include frequent mechanical malfunctions, complicated rules, low odds of winning, and negative responses from viewers. Pictures, audio files, and videos of most of the retired pricing games can be seen on various fan pages on the World Wide Web. After each pricing game is played (except for the final game of the day), one more contestant is called from the audience to "come on down," and another One Bid item is shown for another chance to play a pricing game. Until the fourth season, the two contestants with the highest winnings after all three pricing games had been played went to the Showcase round. Two showcases (prize packages worth several thousand dollars) are shown, one at a time. After the first showcase is revealed, the top winning contestant has the choice to bid on the showcase or pass it to his/her opponent and force him/her to bid. The contestant coming closest to the actual retail price of his/her own showcase without going over wins their showcase. Originally, the contestant could win only his/her showcase. Early in the show's run, a stipulation was added stating that if a contestant's bid came within $100 of his/her showcase's actual retail price, they'd win everything in both showcases. In 1998, the stipulation was modified, and, now, winning contestants who are $250 or less away from the actual retail price of their showcase win both showcases. For the week of November 3-7, 1975 the show expanded from 30 to 60 minutes, following a successful week of experimental hour-long shows the week of September 8-12. A new round called the Showcase Showdown was added. After three contestants have played their pricing games, each has the chance to spin a large wheel called "The Big Wheel." The order of spinning is determined by each contestant's winnings with the player having won the least going first and the player having won the most going last. The Big Wheel contains 20 spaces with numbers in increments of five cents (not in order). Each contestant gets up to two spins in an attempt to get as close to $1.00 without going over. If he/she does not have $1.00 after the first spin, the contestant can choose to spin again to get closer to $1.00 or stop at their current score with the hope that the other contestants will either score lower or go over $1.00. Getting $1.00 exactly earns the contestant a $1000 bonus. Going over $1.00 automatically disqualifies the contestant from going any further. A one-spin spin-off is held if there is a tie between two or all three contestants. If the first two contestants go over $1.00, the third player automatically advances to the Showcase but is still entitled to one spin. After the first Showcase Showdown of each show, three more pricing games are played, followed by the second Showcase Showdown. When the Showcase Showdown was first introduced, during the experimental hour-long week, the wheel spun sideways, and there was no $1000 bonus. When the hour-long show became permanent on November 3, 1975, the $1000 bonus was added, and the current wheel debuted. Beginning in June, 1978, contestants scoring $1.00 were now allowed to spin again in an attempt to win an additional $5000 for hitting one of the green sections above or below the $1.00 space (five and 15 cents) or $10,000 for hitting the $1.00 space. During the prime time specials that first aired in 2002, contestants that hit $1.00 during the bonus spin win $100,000. During the $1,000,000 Spectacular specials airing in 2003, this bonus was increased to one million dollars. The winners of each Showcase Showdown (two per show) advance to the Showcase round. Numerous other changes have taken place through the years, and several prime time specials have aired. The Price Is Right's 5000th episode aired in March, 1998 at which time the studio at CBS's Television City where the show is shot was renamed the Bob Barker Studio. Also, the set and some of the pricing game boards went through numerous minor changes due to inflation or to give it a modern look. The bloopers that have occurred on The Price is Right are among the most celebrated in television history. In early 1976, a woman called to Contestant's Row was in the ladies' room. Her husband had to leave the studio to tell her she'd been called. At the beginning of an episode early in the sixth season, a woman's tube top slipped down as she was running toward Contestant's Row. Also during that season, a woman fainted when she learned she won her showcase ($11,000 in prizes). Other bloopers include cars with malfunctioning brakes and other prizes which give way at the wrong time. Usually, one of the models is often a victim of these unfortunate mishaps (such as Janice Pennington and Rachel Reynolds hitting the wall with the car they are revealing for the Lucky $even pricing game). Many pricing games have malfunctioned at one time or another. Many contestants spinning the Big Wheel spin it so hard that they fall to the floor. There have been a fair share of contestants who claim to or actually don't understand how to play a given game. The most notable is the Check Game (where the contestant writes in an amount that when added to the actual retail price of a prize must total between $5000 and $6000. In addition, one game was victimized by a cheater on the April 4, 2005 playing of Flip Flop (where a contestant is presented a string of two sets of two numbers, representing an incorrect price, and must correct one or both sets to win a prize). The contestant, after receiving input from the audience, pressed the reveal button without making any changes. Barker awarded the contestant the prize anyway, although many fans believe the player should have been disqualified. Some contestants eventually became celebrities - Vanna White in particular. She was called to "come on down" in June, 1980, but did not get out of Contestant's Row. Other future stars include Rick Schroeder and Linda Cardellini. Main Title Theme Song "The Price Is Right Theme" by Edd Kalehoff CBS Broadcast History September 4, 1972 - March 23, 1973 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM March 26, 1973 - August 15, 1975 .... Monday - Friday at 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM August 15, 1975 - November 28, 1975 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM November 3, 1975 - March 25, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:00 AM 11:00 AM March 28, 1977 - November 4, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30AM - 11:30 AM November 7, 1977 - December 16, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM December 19, 1977 - April 20, 1979 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM April 23, 1979 -present .... Monday - Friday at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Emmy Awards Nominations Outstanding Host in a Game Show or Audience Participation Show 1975 - Bob Barker Outstanding Game Show Host 1979 - Bob Barker 1982 - Bob Barker (winner) 1985 - Bob Barker 1986 - Bob Barker 1987 - Bob Barker (winner) 1990 - Bob Barker (winner) 1991 - Bob Barker (winner) 1992 - Bob Barker (winner) 1993 - Bob Barker 1994 - Bob Barker (winner) 1995 - Bob Barker (winner) 1996 - Bob Barker (winner) 2000 - Bob Barker (winner) 2002 - Bob Barker (winner) 2003 - Bob Barker 2004 - Bob Barker (winner) 2005 - Bob Barker 2007 - Bob Barker (winner) Outstanding Game Show Host/Hostess 1984 - Bob Barker (winner) 1988 - Bob Barker (winner) Outstanding Game Show 1976 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 (winner) 1989 1990 1992 1993 1994 1995 Outstanding Game/Audience Participation Show 2002 2003 2004 (winner) 2005 2007 (winner) 2008 Outstanding Technical Direction/Camera/Video for a Miniseries or a Special 1997 - The Price Is Right 25th Anniversary Primetime Special

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