The Pulitzer Prize Playhouse

Season 1 Episode 14

Portrait of a President

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Aired Friday 9:00 PM Jan 05, 1951 on ABC
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Portrait of a President
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A historical look at Andrew Jackson and his launch on the campaign that made him seventh U.S. President of the United States of America.

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    • TRIVIA (1)

      • Jackson's two landslide elections in the face of some of the most savage mud-slinging in U. S. politics; his lucky solution of the four-year Government crisis precipitated by his defense of the notorious black-eyed Peggy Eaton; his strong-armed solution to the problem of South Carolina's attempted secession; collection of a long-outstanding debt of 25 million francs from France by the simple device of threatening to dispatch warships; his ungloved fight to overthrow the Bank of the United States; his support of Protégé Sam Houston in the fight to annex Texas.

        Retiring as the only President ever to leave office more popular than when he came in, Old Hickory spent his last eight years trying vainly to pay off the fancy debts piled up by his adopted son Andrew Jr. (one of eleven or more raised and educated by the Jacksons). On his deathbed, calling for his spectacles in an effort to make out the stricken faces around him, the old man whispered staunchly: "I hope and trust to meet you all in Heaven, both white and black." But he gave no sign that he repented of having said, not long before, that he only regretted he had not been able to shoot Henry Clay and hang John C. Calhoun.

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    • NOTES (1)

      • The 1938 Pulitzer Prize winner "Andrew Jackson: Portrait of a President" was written by Marquis James, it took him seven years to complete.

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