The Ray Bradbury Theater

Season 5 Episode 7

And the Moon be Still as Bright

0
Aired Unknown Oct 19, 1990 on USA

Trivia

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  • Trivia

  • Quotes

    • Spender: I smell death, Captain.
      Wilder: What makes you so sure, Spender?
      Spender: Just the wind. Only the wind.

    • Cheroke: A whole people wiped out. Insane.
      Spender: Right, Cheroke. Insane. Like saying that mumps killed the Greeks. Or that the noble Romans died of athlete's foot. An entire race, dies. Not with dignity and majesty, but from a child's dose of chicken pox. A little gift from Earth.

    • Wilder: Spender, this, this expedition isn't going to ruin Mars. I'll make sure of that.
      Spender: Well, we humans have a talent for ruining big, beautiful things. The only reason we didn't put a hot dog stand on the Moon was because it's a little out of the way. Make a good commercial proposition.

    • Spender: I talked to the Martian.
      Cheroke: You understood him?
      Spender: I told you, I learned their language.
      Cheroke: What did he say?
      Spender: He said, "Give me your boots." So I gave him my boots. And he said, "Give me your uniform." I gave him my uniform. "Give me your gun," he said. I gave him my gun. And then he said, "Come with me. See what happens." And I followed him back to camp. He's here. Now.
      Cramer: I don't see any Martian.
      Spender: Sorry. (shoots his teammates dead)

    • Spender: And you won't let me stay here without trouble, neither, will you?
      Wilder: No.
      Spender: Then I'll have to kill you all.
      Wilder: You're an optimist. We've got you surrounded.
      Spender: But I have a reason to fight. That makes me a better killer.

  • Notes

    • Filmed at the Lougheed Mansion in Calgary, Alberta.

    • This episode is based on the short story "And The Moon Be Still As Bright" by Ray Bradbury. This story was first published in Thrilling Wonder Stories (June, 1948).

  • Allusions

    • Title:
      Referencing Byron's poem, "So, we'll go no more a roving." Penned in 1817, it was later published in 1830 in Letters and Journals of Lord Byron.

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