The Rogues

Follow
NBC (ended 1965)

USER EDITOR

orswel

User Score: 595

6.9
out of 10
User Rating
20 votes
3

SHOW REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

The Rogues

Show Summary

This was a series about a family of confidence tricksters whose main purpose was to take things from the extremely wealthy, mostly the ones who stopped at nothing in making their fortunes. The main members of the family were all cousins and included an Englishman (David Niven), a Frenchman (Charles Boyer) and an American (Gig Young). They would each generally take the lead role in an episode and occasionally the others would have small parts to add to the other's story. Assisting the lead actor each week was Robert Coote's character, the only real constant throughout the series. The music was done by Nelson Riddle who also did the music for Batman. This is only noted because many musical cues seem similar between the two series. Near the end of the series, a new American cousin was introduced and was played by Larry Hagman. Since the series wasn't picked up for another season, Larry was free to move onto I Dream of Jeannie, which started the following season.
First air date: September 13, 1964 Last air date: April 18, 1965 Original air time: Sunday 10:00:00 pm (Eastern)moreless
Gladys Cooper

Gladys Cooper

Margaret St. Clair

Charles Boyer

Charles Boyer

Marcel St. Clair, the French cousin

David Niven

David Niven

Alexander 'Alec' Fleming, the English cousin

Gig Young

Gig Young

Tony Fleming, the American cousin

Robert Coote

Robert Coote

Timothy St. Clair, "Timmy"

Wednesday
No results found.
Thursday
No results found.
Friday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Note to Bichlmaier: The Rogues IS available on DVD -

    10
    Bichlmaier: No need to dream. This series IS on DVD. There are (at least) 2 DVDs, each providing 10 episodes. I don't know who produces and markets them, but you can find them by doing a search on "the rogues tv series" at Amazon. The Amazon price is about $15 each for new; but I intend to order both DVDs and watch regularly for years to come. This series made such an impression on me as a child that the Rogues' lifestyle of clever cons and trusted partners has, alas, made my life seem--no matter how good it gets--unfulfilling. Either my life is that grey, or this series was really that good.



    Michael

    Torontomoreless
  • A comedy-thriller series about con-artists which unfortunately proved, in the long run, to be itself something of a con-trick - on the viewers.

    7.5
    This show is ultimately a rather sad memory - it began so well, but fell into an irreversible decline before the half-way mark; its last episodes were very poor. It was advertised as starring David Niven, Charles Boyer and Gig Young, but really it only starred the latter two. Niven, the biggest and busiest star name, was the chief reason most people tuned in, probably, but he only starred inthree of the thirty episodes. Three out of thirty - outrageous! (He had bit parts in another five.) There was also less of Boyer than there was of Young, the least famous of the leads. He was quite good in the series, but, still, one felt let down. Eventually, the show fell so far behind schedule that even Young had to quit to do a movie, and Larry Hagman was called in for the last two shows. Who was responsible for the way the show declined week after week, from such a bright start? Might it have been executive producer Thomas McDermott, whom some blame for the collapse of Four Star Productions, the company which made the show?moreless
  • The adventures of a band of confidence men (and woman) with class, panache, and various nationalities.

    8.0
    I was a pre-teen when this show came and went, but I loved it. Instead of the "Facts of Life" on DVD, I wish I could get "The Rogues" instead. I'm amazed I've thought about this show after all these years, but it was fun. My parents liked the actors on the program, legends all. It sported none less than Dame Gladys Cooper, quite the grand dame, as well as David Niven, the dashing, debonaire bon vivant everyone wanted to love. Charles Boyer was no slouch, either. I can picture these actors like it was yesterday. The scripts were frothy and fun, no one took anything too seriously, and it was enjoyable to watch. I doubt anyone under the age of 40 will recall this show, but I keep hoping that, one day, it'll make a DVD. I can dream!moreless

No one has discussed The Rogues yet. Start a conversation!

More
Less