The Simpsons

Season 14 Episode 22

Moe Baby Blues

0
Aired Sunday 8:00 PM May 18, 2003 on FOX
8.3
out of 10
User Rating
116 votes
9

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Moe Baby Blues
AIRED:
After Moe inadvertently saves Maggie's life, the two begin to develop a bond, to the annoyance of Homer and Marge.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • The fourteenth season ends with Moe developing a close relationship with the youngest member of the Simpson family.

    10
    A truly excellent way to end the season. "Moe Baby Blues" is one of the greatest episodes not just of season number fourteen, but of the series period. There is not a single negative thing to say about this episode. The scene of Moe telling Maggie the stories of the first two "Godfather" movies was brilliant. Speaking of brilliant I just loved this episode's use of the classic Queen song "You're My Best Friend". An all time classic episode of "The Simpsons". See it with your best friend!moreless
  • A series classic in the most surprising place.

    10
    Okay, "Moe Baby Blues" is one of the best (and certainly the funniest) episode of recent seasons.



    It starts out kind of average with the Simpson family visiting the Botanical Gardens. It was funny to see Homer getting chomped on by the Venus Flytrap but hey, most episodes have a funny moment like that.



    Then the spotlight shifts to Moe. Moe is upset that all of his customers/only friends are at the Botanical Gardens. His line is classic, "I've been replaced by a cooler?" So he decides to go down there with everybody else.



    From that point on, the episode is consistantly hilarious. Moe gets poked down the hill by Chief Wiggum because he is "desperate for human contact." So, he decides to commit suicide (which is sadly kind of funny). Then, Maggie lands in his hands and the two begin to bond.



    I can't think of a single moment of the episode that is the funniest, because it's all hilarious. 10/10 all the way!moreless
  • Moe develops a lose relationship with Maggie.

    9.5
    This was just a wonderful way to end a season that I feel was amazing, and right up there with seasons 4-9. This was just a heart-warming yet funny story, and it was nice to see Moe finally care about something very much. This episode offered some really funny jokes like the plant cutting one, Moe being kicked out of the plant exhibit, and the Godfather parody at the end. This was just a great off to the season, and IMO this really showed us just how this season went. I think this was a very successful season with far more highlights than lowlights.moreless
  • Highlight of the new seasons.

    10
    This is one of the best episodes if not THE best episode after season 10. This one right here shows that the writers still have some juice left. To me, i consider it to be in my top 10 list of wonderful simpsons episodes, and definately, DEFINATELY reminds me of the golden era. It's just great in so many ways, not a single joke fell flat, awesome plot, and surprisingly touching moments. Just plain amazing. Seriously, after I watched that episode for the first time, my faith in the show was finally restored! If I could give this higher than a 10 I would. Really good episode that's funny and sweet at the same time. I suggest checking it out, it's worth watching millions of times.moreless
  • What a way to end the season... The Simpsons end it in style once again. Very good, funny, and touching episode...

    9.9
    Moe is especially lonely and contemplates suicide. While standing on the side of bridge, about to jump, he accidentally catches Maggie – who was thrown from the Simpsons' car in a traffic accident. The little baby immediately takes a liking to him.



    The Simpsons are pleased, and they offer Moe the opportunity to babysit their youngest. Moe has a chance to explore his softer side with Maggie, but once Homer and Marge get sick of his being around all the time, they forbid Moe from babysitting anymore. When Moe then saves the baby a second time, Homer promises Moe that he'll bring Maggie by the bar more often.moreless
Julie Kavner

Julie Kavner

Marge Simpson, Patty Bouvier, and Selma Bouvier

Harry Shearer

Harry Shearer

Mr. Burns, Ned Flanders, Principal Skinner, Waylon Smithers, Kent Brockman, and others

Dan Castellaneta

Dan Castellaneta

Homer Simpson, Grampa Simpson, Barney Gumble, Krusty the Clown, Groundskeeper Willie, and others

Nancy Cartwright

Nancy Cartwright

Bart Simpson, Nelson Muntz, Ralph Wiggum, Todd Flanders, and others

Yeardley Smith

Yeardley Smith

Lisa Simpson

Hank Azaria

Hank Azaria

Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, Moe Szyslak, Chief Wiggum, Comic Book Guy, Lou, and others

Joe Mantegna

Joe Mantegna

Fat Tony

Recurring Role

Karl Wiedergott

Karl Wiedergott

Additional Voices

Recurring Role

Tress MacNeille

Tress MacNeille

Agnes Skinner, Brandine Del Roy, Dolph and others

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (5)

    • Referencing the Twelve Apostles in Victoria, Australia, Homer states that there were Seven Apostles, but Marge later replies and says there were twelve. A matter of fact, as of 2013 there are only seven apostles left along the coastline, as the other five have gradually been eroded away.

    • As the Simpsons are entering the arboretum, one of the sculpted bushes they pass is "Binky", a character from Matt Groening's comic "Life in Hell." The other pair of bushes are Kang and Kodos, The Simpsons' resident space aliens.

    • The song played when Moe is spending time with Maggie (and over the pictures of Homer and the ham) is "You're My Best Friend" by Queen.

    • Gil is seen with white hair

    • When Marge found Maggie missing, she was bringing her a glass bottle (it shatters when she drops it).

  • QUOTES (25)

  • NOTES (11)

    • This episode was nominated for the 2004 WGA Award (TV) for Animation.

    • By tracking Marge's fingers when she calls Moe's tavern, his number is 939-15979. That's the 5th number of the tavern in the show- the last were 636-5551239 (season 2), 636-5556264 (season 3), 636-5553543 (season 5) and 636-76484377 (season 7). It seems like he changes the number because of Bart's prank phone calls.

    • At the botanical gardens, you can see a bush shaped like Binky, the rabbit from Matt Groening's "Life In Hell" comics

    • When Homer tells Moe to get out of their house, Moe asks if he means "Get out" as in leave, or "Get out" as in "Get out! You bagged Bridget Fonda?" In real life, Danny Elfman (composer of the theme for "The Simpsons") actually did "bag" Bridget Fonda - they had gotten engaged earlier in 2003.

    • Fat Tony says he wants to take out the Castellaneta family; Dan Castellaneta is the voice of not only Homer, but several other people on the show.

    • In 2003, Hank Azaria won an Emmy for 'Outstanding Voice-Over Performance', for this episode.

    • The shirt Moe is wearing at Maggie's birthday party is the one Marge gave him

    • This episode was written by J. Stewart Burns who won an Emmy for the Futurama episode "Roswell That Ends Well".

    • If you look carefully at the Botanical Gardens, you can see bushes shaped like Kang and Kodos.

    • Lionel Hutz is visible in the large panning crowd shot at the Botanical Gardens.

    • Blackboard Joke: None.
      Couch Gag: The family (looking like gingerbread people) enters their gingerbread house style living room and takes their places on the couch. Homer then leans in front of Marge and takes a bite out of the top of Bart's head.

  • ALLUSIONS (4)

    • OshKosh B'Gosh:
      Moe refers to Apu's child as OshKosh B'Gosh probably because he's wearing overalls reminiscent of the family brand clothing line.

    • Carl, to Dr Hibbert: A dream deferred is a dream denied.
      Written by Black American poet and abolitionist, James Langston Hughes (1902-1967).

    • :
      The title of the episode references the comic strip "Baby Blues." But it probably really owes more to Spike Lee's 1990 film "Mo' Better Blues."

    • :
      There are a lot of references to Francis Ford Coppola's "Godfather" trilogy in this episode. Fat Tony even comments on the poor critical reception of the third film.

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