The Singing Detective

Season 1 Episode 6

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Aired Unknown Dec 21, 1986 on BBC
8.4
out of 10
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Episode Summary

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Who Done It
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As Doctor Gibbon coaxes him into revealing more and more of his deeply hidden traumas, Philip's various fictions increasingly merge and intertwine. Some of his characters are not at all happy with him and seek him out to exact retribution. Eventually they reach his present self in the hospital ward and precipitae a final crisis.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    David Ryall

    David Ryall

    Mr. Hall

    Patrick Malahide

    Patrick Malahide

    Mark Binney/Raymond Binney/Mark Finney

    Ron Cook

    Ron Cook

    First Mysterious Man

    George Rossi

    George Rossi

    Second Mysterious Man

    Michael Gambon

    Michael Gambon

    Philip Marlow

    Geff Francis

    Geff Francis

    Porter

    Samantha Bryant

    Samantha Bryant

    Barbara

    Guest Star

    Bill Paterson

    Bill Paterson

    Dr. Gibbon

    Guest Star

    William Speakman

    William Speakman

    Mark Binney (aged 10)

    Guest Star

    Janet Henfrey

    Janet Henfrey

    Schoolteacher

    Recurring Role

    Imelda Staunton

    Imelda Staunton

    Staff Nurse White

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (5)

      • "When Oy grow up, Oy be gonna be a detective!" (The closing words, spoken by 10-year-old Philip, high up in his tree.)

      • "What's the loveliest word in the English language, officer? In the sound it makes in your mouth, in the shape it makes on the page, hmm? Whadja think? ... Well now, I'll tell you: E, L, B, O, W, 'elbow'" (Philip, to the policeman).

      • "You're a killer! My God, you're a killer! You smash up people's lives. You are rotten with your own bile. You think you're smart but, really, you're very, very sad, because you use your illness as a weapon against other people, and as an excuse for not being properly human. Yeugh! You disgust me!" (Nicola, at first seeming to be addressing Finney, but actually speaking to Philip.)

      • "I sat at my desk, a perjurer, charlatan, and watched and listened, and watched and listened, as one after another after another--they nailed that poor lad, hands and feet, to my story. I've not seriously doubted since that afternoon that any lie will receive almost instant corroboration, and almost instant collaboration, if the maintainance of it results in the public enjoyment of someone else's pain, someone else's humiliation" (Philip, to Dr. Gibbon).

      • "You just don't know writers. They'll use anything, anybody. They'll eat their own young" (Philip, speaking to Dr. Gibbon).

    • NOTES (1)

      • More crew:
        Choreography ... Quinny Sacks
        Properties Buyer ... David Morris
        Camera Assistant ... Ian Jackson
        Editing Assistant ... Rob Sylvester
        Graphic Designer ... Joanna Ball
        Assistant Floor Managers ... Lynda Pannett, Garry Boon, Nick Wyse, Anna Price
        Production Associate ... Ian Brindle
        Production Assistants ... Diana Brookes, Sue Dunford, Sally Blake
        Dubbing Editor ... Colin Ritchie
        Film Recordists ... Clive Derbyshire, John Parry

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

      • The Murder of Roger Ackroyd: When the two mysterious men find Mark Binney dead, they go through his papers and find one on which is written "Who killed Roger Ackroyd?" This refers to Agatha Christie's famous novel The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. The reference is quite apt, since in the novel, the murderer turns out to be the narrator, while in The Singing Detective, the "murderer" is Phillip Marlow, the narrator/writer/imaginer. Note that in the DVD commentary track, Jon Amiel misidentifies both the author of the novel and the decade in which it was written.

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