The Waltons

Season 1 Episode 16

The Fire

1
Aired Thursday 8:00 PM Jan 11, 1973 on CBS
6.7
out of 10
User Rating
36 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
A young girl's father objects to Miss Hunter's teaching Evolution.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • The Creationist

    9.0
    Some real drama this week as a wayward father takes offence at the local school and decides to burn it down, killing himself in the process. I hadn't realised they knew about Cro-Magnon man in the 1930s, and I certainly didn't think they would be teaching it in schools in the American south. Just goes to show how much you can learn from The Waltons.

    Laurie Prange puts in a great performance as the downtrodden Lois Bascomb. She creates a very believable character and it's a shame we don't see her again. The idea of the smart-but-held-back child is one they will come back to several times in this show.

    In a way, it's a shame they called this episode The Fire, as it gives the plot away rather cheaply. Even so, I didn't expect the father to be trapped in the flames. Although they stopped short of showing the body, his death was strong stuff for a show like this.

    I can't believe the bloke who played the father was only 35 (according to this website). He looked way old than that. Must be that California sun.moreless
  • When a young girl's alcholic father objects to Miss. Hunter's teaching on evolution, he decides that no school is better than an athiest school.

    9.6
    FIRST OF ALL- if you've never watched the Waltons and this is your first review reading about an episode, than you need to know, 'The Waltons is a GODfearing show', none of the people in the community are athiests, it is only the moronic father of an innocent girl. Now that we have that out of the way,let's talk about this utterly outstanding and innovative episode! This is one of those episodes that you'll remember for a long time. It has it all! Saddness, happiness, and even humor! This is a great episode that shows ust what The Waltons are made of! If you watch this episode you will not feel that rejection feeling like so many other shows give you.*I completely recomend this episode!*~ Old shows finaticmoreless
Helen Kleeb

Helen Kleeb

Miss Mamie Baldwin

Joe Conley

Joe Conley

Ike Godsey

Ellen Corby

Ellen Corby

Grandma Esther Walton

Mary Jackson

Mary Jackson

Miss Emily Baldwin

Richard Thomas

Richard Thomas

John-Boy Walton

Judy Norton

Judy Norton

Mary Ellen Walton

Richard Bradford

Richard Bradford

Lutie Bascomb

Guest Star

Laurie Prange

Laurie Prange

Lois May Bascomb

Guest Star

Lisa Eilbacher

Lisa Eilbacher

Jeanette

Guest Star

Mariclare Costello

Mariclare Costello

Miss Hunter

Recurring Role

John Crawford

John Crawford

Sheriff Ep Bridges

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (1)

    • When the father walks into the school room, he clearly writes the word REPENT in all caps on the board. If you look carefully, it is still the original "REPENT" from the far camera angle, but when it switches to the zoom-in on the teacher, you can tell the word has been rewritten. For example, notice the first "E" is now smaller.

  • QUOTES (2)

    • Opening Narration: Most of us on Walton's Mountain prided ourselves on our friendly hospitality, our family's good name, and our dignity as individuals, but in a remote hollow lived a man named Lutie Bascomb, with his daughter Lois May. If Lutie prided himself on anything, it was his cussedness.

    • Closing Narration: I can only ask you to take my word for the end of the story of Lois May Bascomb, for truth is far stranger than fiction. I was to meet her many years later when she had become not a scientist, but the wife of a diplomat. She now lives abroad and I expect that sometimes her memories, as mine do, return to those Depression years, and Walton's Mountain.

  • NOTES (0)

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

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