The Waltons

Season 1 Episode 21

The Scholar

0
Aired Thursday 8:00 PM Feb 22, 1973 on CBS
7.5
out of 10
User Rating
34 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
A neighbor lady, Verdie Grant, asks John-Boy to teach her to read and write. He agrees to teach her as he helps Elizabeth. Things go wrong, however, and feelings get hurt.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • The Big Secret

    8.5
    Really good theme this week. Having John-boy teach Verdie to read makes an excellent storyline and it's handled very sensitively. I'm not sure how she has managed to keep her lack of letters a secret for so long but let's not worry about that for now.

    Verdie is a very believable character and I'm glad the producers decided to keep her on for the rest of the series. She could so easily have been just another one-episode wonder. I did think her reaction to Miss Hunter finding out her secret was rather over the top. Whilst providing some good drama in the middle of the episode, it did tarnish her character a little.

    What else? Oh yes: Erin has her tonsils out and Olivia and Esther go to Richmond for a wedding. Both these give Verdie a reason to be around the house so top marks for that. Erin's bell made me laugh. How annoying must that have been for the others?

    And we get to meet young Henry Wagaman. Oh look! Another thirties kid with a seventies hairstyle. Send for the scissors!moreless
Royce Wallace

Royce Wallace

Alice Perry

Guest Star

Kerry MacLane

Kerry MacLane

Henry Wagaman

Guest Star

Lynn Hamilton

Lynn Hamilton

Verdie Foster

Recurring Role

Mariclare Costello

Mariclare Costello

Miss Hunter

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (2)

    • Opening Narration: When I was growing up on Walton's Mountain, the Great Depression touched our lives in many ways. Jobs were scarce, new clothes were rare, food was simple and mostly home grown. What we had we shared. My father taught us by his quiet practice that sharing was our first duty and happiest privilege. And on one occasion I had the opportunity to share an unforgettable experience with a lady who was trying to hide a secret.

    • Closing Narration: How to get attention without playing sick; how to keep from getting hung up on the barbed wire of old prejudices and grievances. As we fumbled towards answers to these and a thousand other questions we were lucky to have the teasing of our brothers and sisters to keep us from taking ourselves too seriously and the unfailing love of our mother and father to reassure and sustain us.

  • NOTES (1)

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

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