The West Wing

Season 3 Episode 10

H. Con-172

1
Aired Wednesday 9:00 PM Jan 09, 2002 on NBC
8.6
out of 10
User Rating
101 votes
3

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
Majority Counsel Clifford Calley makes Leo an offer regarding the MS affair he wants very much to refuse; Josh looks for any excuse to see Amy Gardner; a fired White House photographer has written a tell-all book about the Administration that Sam wants to refute point by point; Charlie gives the President a present that touches him and troubles everyone else.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • When the fall's all that's left.

    9.0
    I'm still not sure about Amy, she's just not getting any big laughs out of me and I would prefer to see Josh dealing with White House issues rather than a relationship. Especially with what was going on in the White House at the time and that he was the only one on the staff that was in the loop about it. Though I did actually enjoy all the scenes about/involving her, just not her. The scene between Toby and Josh, when he's trying to come up with an excuse to see her, in particular was hilarious.



    Josh: "Where the hell are the pro-lifers when you need 'em?"

    Toby: "Sons of *****es."



    The plot with the ex White House photographer was good, Sam's sense of honor and duty is very admirable and one of the reasons I like his character so much. That innocent idealism that most people get hammered out of us at an early age, is still evident in Sam. Plus I loved Charlie's facial expressions in reaction to hearing snippets from the book. Speaking of Charlie, his gift to Bartlet, the map of the Holy Land from 1709, led to some funny moments between him, Bartlet, and the rest of the staff.



    Bartlet: "I'm having it enlarged and bolting it to the hood of my limo! They don't want us to put up our map, Charlie. They're philistines in the fight for freedom. But that doesn't bother us does it?"

    Charlie: "Huh?"

    Bartlet: "Never mind."



    The continuation of the Grand Jury Investigation plot was handled well. It was hard to watch Leo struggling with the decision to tell Bartlet about the censure deal from the majority counsel. As much as it will hurt Bartlet to be censured, I think Leo is going to take it even harder, which speaks to how much he cares for and respects Bartlet. Their scene together at the end was really moving.



    Bartlet: "No one in government takes responsibility for anything anymore. We foster, we obfuscate, we rationalize. 'Everybody does it,' that's what we say. So we've come to occupy a moral safe house where everyone's to blame so no one's guilty. I'm to blame, I was wrong."



    And I loved the voice over of the censure being read as they sat together, quietly watching the snow fall.



    Could have been another 10, but it went down a little because of Amy, the rest of the episode was excellent though.moreless
  • Saving Leo

    8.5
    So, this episode continues two weeks later where it was left in last episode and the holiday brake is over and Leo is soon getting back to hearing and all those things they would not like here, are going to be there but then surfaces the man who Donna was seeing and propose deal to Leo and he turns it down but he does not give up and it ends in Josh's hears and until president hears it and in the end, they take it.



    On the other time, Sam is very worried about someone who worked in white house for 30 minutes and now is publishing a book and Josh makes up stupid excuse to go and see Amy and there is a problem with a map what president likes but they say he cannot hang it on the wall.moreless
  • Aww... This is a cute episode. And you know, serious at the same time. "Exactly how long does it take to get a purse together?" "That's a question I've been trying to have answered my entire adult life."moreless

    8.9
    *Josh and Amy! God, I love Josh... He is hysterical. I love his talk with Toby, and Toby was so great in that one. Any way with his being a straight shooter and going under the cover of business. Haha, I could not stop laughing during his scenes. And then when Amy showed up at his porch. Awwwwww....

    *The thing with Cliff and Donna was very "All the President's Men." I loved it! But the censure thing... I don't know. It's nice to know that everyone has Leo's back, but I still don't think it's fair! I loved how they did the end. That was amazing, how he and Leo were sitting there and they had the voice over of the censure. Pretty great.

    *The book thing was funny, I'd like to have see a little more of that though. The miniature golf and the president's special underwear.moreless
Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen

President Jed Bartlet

Dule Hill

Dule Hill

Charlie Young

Allison Janney

Allison Janney

Claudia Jean "C.J." Cregg

Rob Lowe

Rob Lowe

Sam Seaborn (Episodes 1-84)

Richard Schiff

Richard Schiff

Toby Ziegler

John Spencer

John Spencer

Leo McGarry

Kinga Phillips

Kinga Phillips

Waitress

Guest Star

Mary-Louise Parker

Mary-Louise Parker

Amy Gardner

Recurring Role

Joanna Gleason

Joanna Gleason

Jordan Kendall

Recurring Role

Mark Feuerstein

Mark Feuerstein

Clifford Calley

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (3)

    • Bartlet: No one in government takes responsibility for anything anymore. We foster, we obfuscate, we rationalize. "Everybody does it," that's what we say. So we've come to occupy a moral safe house, where everyone's to blame so no one's guilty. I'm to blame, I was wrong.

    • Bartlet: I'm having it enlarged and bolting it to the hood of my limo! They don't want us to put up our map, Charlie. They're philistines in the fight for freedom. But that doesn't bother us does it?
      Charlie: Huh?
      Bartlet: Never mind.

    • Amy Gardner: You know what? Maybe not so much for you with the talking.

  • NOTES (3)

    • Andrew Jackson's 1834 censure:

      Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States, was censured for defunding the Second Bank of the United States by withdrawing U.S. funds in 1833. He also vetoed its 1832 re-charter by Congress. Jackson felt that the bank only improved the fortunes of an elite circle of commercial and industrial entrepreneurs at the expense of farmers and laborers.

      More information here and here.

    • Awards and Nominations:
      Bradley Whitford was nominated for the 2002 Emmy in the catergory of Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series for his perfomance in this episode and in "The Two Bartlets"

      Mary-Louise Parker was nominated for the 2002 Emmy in the catergory of Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series for his perfomance in this episode and in "The Women of Qumar"

    • Music: C.J. sings a few bars of "Cool" to Sam. The music is by Leonard Bernstein and the lyrics are by Stephen Sondheim. The song is from the 1961 musical West Side Story.

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • This reference to "The Lion in Winter" quotation: "As if it matters how a man falls down..." is an example of Aaron Sorkin reusing a line from his lesser known series, "Sports Night." Jeremy Goodwin (played by Joshua Malina, who would later go on to play in the "West Wing") mentions this same quote in the episode "What Kind of Day Has It Been."

    • Toby: Hey, your favorite movie was on TV last night.
      Bartlet: (quoting) "By God, I'm 50, alive, and a king, all at the same time."
      Toby: I turned it on just as they got to the scene when Richard, Geoffrey and John were locked in the dungeon, and Henry was coming down to execute them. Richard tells his brothers not to cower, but to take it like men. And Geoffrey says, "You fool. As if it matters how a man falls down." And Richard says, "When the fall is all that's left ..."
      Bartlet: "...it matters a great deal."

      This dialog is from The Lion in Winter (1968), starring Peter O'Toole, Katherine Hepburn, and Anthony Hopkins.

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