The West Wing

Season 3 Episode 13

Night Five

1
Aired Wednesday 9:00 PM Feb 06, 2002 on NBC
8.5
out of 10
User Rating
104 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Stanley Keyworth revisits the White House to uncover the reason Bartlet hasn't been able to sleep since the night of the Iowa caucus; C.J. enlists Leo's help in freeing a White House reporter kidnapped while on assignment in the Congo; Toby and Andy joust over an upcoming presidential speech condemning Islamic fanaticism by name; Donna is offered a lucrative dot.com job by an old friend; Sam sparks an exchange on radical versus lipstick feminism when he comments on Ainsley's evening attire immediately after asking her to review language in Bartlet's U.N. address.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • When we win.

    9.0
    Ainsley's appearance in this episode was great(and I mean that literally and figuratively, that dress was crazy), her back and forth with Sam was as funny as ever and I liked her stance on sexual revolution and harassment. Though really, who in their right mind could think Sam, the defender of all that is right and just, would demean women? The culminating scene between them all in the communications bullpen was both hilarious and poignant.



    Sam: "I also think it's important to make clear that I'm not a sexist."

    Charlie: "And that I'm all man."

    Ainsley: "You're Celia? He's not a sexist."



    CJ's plot involving the reporter captured in the Congo provided some compelling drama. It was nice to see CJ would go to the mat for any of the reporters, even ones that aren't fans of the administration. Her and Leo were great in the scene in his office, with the Congolese Attaché. CJ's fearlessness is something to be admired.



    CJ: "This is a shake down, so tell us how much money and where does it go!"

    Mr. Loboko: "The Congolese government doesn't associate with murderers-"

    CJ: "The Congolese government is a myth!"

    Mr. Loboko: "I can't talk to this woman."

    Leo: "Mr. Loboko, how much money and where does it go?"



    I loved the shot after they find out Bill is dead, with Donna standing in the hallway looking in on CJ consoling Bill's wife and on the other end of the hall Josh in his office, moving on quickly to another issue as he would any other day. It echoed his initial reaction to the news of Donna's job offer and her being divided between him and something else. I agreed with Josh giving her no special treatment or extra incentive to stay. Yes she could get a better paying job with more power, but if she wants to give up what she's a part of now for that, then it's on her. Though obviously Josh wouldn't be thrilled about losing her, or probably even able to function without her.



    I also enjoyed Toby's scenes with Andy, though I still find it hard to believe they weren't ever arguing long enough to get married.



    It was nice seeing Dr. Stanley Keyworth make another appearance and his scenes with Bartlet were probably the best moments of the episode. I was glad Stanley was as upfront and unabashed with the President as he was with Josh, at first I thought he might be starstruck, but if he was he got over it.



    Bartlet: "It's not good for a person to keep setting goals?"

    Stanley: "It probably is but it's tricky for somebody who's still trying to get his father to stop hitting him."



    It was hard to see Bartlet in such a rough mental state but the performance was brilliant.



    9/10, Season 3 is starting to hold steady in terms of quality, à la season 2.moreless
  • Sleepless nights

    8.3
    There is some weird moments when White House organize the psychologist who helped Josh to help now president who has sleeping problems. Even it first looks like the problem is not for psychologist but in the end, it comes out that the problem is that president's problem with his father in past.



    The most moving part of this episode was the case CJ was dealing. I am not sure but I think it was the reporter she talked some episodes ago and who is now kidnapped in Congo and they try to get him back but he gets killed. And the end when they told it to his wife.. it was heartbroken...moreless
Martin Sheen

Martin Sheen

President Jed Bartlet

Dule Hill

Dule Hill

Charlie Young

Allison Janney

Allison Janney

Claudia Jean "C.J." Cregg

Rob Lowe

Rob Lowe

Sam Seaborn (Episodes 1-84)

Richard Schiff

Richard Schiff

Toby Ziegler

John Spencer

John Spencer

Leo McGarry

Adam Arkin

Adam Arkin

Stanley Keyworth

Guest Star

Alanna Ubach

Alanna Ubach

Celia Walton

Guest Star

Carmen Argenziano

Carmen Argenziano

Leonard Wallace

Guest Star

Kathleen York

Kathleen York

Andrea Wyatt

Recurring Role

Emily Procter

Emily Procter

Ainsley Hayes

Recurring Role

Nicole Robinson

Nicole Robinson

Margaret

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • At the end of the episode, we see a framed photo on a lamp table in the president's private study. It is of Bartlet's father, as portrayed by series producer Lawrence O'Donnell.

  • QUOTES (4)

    • Bartlet: It's not good for a person to keep setting goals?
      Stanley: It probably is but it's tricky for somebody who's still trying to get his father to stop hitting him.

    • C.J.: This is a shake down, so tell us how much money and where does it go!
      Mr. Loboko: The Congolese government doesn't associate with murderers-
      C.J.: The Congolese government is a myth!
      Mr. Loboko: (Turns to Leo) I can't talk to this woman.
      Leo: Mr. Loboko, how much money and where does it go?

    • Sam: I also think it's important to make clear that I'm not a sexist.
      Charlie: And that I'm all man.

    • Toby: They'll like us when we win.

  • NOTES (1)

    • Awards and Nominations:
      Martin Sheen was nominated in 2002 for the Emmy of Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series for his performance in this episode

      Richard Schiff was nominated in 2002 for the Emmy of Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series for his performance in this episode and in "Hartsfield's Landing"

      This episode won the 2002 Emmy for Outstanding Drama Series along with many other from the season (Aaron Sorkin, Thomas Schlamme, John Wells, Kevin Falls, Alex Graves, Christopher Misiano, Michael Hissrich, Kristin Harms, Llewellyn Wells)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • Episode Title: "Night Five" refers to the night Bartlet sees a psychiatrist after not being able to sleep for four consecutive nights.

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