The Wild Wild West (1969)

Season 2 Episode 9

The Night of the Watery Death

0
Aired Friday 7:30 PM Nov 11, 1966 on CBS
7.2
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Episode Summary

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The Night of the Watery Death
AIRED:
A mysterious dragon-like creature is blowing up American ships, and Jim and Artie must determine the cause.

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Jocelyn Lane

Jocelyn Lane

Dominique

Guest Star

John Ashley

John Ashley

Lt. Keighley

Guest Star

Forrest Lewis

Forrest Lewis

Captain Pratt

Guest Star

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (4)

    • In the episode "The Night of the Returning Dead," it took place 13 years after the Civil War began. That would make it 1874. In this episode, West said that Admiral Farragut is arriving but Farragut died in 1870.

    • Disguises: Swedish sailor

    • Gadgets: wrist knife, boot tip knife, explosive magnetic coin designed to blow up at high temperature

    • When the Marquis prepares to launch his "torpedo," when it's above the hatch there's nothing dripping from the bottom. But when they cut to a shot of it being lowered into the water, there are two streams of water draining down from the bottom.

  • QUOTES (3)

    • The Marquis: You imply that I'm not practical?
      Jim: No, I said you're cracked.

    • Keighley: Ah, Gordon, prey what have you dredged up from the briny, Neptune himself? (chuckles and leaves)
      Artie: I bet that man furnishes enough wind to sail his own ship.

    • Jim: Artie, are you sure that your voice is up to addressing this, um, society?
      Artie: Are you kidding? I can reach the last row of a showboat while doing a buck-and-wing, fighting a bout with double pneumonia.

  • NOTES (1)

    • Commercial breaks: the Marquis standing over Jim (ur), a dragon torpedo (ul), Jim in front of the force field (lr), the Wanderer (ll)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • Artie: Are you kidding? I can reach the last row of a showboat while doing a buck-and-wing...
      A buck-and-wing is a solo tap dance, with the emphasis on sharp loud taps.

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